CollectionsHealth Care
IN THE NEWS

Health Care

NEWS
February 26, 2014
Better legal tools Recent arrests in connection with the 2012 arson and vandalism of a Quaker meetinghouse construction site in Chestnut Hill shed light on a longstanding concern that intimidation and violence remain a dark side of organized labor in Pennsylvania ("Violence doesn't benefit unions," Feb. 21). While most unions do not participate in these activities, the scenario involving Ironworkers Local 401 shows the state needs additional legal safeguards. State law exempts parties to a labor dispute from prosecution for certain types of harassment, but legislation before the state House (House Bill 1154)
NEWS
February 25, 2014
LAST WEEK, Gov. Corbett sent an official application to the federal government explaining why he thinks that his plan for offering health coverage to low-income Pennsylvanians is better than the feds' plan. A draft of Corbett's proposal was made public in December and was the subject of hearings in January. Unfortunately, the official application hasn't improved with time. To review: As part of the Affordable Care Act, the feds have given states the option to expand Medicaid in order to make sure that as many people as possible will have health coverage.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
As millions of policyholders learned late last year that their health insurance was being canceled, recriminations began to fly. Who was to blame? Was it incompetent, devious Democrats intent on soaking the rich, or menacing Republican saboteurs taking time out from their relentless war on women to take away health care from the poor? Then a new and seemingly soothing narrative emerged. It was sagely suggested that policymakers always understood there would be winners and losers, and anyway, this was all in the service of making health care better in America.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO Rowan University has received a $3.05 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to pay for an 18-month health-care delivery effort, the school announced Tuesday morning. The money will support a loose-knit collection of projects aimed at developing "new and enhanced methods and approaches to health-care delivery," Kenneth Blank, Rowan's senior vice president for health sciences, said at a news conference. Rowan will "convene panels of experts," Blank said, who will work with consultant teams to improve current programs, such as its Institute for Successful Aging.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It was just past 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and all the screens in Bonnell Hall's BG 25 computer lab at Community College of Philadelphia were alight with the blue-hued healthcare.gov home page. But the only people in the room for the scheduled Affordable Care Act workshop were Health Federation of Philadelphia certified application counselors Daniel Flynn and Gracie Chang, and navigator Hannah Sendolo. Where were the students? OK, it was early by college standards, and so cold that ducks were wearing goose down.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since 2011, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Virtua, the biggest health system in South Jersey, have been partners in pediatric care. The partnership started with Children's doctors providing services at Virtua hospitals in Voorhees and Mount Holly. Children's opened a specialty care center in June 2012 next to the new Virtua hospital in Voorhees. In the year ended June 30, children had 33,133 encounters with Children's Hospital physicians - an average of 91 a day - at Virtua locations, Children's Hospital chief executive Steven M. Altschuler said Friday at a meeting of the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross said Monday that it would invest up to $50 million in health-related venture funds and individual start-up companies that could help the region's largest health insurer improve quality and reduce the cost of health care. The time frame for the investments by the Strategic Innovation Portfolio has not been determined, but IBC chief executive Daniel J. Hilferty estimated that it would be five to seven years. The investment fund is a new element in a multipronged effort - now consolidated in what is called the IBC Center for Health Care Innovation - to turn the Philadelphia region into what Hilferty called "the national magnet" for companies developing technologies that could improve health care.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Four months ago, the healthcare.gov website wasn't looking so dandy to Ted Trevorrow. The insurance veteran and freshly certified Affordable Care Act navigator was shaken by the exchange's disastrous rollout and the cascade of Web errors that followed. "It took some luster off the ACA," said Trevorrow, speaking at Resources for Human Development's office in Roxborough. But these days much of that luster has returned to the site's bronze, silver, gold, and platinum plans. The website has rallied.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Since the 1960s, the number of people dying from heart disease has fallen steadily in the United States. But heart disease is still responsible for a quarter of all deaths, and remains the leading cause of mortality for both men and women. Innovations in care and more insight into risk factors has helped lessen its damaging impact. One insight is that many people can control their risk. Most heart disease is preventable, but "we don't pay attention to that disease process" until it's too advanced, said Daniel Edmundowicz, medical director of the Temple Heart and Vascular Institute in North Philadelphia.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|