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NEWS
October 8, 2015
LAST WEEK, Congress averted a government shutdown and passed a spending bill, thereby removing the wish of some Republicans to tie continued operation of the government to a move to defund Planned Parenthood. They weren't left completely dissatisfied, though, since a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing last week gave them a chance to excoriate Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards. They questioned her salary, her organization's fundraising ability, and those disputed videos that conservatives claim captured Planned Parenthood trying to "sell baby body parts.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's largest health insurer on Monday defended a new alliance it has struck with some of the state's hospital systems that's intended to lower costs for consumers, even as lawmakers questioned the criteria it used to choose its partners. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey last month announced it had formed the Omnia Health Alliance with six of the state's 20 hospital systems and a physicians group. The only South Jersey hospital system included in the alliance is Inspira.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Jack Tomczuk, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of union janitors marched through Center City Wednesday, hoping to preserve their benefits and earn what they call fair wages. The rally on Chestnut Street included brief speeches by mayoral candidate Jim Kenney, City Councilman Curtis Jones Jr., and City Council President Darrell L. Clarke. Members of SEIU 32BJ gathered outside a high-rise apartment building at 2116 Chestnut about 11:45 a.m. After exciting the crowd with chants and encouraging words, union leaders led a march to John F. Kennedy Plaza.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
MENTION the word "health" and people usually think of doctors and hospitals. Those are the people and institutions that work to make individuals healthy. Public health has a broader mission - to make whole communities healthy. The first public health professionals were called "sanitarians," partly because of science's new found understanding of the link between disease and sanitation. It's hard to believe but Philadelphia did not begin to chlorinate its drinking water until 1913 - and that was decades after the link between typhoid and dirty water was a proven fact.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilmington's St. Francis Hospital agreed to a $4 million settlement with Medicare and Medicaid after volunarily disclosing that between 2007 and 2010 it improperly admitted patients into its inpatient rehabilitation unit and then billed the government, the U.S. Attorney for Delaware said. St. Francis closed the unit in 2011. The settlement also resolved allegations that 395-bed St. Francis employed a person who was excluded from participating in federal health care programs. St. Francis is part of Trinity Health, one of the nation's largest Catholic hospital systems.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cardiology Consultants of Philadelphia, the Rothman Institute, and other large specialty physician groups are organizing to link their practices' medical records electronically and eventually enter joint contracts with employers and insurers. Papers sealing a partnership creating NueHealth Greater Philadelphia are expected to be signed Thursday. NueHealth will start with 750 physicians from independent groups; an additional 250 have verbally committed to NueHealth, said its chief executive, Tom Eicke.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine has been training health-care practitioners. This month, the college formally installed its eighth president, Jay S. Feldstein, an alumnus of the college and a Philadelphia native. He has been in office for more than a year, during which he has developed a five-year strategic plan to help the college grow academically and physically. More than 1,000 students are seeking a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree at the college, where tuition is $45,036 a year.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edith Mitchell grew up in the "very segregated" farming town of Brownsville, Tenn., at a time when it was unusual for a little girl of any race to dream of becoming a doctor. But she says that she decided, at age 3, to go to medical school after being impressed by the African American doctor who made a house call to her ailing great-grandfather. When she announced her ambition, no one tried to stop her. "You can be whatever you want to be," said her great-grandfather, who died not long after that visit.
NEWS
September 8, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
One-stop shopping has taken on new meaning for customers of the Acme supermarket just off the Black Horse Pike in Audubon. They can now add medical treatment to their grocery list. Prominently in the front of the Camden County supermarket is a recently opened clinic, staffed by a nurse-practitioner, that provides treatment for minor ailments, such as sore throats, fevers, flu, ear aches, and colds. "This is a good tool to use," said Brian Seeley, a Voorhees family physician who occasionally sees patients at the clinic.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2015
After all this time, Center City Philadelphia is still losing steam as a corporate center. Is that a bad thing? In the last two years, publicly traded Cigna , Sunoco , Arkema , Dow Chemical 's advanced materials division (formerly Rohm and Haas), and Destination Maternity all moved their headquarters to the suburbs or out of state, following the vanished banks, insurance companies, railroads and manufacturers. A few public companies have moved downtown - DuPont spin-off Axalta Coating Systems from Wilmington, and construction-project manager Hill International moved in from South Jersey.
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