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NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RACERS HAVE plenty to focus on during a 10-mile run. How to keep a man's heart beating and lungs pumping isn't usually one of them. But that's exactly what a group of about 12 health-care workers competing in the Broad Street Run went through on Sunday when one of their own collapsed right in front of them. Thanks to their efforts, that 31-year-old man is alive today. After seeing their colleague off in an ambulance, those lifesavers all went on to finish the race. "People stopped out of the kindness of their hearts as soon as he went down," said Kristen, a physician's assistant who didn't want her last name published.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
NEWS
April 29, 2015
ISSUE | NEXT MAYOR Worthy pleadings The mayoral candidates' suggestions for dealing with Philadelphia's staggering poverty problem left out one critical need: increased funding for civil legal aid to poor people ("Mayoral Q&A," April 24). Philadelphia has one of the very best legal-aid programs in the nation, one that is known for aggressively representing low-income Philadelphians, making sure their problems are heard and addressed, and pushing for systems and policies to be fixed when they harm vulnerable poor families.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When investors first called Tom Spann with their idea of making health care more accessible, he thought they were nuts, to put it politely. No way was he going to leave a senior management job - leading a $2 billion unit of the consulting group Accenture, for "the most cockamamie thing I ever heard," Spann said. Even so, in 2007, Spann did just that, leaving Accenture to become founding chief executive of Accolade Inc. in Plymouth Meeting. The cockamamie idea was to create a concierge business, hired by companies such as Lowe's and Comcast to help their employees navigate the health-care system.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - When Gov. Christie slashed spending for women's health services in his first term, legislators and advocates feared that women would lose access to a range of needed health-care services. The Christie administration now is saying women have greater access to such services in New Jersey than they did before he took office in 2010. Appearing before the Senate Budget Committee on Tuesday, Health Commissioner Mary E. O'Dowd said the number of women served by federally qualified health centers has increased 25 percent since 2009, more than offsetting the number of women who lost access to family planning centers because of Christie's budget cuts and vetoes.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the morning of her annual physical, Judy Dohany sat on the edge of the examining table at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with the happy anticipation of a good student waiting for a favorite professor's feedback. "I couldn't wait to see Dr. Ziring," Dohany said. "I like to keep tabs on my blood pressure. I'm 50 now. Things start to happen. I've lost friends to heart attacks. My best friend has diabetes. It scares me. " For nearly 20 years, her internist, Barry Ziring, has been giving her annual physical exams, a ritual that for just as long has been deemed unhelpful and even harmful.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rising labor and health-care costs are the biggest drivers of a 2.84 percent increase in SEPTA's operating budget proposed for the financial year that starts July 1. The $1.36 billion budget calls for 70 more employees - mostly in safety and construction-support positions - and would make permanent the all-night subway service on Fridays and Saturdays that began as an experiment this year. The budget assumes no fare increases. It anticipates a state subsidy of $658 million, up by $29 million from this year's spending plan.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Exhausted after his shift as a waiter, Richard P. Miller, then a 21-year-old college senior, jumped into his rickety Volkswagen bug and headed back to his school. He didn't make it. "I fell asleep at the wheel and hit a bridge abutment going about 40 m.p.h.," said Miller, now 62, president and chief executive of Virtua Health Inc., the three-hospital health system based in Marlton. Helicoptered to a shock-trauma unit in Maryland, "I actually ended up on a ventilator and I ended up on dialysis and wasn't given much chance," he said.
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