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NEWS
January 12, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Mayor Kenney used plain language to describe his vision for Philadelphia's government during his inauguration last week: City services will be effective and efficient. One tangible element of his strategy is to use existing school buildings to deliver social services - such as adult English-language instruction, health care, and homeless assistance - to neighborhoods, making them available to people where they live and sparing those who don't have the time or ability to trek to Center City for help.
NEWS
January 12, 2016
By Perry Farmer and Barbara Ebling It's January, and families are facing some serious decisions about quality of life. For some, it may mean something as simple as a new gym membership. For others, the decision is far more serious. Many are looking for ways to ease the pain of a terminally ill family member through a regimen of palliative care. This year, more physicians will be doing advanced care planning. If you have Medicare, your doctor will now be reimbursed for an appointment to discuss the type of life you want when ill. Palliative care may be part of that conversation.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
More than 900 people packed the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown on Dec. 8 for the 13th annual Jefferson Gala. Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus and his wife, Billi, were honored with the Award for Merit for their leadership and philanthropy and their contributions to health care, health education, and research. Dr. Leonard G. Gomella was presented the Achievement in Medicine Award, which honors a Jefferson physician who has provided exemplary care to patients as well as been a leader in the field.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
THE WAITES family of West Philadelphia never thought of Loreen Jones as anything but a treasured member of the family, even if she was a foster kid. "Loreen joined the Waites family circle when she was 14 months old," said Jean Waites-Howard, who was 14 years old when Loreen arrived. "She was the beloved baby of the family. " Jean more or less adopted her "baby sister," taking her everywhere, the baby propped on her hip. And Jean's mother, Bessie Waites, was no less attentive.
NEWS
December 20, 2015
The Auxiliary of Einstein Healthcare Network hosted its 63d Einstein Harvest Ball on Nov. 7 at the Hyatt at the Bellevue. More than 600 attended the event, which included dinner, dancing, and honoring Michelle and David Shabot, as well as Korn Ferry, for their longtime commitment to Einstein and health care. Fun was had by all, and the evening was a true success, as $1.15 million was raised, which will be used to support the more than 150,000 patients who visit the emergency rooms of Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia, Einstein Medical Center Elkins Park, and Einstein Medical Center Montgomery.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
On his first day on the job, David Carrozzino found a note on his desk to make a house call on his way home. More than two decades and thousands of visits later, Carrozzino, a podiatrist, still makes house calls to homebound patients in South Jersey. Carrozzino is among a rare breed in health care these days. A prevalent practice decades ago, home visits by physicians have declined drastically and are more often made today in rural areas. By his count, Carrozzino has made more than 15,700 house calls since that first visit in 1991.
NEWS
November 27, 2015 | BY THE REV. ROBERT SHINE, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
WITH A GOVERNMENT shutdown narrowly averted in September and the GOP still in disarray despite finding a new speaker of the House in Paul Ryan, looming crises about the functioning of our government are far from resolved. And the way Republican leaders have been acting recently is not inspiring confidence. Last month news broke that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was preparing a "ransom note" of Republicans' demands - including cuts to Social Security and Medicare and a rollback of clean water protections - for raising the debt ceiling, an action necessary to prevent the economy from heading into a dangerous spiral.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a deal worth nearly $1 billion to founder Peter McCausland, Airgas Inc., a Radnor distributor of industrial gases and related goods, has agreed to a $10.3 billion takeover by French giant Air Liquide, the two companies said Tuesday. The deal comes five years after McCausland survived a bitter takeover fight with Allentown's Air Products & Chemicals Inc., which wanted to buy Airgas for as much as $5.9 billion, or $70 a share, before giving up in February 2011 after a court loss. Paris-based Air Liquide agreed to pay Airgas shareholders $143 a share, a 50 percent premium to Airgas' close Thursday, the last day of trading before speculation about a deal started driving Airgas shares up. Airgas shares closed at $137.35 on Tuesday, up $31.17, or 29 percent Including debt, the deal is worth $13.4 billion, according to Air Liquide, which has a corporate hub in Houston, a research and development center in Newark, Del., and operations in Bucks County.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
What the heck is a Health Hack? It's no traditional hackathon, with computer geeks, pizza, and Red Bull. Instead, think medical professionals, engineers, artists, tech types, and an insurance company banding together to come up with creative solutions to improve delivery of health care. Toss in some yoga, zumba, and kickboxing, and add a vegetarian lunch for good measure. That was the scene at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital this weekend as about 250 participants in the first Independence/Jefferson Health Hack came together to brainstorm solutions to 60 health-care challenges, including reducing hospital admissions, wearable devices, and drone delivery of health care.
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