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Health Effects

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NEWS
November 27, 1992 | By Melody Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Twenty Clifton Heights residents barred telephone company crews from their properties to hold up the construction in their neighborhood of a transmission tower for cellular phones. The residents fear that the tower - which rose through the roof of a commercial building near their homes and their children's schools a few weeks ago - could have harmful health effects. The tower, rising 35 feet above a one-story building on Austin Drive, is being constructed by Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems to transmit cellular-phone signals.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Frederic J. Frommer, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A federal judge on Tuesday ordered tobacco companies to publish corrective statements that say they lied about the dangers of smoking and that disclose smoking's health effects, including the death on average of 1,200 people a day. U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler previously had said she wanted the industry to pay for corrective statements in various types of advertisements. But Tuesday's ruling is the first time she's laid out what the statements will say. Each corrective ad is to be prefaced by a statement that a federal court has concluded that the defendant tobacco companies "deliberately deceived the American public about the health effects of smoking.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Representatives of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) met Tuesday with residents who have lived in or near Delaware County properties contaminated with radiation. The agency, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, met with the residents in a series of private consultations at the Beverly Hills Middle School in Upper Darby. The consultations were meant to give residents an opportunity to discuss their health concerns with doctors and health officials, according to Mike Greenwell, an ATSDR spokesman.
NEWS
January 9, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials at a Bucks County laboratory said yesterday that there were "no serious health effects" associated with contaminated well water at the Margaret M. Seylar Elementary School in Hilltown Township. The Pennridge School District has been supplying bottled drinking water and hand wipes at Seylar - which serves students in kindergarten through sixth grade - since classes resumed last week. On Dec. 26, workers rebuilding the school, on Callowhill Road off Route 113, found some of their trailers had been broken into and empty containers of window cleaner and the solvent Grease Be Gone scattered near the opened well.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co., under investigation for the alleged failure to report health information on a chemical used to make Teflon and other nonstick plastics, will likely be subject to "formal action" soon, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday. The chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, has been found in drinking water near the West Virginia plant where DuPont makes Teflon, and small amounts have been found in samples from blood banks nationwide. No health effects have been confirmed in humans, but the chemical, also known as C-8, has been linked to several cancers and undersized pituitary glands in lab animals.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The "infinitesimally small amounts" of pharmaceuticals in Philadelphia's drinking water should not pose a health hazard, the city's water commissioner said yesterday, but he acknowledged that the health effects of the drugs remain largely unknown. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency still trying to understand what the presence of minuscule amounts of drugs in U.S. water supplies means for humans and wildlife, City Council yesterday asked the Water Department to explain why more substances turned up in Philadelphia than other areas.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK 'GENERATION X' UNHAPPY WITH SEX Americans in their 20s, dubbed "Generation X" because of their indefinability, are not happy with their sex lives, according to a magazine survey released yesterday. The survey of 2,500 respondents, conducted by Details and Mademoiselle magazines, also found that two-thirds of men have changed their sexual behavior because of AIDS, but that only 37 percent of women have done so. The survey said that 43 percent of men said they were dissatisfied with the sex they were having and one-third of women said they rarely or never have orgasms during sex. ATLANTA SCIENTISTS KNOW LITTLE ON WASTES Scientists conceded yesterday they don't know how much exposure to hazardous waste or even everyday chemicals causes illness.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Laura Quinn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Within the next few months, Gloucester County is expected to complete the first statistical study on possible health effects of the closed Lipari Landfill in Mantua. The study, long awaited by people who live near the landfill, will look at the rate of cancer, miscarriages, low birth weights, birth defects and school absenteeism in four municipalities. "I don't see how we could have a landfill with three million gallons of chemicals . . . and not have health problems," said Harry Lindsay, a Pitman resident and a member of the Pitman Alcyon Lipari Landfill Community Association (PALLCA)
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | by Michelle Malkin
Carol Browner - 1997's "Outstanding Mother of the Year" and one of Cosmopolitan magazine's "Fun, Fearless Females" of 1998 - racked up another honor last week. The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency received the D.C.-based American Lung Association's President's Award "for her leadership in the fight for clean air. " How ironic. "Fun" and "fearless" she may be, but Browner has probably done as much to pollute the nation's political air as all of the back-yard barbecues and lawn mowers in the United States combined.
NEWS
February 4, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Without seeking a permit or state approval, Washington Township officials pumped millions of gallons of water from a radium-tainted well into a stream that feeds two recreational lakes before and after they learned that the well was contaminated, a municipal engineer said last night. The engineer, Joseph Federici, said that up to a total of 120,000gallons had been pumped into Scotland Run on two occasions since tests had shown Jan. 13 that the well was contaminated with unsafe levels of radium.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Stacey Burling and Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writers
Nearly three years after Hurricane Sandy devastated New Jersey, its effects linger in the form of heightened anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, a report released Wednesday found. More attention should be paid to the emotional consequences of housing damage, including mold, the report stated. Surprisingly, children who lived in homes with minor damage were even more likely than those in homes with major damage to feel sad or depressed or have trouble sleeping. "We're definitely still hearing about the issues and the problems," said David Abramson, a New York University researcher who led the Sandy Child and Family Health Study.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
When Annmarie Cantrell, a chef and wellness educator, gives cooking demonstrations, she always talks about the importance of fresh, unprocessed food and her concerns about genetically engineered ingredients. She and her husband, Sam, no longer plant corn on their Maysie's Farm in Chester County, in part because she worries their organically grown crop will be contaminated by windblown pollen from nearby farms that grow genetically engineered corn. She and other members of a fledgling local group, GMO Free PA, are fully behind legislation that would require labeling of foods containing genetically modified organisms that are sold in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Frederic J. Frommer, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A federal judge on Tuesday ordered tobacco companies to publish corrective statements that say they lied about the dangers of smoking and that disclose smoking's health effects, including the death on average of 1,200 people a day. U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler previously had said she wanted the industry to pay for corrective statements in various types of advertisements. But Tuesday's ruling is the first time she's laid out what the statements will say. Each corrective ad is to be prefaced by a statement that a federal court has concluded that the defendant tobacco companies "deliberately deceived the American public about the health effects of smoking.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
WASHINGTON - A federal judge on Tuesday ordered tobacco companies to publish corrective statements that say they lied about the dangers of smoking and which disclose smoking's health effects, including the death on average of 1,200 people a day. U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler previously had said that she wanted the industry to pay for corrective statements in various types of advertisements. But Tuesday's ruling is the first time she's laid out what the statements will say. Each corrective ad is to be prefaced by a statement that a federal court has concluded that the defendant tobacco companies "deliberately deceived the American public about the health effects of smoking.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
The searchlights over the Benjamin Franklin Parkway have gone dark. The three-week Open Air show by Montreal artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer is packing up. But the issue of light pollution that simmered throughout is still with us. It is of concern not only to astronomers, but to others who feel the bejeweled dark sky is an important part of living on Earth and being human. The lofty realm has inspired us to write poetry, compose music, ponder the existence of God, and fall in love.
NEWS
October 30, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Preliminary results of air-quality monitoring outside Paulsboro High School indicate no short-term health threat to students from heavy-metals pollution, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Paulsboro is near several refineries in Gloucester County. The EPA released its findings yesterday, based on two months of testing that began in August. The EPA cautioned that it still was analyzing whether there are long-term effects. The agency said it was not ready to release a report on whether volatile organic compounds, another type of toxin, were found in excessive amounts near the school.
NEWS
March 28, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the plumes of radioactive material wafted over farms, homes, schools and parks around Three Mile Island, waves of fear and dread spread through the region. Within three days after the March 28 accident, people reported classic symptoms of radiation sickness - they vomited, they felt nauseous, their hair fell out. Pets and farm animals died unexpectedly. But no radiation escaped until the fourth day of the crisis, say independent physicists with the Union of Concerned Scientists.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The "infinitesimally small amounts" of pharmaceuticals in Philadelphia's drinking water should not pose a health hazard, the city's water commissioner said yesterday, but he acknowledged that the health effects of the drugs remain largely unknown. With the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency still trying to understand what the presence of minuscule amounts of drugs in U.S. water supplies means for humans and wildlife, City Council yesterday asked the Water Department to explain why more substances turned up in Philadelphia than other areas.
NEWS
August 13, 2006 | By Sandy Bauers, Jan Hefler and Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Janice Reale isn't buying it. She's a little relieved that her daughter, Anastasia, 6, tested "on the low end" for mercury exposure among the 60 former Kiddie Kollege day-care center children. But she works in insurance claims, and she's worried about long-term health implications. Often, she said, "somebody works at a job and 10 years later they come down with cancer. . . . That's what's going to happen to our kids. " After the Franklin Township day-care center closed July 28, 60 children and nine adults were tested to determine the extent of their exposure to mercury vapors at the property, a former thermometer factory that was mistakenly dropped from a list of New Jersey's contaminated sites, an error now being investigated by the State Attorney General's Office.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2004 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co., under investigation for the alleged failure to report health information on a chemical used to make Teflon and other nonstick plastics, will likely be subject to "formal action" soon, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday. The chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, has been found in drinking water near the West Virginia plant where DuPont makes Teflon, and small amounts have been found in samples from blood banks nationwide. No health effects have been confirmed in humans, but the chemical, also known as C-8, has been linked to several cancers and undersized pituitary glands in lab animals.
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