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NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Robert Calandra and Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writers
Braving snow-covered roads and temperatures more Twin Cities than City of Brotherly Love, health advocates of many varieties filed into the Constitution Center auditorium Friday for a brief shot at criticizing (mostly) or praising Healthy Pennsylvania, Gov. Corbett's controversial proposal to expand Medicaid. Corbett's proposal came under fire for being too complex, too slow to take effect, too restrictive, and too expensive for the poor from one side and too generous from the other.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
I LOVE the annual ritual of making New Year's resolutions. Every year you have another chance. So don't be discouraged if you didn't meet last year's resolutions. Keep trying, especially if at the top of your list was to become a better money manager. Fidelity Investments found that for the third consecutive year surveying consumers, the top three financial resolutions for 2014 are saving more, paying off debt and spending less. As you begin listing the things you want to change about your finances in the New Year, I want you to think a little differently about the promises to yourself.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Mike Mittelman, the new president of Salus University, believes strongly in the importance of a sound body for a sound mind. During his three decades in the Navy, he ran a dozen marathons and participated in several Olympic-distance triathlons. A graduate of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, the institution that evolved into Salus, he is frustrated that so few people are familiar with Salus, what it offers, and the exciting work it is doing not only to improve vision but also to enhance health care in a wide variety of realms.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Robert Calandra and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
With Monday's deadline - now extended to Tuesday - to sign up for health insurance starting Jan. 1, hundreds of thousands of people flocked to the federal website and sought help from local organizations. About 850,000 people had visited the website by 2 p.m., five times more than the same time the previous Monday, on top of 1.2 million over the weekend, a federal spokeswoman said, and there were few glitches. "Yes, everybody waited until today to enroll," said a harried-sounding Laura Line, corporate assistant director for Philadelphia-based Resources for Human Development, who had to rush off the phone at 5:15 p.m. to help a new arrival get insurance.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Health care is a serious personal financial matter, and deciding to forgo insurance under the Affordable Care Act will cost you. But just how much? Let's compare the cost of buying health insurance vs. the tax penalty for going uninsured. According to the Congressional Budget Office and the Joint Committee on Taxation, an estimated six million Americans will opt to forgo health insurance and pay the penalty instead. In 2014, the tax cost of going without health insurance will be $95 or 1 percent of the portion of modified adjusted gross income that exceeds the federal income-tax filing threshold of $10,150, according to Ed Kohlhepp, founder of Kohlhepp Investment Advisors in Doylestown.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps Gov. Corbett's proposed plan for uninsured residents should be called Stressful PA, as the 97-page draft for Healthy Pennsylvania seems designed to induce headaches and sleepless nights. The Republican governor, no fan of President Obama's Affordable Care Act and up for reelection next year, finally released specifics this month on how he would use billions of federal dollars to provide health care for an estimated 500,000 uninsured Pennsylvanians. And, boy, is Corbett specific.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The debate over the Affordable Care Act can stay small, focusing on website failures and other short-term difficulties facing the law. Or it can get bigger, with wider insurance coverage seen as part of a larger struggle for social justice in a nation growing steadily less equal. On Wednesday in Washington, President Obama decided it was time to go bigger. With HealthCare.gov finally beginning to work, the president sought a return to the ground he fought from so effectively during the 2012 campaign.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Updated at noon Friday HARRISBURG The Corbett administration plans to  submit a waiver to the federal government sometime after mid-January seeking to use billions of dollars in Medicaid funds to provide health insurance for hundreds of thousands of uninsured Pennsylvanians. The details of the 100-page proposal were made Friday in a plane posted online and available here . The Assoctiated Press is reporting that health care advocates who are reading the proposal are calling it punitive and bureaucratic.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
There had been telltale signs of dementia - repeating conversations, getting lost in stores, forgetting things. But then came the day in February when Clare Day's 82-year-old father dropped her 82-year-old mother off at the supermarket. By the time her sister had picked up her mother as planned and returned her to their Logan home, their father had vanished. He had driven from Logan to Hulmeville in Bucks County, where "he ended up at the fire station," says Day, 52, of South Philadelphia, who went with family to get him. "I took his car keys and drove the car home and have had it ever since.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
What do Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, and Bill Clinton all have in common? They all supported the idea of national health coverage. In stepping back from the issues at hand with the Affordable Care Act, it's important to note how the idea of national health coverage has crossed party lines, from Republican to Democratic hands, and has been more than a hundred years in the making. Though Barack Obama is the first American president to succeed in passing a universal health-care plan, in his new book Mother of Invention (Oxford University Press, 336 pp., $55)
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