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NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE ACLU OF Pennsylvania is suing the secretary of the state Department of Human Services and two other officials for what it calls a "consistent and continuing failure" to provide adequate mental-health care for people ruled incompetent to stand trial in criminal cases. In the suit, filed yesterday in U.S. District Court, the ACLU rails against the state for having "the longest delays in the country" for competency restoration treatment, which would allow the cases to proceed. It claims the lack of resources violates the patients' rights to due process, as well as the American Disabilities Act and Rehabilitation Act. "Our clients in this case are the forgotten among the forgotten," said Witold Walczak, the ACLU of Pennsylvania's legal director.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WITH THE expiration of their contract looming, thousands of janitors will gather in Center City today to take a strike-authorization vote, union officials said last night. The 32BJ Service Employees International Union has been in negotiations with Building Owners Labor Relations Inc. - which represents Center City building owners - since Sept. 3, a protracted debate over pensions and health-care payments, according to Daisy Cruz, SEIU's Mid-Atlantic director. Nearly 10,000 of the union's members affected by the current contract will vote on whether to authorize a strike at 2:30 p.m. in the courtyard next to Temple University's Center City campus, across from City Hall.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Erin Aakhus, For The Inquirer
Maria is a tiny woman in her late 30s. Though she is a mother of two, she hasn't seen her children in more than 10 years. In 2004, she entrusted them to her mother in Honduras when Maria made her way, on foot, to the United States to find work. As I make rounds on the cancer ward at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, I find Maria seated at the foot of her hospital bed, hands folded neatly in her lap, bare feet swinging a good six inches above the linoleum floor. Every morning, she asks me in broken English when she can leave the hospital.
NEWS
October 8, 2015
LAST WEEK, Congress averted a government shutdown and passed a spending bill, thereby removing the wish of some Republicans to tie continued operation of the government to a move to defund Planned Parenthood. They weren't left completely dissatisfied, though, since a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing last week gave them a chance to excoriate Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards. They questioned her salary, her organization's fundraising ability, and those disputed videos that conservatives claim captured Planned Parenthood trying to "sell baby body parts.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's largest health insurer on Monday defended a new alliance it has struck with some of the state's hospital systems that's intended to lower costs for consumers, even as lawmakers questioned the criteria it used to choose its partners. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey last month announced it had formed the Omnia Health Alliance with six of the state's 20 hospital systems and a physicians group. The only South Jersey hospital system included in the alliance is Inspira.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of union janitors marched through Center City Wednesday, hoping to preserve their benefits and earn what they call fair wages. The rally on Chestnut Street included brief speeches by mayoral candidate Jim Kenney, City Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., and City Council President Darrell L. Clarke. Members of SEIU 32BJ gathered outside a high-rise apartment building at 2116 Chestnut about 11:45 a.m. After exciting the crowd with chants and encouraging words, union leaders led a march to John F. Kennedy Plaza.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
MENTION the word "health" and people usually think of doctors and hospitals. Those are the people and institutions that work to make individuals healthy. Public health has a broader mission - to make whole communities healthy. The first public health professionals were called "sanitarians," partly because of science's new found understanding of the link between disease and sanitation. It's hard to believe but Philadelphia did not begin to chlorinate its drinking water until 1913 - and that was decades after the link between typhoid and dirty water was a proven fact.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilmington's St. Francis Hospital agreed to a $4 million settlement with Medicare and Medicaid after volunarily disclosing that between 2007 and 2010 it improperly admitted patients into its inpatient rehabilitation unit and then billed the government, the U.S. Attorney for Delaware said. St. Francis closed the unit in 2011. The settlement also resolved allegations that 395-bed St. Francis employed a person who was excluded from participating in federal health care programs. St. Francis is part of Trinity Health, one of the nation's largest Catholic hospital systems.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cardiology Consultants of Philadelphia, the Rothman Institute, and other large specialty physician groups are organizing to link their practices' medical records electronically and eventually enter joint contracts with employers and insurers. Papers sealing a partnership creating NueHealth Greater Philadelphia are expected to be signed Thursday. NueHealth will start with 750 physicians from independent groups; an additional 250 have verbally committed to NueHealth, said its chief executive, Tom Eicke.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine has been training health-care practitioners. This month, the college formally installed its eighth president, Jay S. Feldstein, an alumnus of the college and a Philadelphia native. He has been in office for more than a year, during which he has developed a five-year strategic plan to help the college grow academically and physically. More than 1,000 students are seeking a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree at the college, where tuition is $45,036 a year.
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