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NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not while he was in the ambulance - weakness, vomiting, and the wooziness that accompanies a lack of insulin tend to crowd out any latent instinct for the ironic. But by the time Frederick Pegues Jr. was resting in bed at Temple University Hospital, the irony struck him hard. Here, he had just finished a monthlong course in being a community health worker, sponsored by Temple University Hospital. He had learned how to help patients navigate a complicated health system. Yet he himself had not been able to get the help he needed.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia school officials, announcing the first comprehensive changes to the sex education curriculum in four years, yesterday outlined plans to increase emphasis on abstinence in high-school and middle-school sex education classes. The new program, expected to begin as soon as March 23, builds on curriculum already in place which school officials said stresses abstinence, but which critics said does not. The program includes a course for middle-school students called "Into Adolescence: Choosing Abstinence" and one for high-school students called "Entering Adulthood: Coping with Sexual Pressures.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | By Karen Weintraub, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington Township Board of Education has hired a full-time director of anti-drug programs, after overcoming objections by members that the position would be too costly. On Sept. 25, the board voted, 7-0, to hire Edward F. McGuigan of Washington Township, Gloucester County, for the position of substance-abuse coordinator. The $27,000-a-year salary for the full-time position will be paid through a combination of state grants and a budget surplus, said Superintendent Walter Haworth.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
While a roomful of teachers cut out pictures of octupuses and bears and molar teeth, Ellen Gutwean talked about the healthy habits these visual aides would foster in the next generation of Philadelphia youngsters. "It deals with good health habits with the hope that the child - even in the first grade - will learn to appreciate his body and in the future make the right decision about substance abuse . . . and nutrition," said Gutwean, a workshop trainer and first-grade teacher in New York City.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It took Virginia Ewing less than an hour to explain the birth process to a group of seventh graders. But she had help. Using three-dimensional models of fetal development on lighted, movable panels, Ewing described what happens during each month of pregnancy. "The models helped the students see more clearly what they already talked about in their classroom," Ewing said. "This is different than using a textbook; it's almost a live demonstration. " The seventh graders from Our Lady of Lourdes School at 63d Street and Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia were among the first students to visit the Lankenau Hospital Health Education Center, one of 10 hospital-based centers in the United States.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Darlene Superville, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama underwent a fitness test at a Pentagon health clinic on Saturday as part of a periodic medical exam coordinated by his doctor. The White House said the results will be released by February. The Fit to Win Clinic says on its website that its mission is "to enhance military readiness and civilian wellness through fitness, nutrition, health education and positive lifestyle behavior changes. " Obama returned to the White House after spending just under two hours at the Pentagon.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Tia Swanson, Special to The Inquirer
The boys came out to play with the usual enthusiasm of second graders - a little shouting, a little jostling, a few brags. But as they approached a patchwork of X's painted on the blacktop, a strange orderliness overtook their fun. Each spotted an X and went to stand squarely on top of it, waiting to begin. "They all know where their X's are," Evergreen Elementary School Principal Richard Shetler said. This is the new lunch/physical-education progam in Woodbury's elementary schools.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Across town from the Franklin Plaza, while President Reagan was for the first time publicly endorsing education as a tool against AIDS, sixth-graders at a North Philadelphia public elementary school were getting the facts on the fatal disease. About 100 sixth-graders at the John F. Hartranft School, 8th and Cumberland streets, were assembled in the school's gymnasium yesterday afternoon to hear a talk on AIDS by experts from the city's Department of Public Health - and to ask questions.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
During the next school year, Philadelphia public school students from kindergarten through 12th grades will get some instruction about AIDS as part of their health education, but the youngest ones won't learn sex can be fatal. Herbert Hazan, director of school health services, said Philadelphia schools will teach pupils in kindergarten through fourth grades how AIDS is not transmitted, rather than how it is spread. "First-graders will not be taught at the same level of sophistication that 10th- or 11th-graders are taught," said Hazan.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
During the next school year, Philadelphia public school students from kindergarten through 12th grades will get some instruction about AIDS as part of their health education, but the youngest ones won't learn that sex can be fatal. Herbert Hazan, director of school health services, said Philadelphia schools will teach pupils in kindergarten through fourth grades how AIDS is not transmitted, rather than how it is spread. "First-graders will not be taught at the same level of sophistication that 10th- or 11th-graders are taught," said Hazan.
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NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rita Hodge Sellers, 84, a longtime nurse, health administrator and educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at Normandy Farms Estates retirement center in Blue Bell. Mrs. Sellers was known by family and friends as a strong mentor who was passionate about helping others, recalled her daughter, Suzanne Rita Sellers. She described her mother as someone who worked to keep herself healthy and whose favorite hobby was traveling. "She visited Rome, China, and Africa," said Suzanne Sellers. "I still remember when she and my dad took me to Paris as a graduation present when I was in college.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Carol Wolff took over as the head of the Camden branch of a federally funded community health organization, a disease was making headlines as "gay-related immune deficiency," or "gay cancer. " As HIV and AIDS became better understood, Wolff led her organization, the Camden Area Health Education Center, to establish a clean-needle exchange, group and individual counseling for those with HIV or AIDS, and HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness campaigns. The community-based mission led the group to create, in 1996, a weekly summertime farmer's market in downtown Camden.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett on Friday moved to fill two vacancies in the upper echelons of his administration. Corbett said he would nominate acting Health Secretary Michael Wolf to permanently fill the post vacated last fall, and he tapped lawyer Michael Sprow to serve as acting state inspector general. Wolf, 46, of Enola, a Harrisburg suburb, was director of worldwide public affairs and policy for pharmaceutical giant Pfizer before joining the Corbett administration in May 2011 as a top deputy to then-Health Secretary Eli N. Avila.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett on Friday moved to fill two vacancies in the upper echelons of his administration. Corbett said he would nominate acting Health Secretary Michael Wolf to permanently fill the post vacated last fall, and he tapped lawyer Michael Sprow to serve as acting state inspector general. Wolf, 46, of Enola, a Harrisburg suburb, was director of worldwide public affairs and policy for pharmaceutical giant Pfizer before joining the Corbett administration in May 2011 as a top deputy to then-Health Secretary Eli N. Avila.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Darlene Superville, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama underwent a fitness test at a Pentagon health clinic on Saturday as part of a periodic medical exam coordinated by his doctor. The White House said the results will be released by February. The Fit to Win Clinic says on its website that its mission is "to enhance military readiness and civilian wellness through fitness, nutrition, health education and positive lifestyle behavior changes. " Obama returned to the White House after spending just under two hours at the Pentagon.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The glitz is impressive: More school-lunch programs upgraded under the watch of Marc Vetri, one of the city's top restaurateurs, and more school-exercise programs boosted by the Philadelphia Union soccer team, one of the region's most popular sports franchises. Starting in the next few months, Independence Blue Cross Foundation will be funding an expansion of the lunch and exercise programs to five schools in the region, as well as a new third component - the placement of a team of health-care professionals in one of the schools, chosen because a high proportion of its students are at risk to develop chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not while he was in the ambulance - weakness, vomiting, and the wooziness that accompanies a lack of insulin tend to crowd out any latent instinct for the ironic. But by the time Frederick Pegues Jr. was resting in bed at Temple University Hospital, the irony struck him hard. Here, he had just finished a monthlong course in being a community health worker, sponsored by Temple University Hospital. He had learned how to help patients navigate a complicated health system. Yet he himself had not been able to get the help he needed.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
THESE DAYS, Fat Albert wouldn't fly on TV. Bill Cosby said as much on Monday at a forum held to promote good eating habits in poor communities, noting that his classic cartoon originated as an "empowering image" of an overweight boy with a speech impediment who was still "understood by his community. " Now, presenting a "lean and mean Albert" wouldn't work, either, he said at WHYY's Old City studio during "A Conversation on Community Health," sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline and the Atlantic magazine.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Glenn W. Samuelson, 91, a former Baptist pastor, accountant, and sociology professor, died Monday, May 28, of advanced Alzheimer's disease at Dock Woods, the continuing-care retirement community in Towamencin Township, Montgomery County, where he had resided since 1995. Dr. Samuelson was chairman of the sociology department from 1968 to 1972 at what is now West Chester University, where he taught sociology from 1965 until he retired as a full professor in 1991. His son, Donald, said that Dr. Samuelson completed two undergraduate programs and earned five graduate degrees.
NEWS
March 19, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Corbett's proposed budget would eliminate intake workers at city homeless shelters, reduce counseling services for people with HIV, and dramatically cut after-school programs for children, Philadelphia's health commissioner said Friday. Donald Schwarz told a group of state senators from Philadelphia that Corbett's proposals also would reduce spending on programs that get rid of lead in children's homes. He said the budget would eliminate nutrition education for hundreds of poor children and their parents.
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