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Health Food

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NEWS
September 7, 2005
Editor's note: A version of this editorial appeared in an early edition of Monday's Inquirer. Ah, the joy of it all: Sitting in a Starbucks last week, sipping an espresso macchiato and spotting a news story that proclaims that coffee has far more antioxidants than anything else we eat or drink. Antioxidants, of course, are the Patriot missiles of our internal system, seeking out and neutralizing so-called free radicals that can damage cells and hence make us vulnerable to a host of chronic diseases.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Two days after the event - which was Monday in the East Room of the White House - you could find Xeroxes of the news photos of Marco Lentini, 34, with President Obama taped to the windows of Lentini's GiĆ  Pronto panini-and-salad shops, one of which is on the ground floor of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, the other (the more hopping of the two, given the state of the stock market) on 38th at Spruce, which fills up at lunchtime with Penn students who aren't in the mood for the Korean or Caribbean being dispensed from the gaggle of curbside trucks.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | By Nicole Pensiero, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Anne Marie Brambilla opened her health food store on Berlin Road 22 years ago, she never dreamed the business would turn her into something of an herbal expert. "At the time, I was eager to go into business for myself, and I thought that health food was an area that would really start opening up," Brambilla, 62, recalled. "As my business grew, I got more and more involved in learning about herbs and nutrition. I took classes, did a lot of reading, and really put my heart into it. " And now, Brambilla says her shop, the Shadyside Country Store, has the largest stock of natural herbs in this region.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
You've probably seen those metal security gates that seem to cover every store in Center City at night. But did you ever notice that certain kinds of stores never seem to have them? Like shoe stores. And bookstores. And health-food stores. You'll rarely see a health-food store with a metal gate. According to Officers Mike Beukers and Bill Frazier, partners in a burglary detail in the 6th Police District in Center City, most of the thieves who break store windows are going after stuff they can sell quickly on the street.
FOOD
March 2, 1988 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Yogurt, rice cakes, bran and carob were once viewed as odd foods eaten only by hippies and eccentrics - the people who frequented the remote "health- food" stores. Now, virtually every supermarket in the land sells those basics of wholesome eating. So now that health food has gone mainstream, what has become of those pioneering health-food stores? They, too, have changed. As they drew more people through their doors, health-food stores were faced with the choice of turning away these new customers or catering to their needs.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | By Claude Lewis
It seems that restaurants take turns in serving up food that sickens the public. Last week, about 1,650 Burger King restaurants were forced to suspend selling their primary product, hamburgers, until a new source for meat could be found. Years ago, I seriously considered purchasing a fast-food franchise, and none seemed better than one of the most successful - and profitable - companies known around the world. I trained for nearly a year, learning a great deal about the business and performing every task: preparing food, working the grill, running the counter, sweeping the floors and wiping tables, and nearly everything else that goes into running a successful fast-food operation.
FOOD
October 2, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
"People who are concerned about health are people who enjoy living well," says John Zagara. Which explains why Zagara's, a market catering to the young, affluent, well-educated population of the Marlton-Cherry Hill area, offers natural foods, including macrobiotic take-out items, side by side with fashionable specialty foods like croissants and fancy cakes. At 18,000 square feet, the market, which opened in September, may be the largest of its kind in the country; it is certainly one of the most luxuriously appointed.
FOOD
July 5, 1992 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At It's Only Natural in Rockledge, a banner stretched across the health- food store's front reads: "It's BAR-B-QUE time. " Inside, owner Rhonda Winokur has stacked her shelves with picnic fare: Fat-free tofu hot dogs. Tempeh. Veggie burgers. Tofu bologna. Soya cheese. Multigrain buns. "We literally sell out by the weekend," Winokur said. Customer Dorlyn Law picks out organically grown plums at the Montgomery County store. When she and her friend Frank McLaughlin pack a picnic, they stuff Tupperware with fruits and vegetables - preferably grown without chemicals - and fresh, home-baked muffins and bread, Law said.
FOOD
June 1, 1994 | By Robin Benzle, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you thought those scenes in the TV show The Bionic Woman, showing Lindsay Wagner effortlessly springing over a 10-foot wall or running 50 m.p.h. up the side of a mountain in stylish heels were the result of special-effects camera work, I've got news for you. It might be that she could handle all this action because Lindsay Wagner is into health food in a big way, and has been for some time. In a nutshell, she doesn't eat any kind of meat, poultry or fish. Milk products are also taboo.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Moshe Malka is out to change the reputation of health food. He knows most people can't regularly deny the bacchanalian demands of their taste buds to serve the boring concerns of their arteries. He knows that if it's a toss-up between a cheesesteak and fries or a tofu-and-sprout salad, most of us will go for the flavor, despite our best intentions. Malka wants us to have it both ways. And with business apparently booming at Moshe's, the health-food company he started here almost five years ago, the 48-year-old Israeli emigre is trying to spread the message that good-for-you food actually can taste good.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 18, 2015 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
On busy weekday evenings in one household in Princeton, the kids are just as likely to be cooking dinner as their parents. Emily and Lyla Allen, twin sixth-graders, have culinary skills and ambitions far beyond their 11 years. Whereas most tweens favor kid-friendly classics like burgers or grilled cheese, Emily and Lyla prefer vegetables. The sisters became vegetarian (like their mom) after a farm trip during which they learned that their favorite long-eye-lashed cow would soon be butchered for meat.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
They say one healthy choice leads to another. So it seemed fitting that I discovered a health-food store on the way home from my new gym. The store is Health & Harmony, and to pass through its doors is to enter the rabbit hole of rabbit food. I don't mean Kashi cereal or that Greek yogurt John Stamos sells. Uncle Jesse is for amateurs. This was some next-level, Goop.com kind of stuff. The dairy aisle isn't hemmed in by the confines of a cow. There's almond milk, coconut milk, soy milk, Tofutti cream cheese, anything but milk from a mammal.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A KNIFE-WIELDING robber tried to bilk Sharon Doyle out of a hard day's pay at Stan's Health Food, her store on Frankford Avenue near Wellington Street in Mayfair, police said. But he didn't realize that Doyle, 46, spent more than a decade working in law enforcement, including stints in the Philadelphia Police Department and the Secret Service. He also didn't know that he had brought a knife to a gunfight. And he ended up in the morgue with a bullet in his chest from Doyle's .38-caliber revolver, according to police.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
WRITER/producer Laurie David has a new anti-sugar movie, "Fed Up," opening tomorrow, and has written a cookbook ( The Family Cooks ) to go with it. We sat down with David recently to talk about her crusade against sugar and processed food, and her complementary campaign to get American families back in the habit of cooking together, eating together and having fun in the kitchen. Q: "Fed Up" identifies sugar as a cause of obesity and chronic illness, singling out culprits like soda.
FOOD
September 27, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
As the leisurely rhythms of summer give way to the more frantic routines of fall, those responsible for feeding a family have the challenge of navigating mealtimes around multiple schedules. I have always felt, and research bears out, that sitting down to eat, even for a few minutes, is better than eating in front of the fridge, or in the backseat of the car. Sit-down meals with others promote better eating habits, better relationships, and even better grades. So how can a busy family manage to eat healthy home-cooked meals here in the real world of competing priorities and overfilled schedules?
NEWS
November 30, 2012
IF YOU STARTED November as a junk-food junkie, it was kind of a rough month. Papa John's threatened a 14-cent-per-pizza hike. A Denny's franchise (soon contradicted by the parent company) promised a similar 5 percent surcharge. And Hostess, in a fight over union benefits, pulled the plug entirely. All just after President Obama's re-election. Geez, does first lady Michelle Obama's healthier-foods crusade really wield so much clout? If only. Whether economic outcry or postelection posturing, these blips won't budge the monolith of U.S. junk food.
FOOD
September 20, 2012 | By Monica Eng, Chicago Tribune
Does a healthy diet cost more than a junk-food diet in America? That depends on whom you ask, how you measure food and, most important, if you know how to cook. This year the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a new analysis indicating that fruits, vegetables, grains and low-fat milk tend to be less expensive by weight and serving size than fatty, sugary foods and meat, fish, and poultry. The takeaway message, according to its authors: Healthful foods actually cost less than foods we are supposed to restrict.
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Turns out it's possible to make a fast-food lunch a bit healthier even without skipping the fries. New York City now has hard evidence that its ban on trans fat in restaurant food made a meaningful dent in people's consumption of the artery clogger and wasn't just replaced with another bad fat. The findings published Tuesday have implications beyond heart health, suggesting another strategy to curb the nation's obesity epidemic fueled...
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX - A federal trial began yesterday for an Indiana man accused of forcing his grandsons to hike for miles in the Grand Canyon without food or water in brutal August heat. Investigators have said that Christopher Alan Carlson of Indianapolis told them that the boys were overweight and that he thought hiking the Grand Canyon would help get them into shape. Carlson, who is in his mid-40s, has pleaded not guilty to six counts of child abuse. The criminal complaint against Carlson said the boys told investigators that Carlson hit, pushed and choked them repeatedly and kicked them with his steel-toed boots, and also forced their fingers down their throats to make them vomit during trips into the Grand Canyon.
NEWS
January 20, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
I've never met Allan Borushek - "The Calorie King" - but he's usually with me wherever I go. His handy little book fits nicely in my purse, helping me decide when to resist tasty temptations and when to give in and chow down. If I'm stumped, I gaze at his wise eyes and mustard-yellow crown and ask, "What would The King do?" To make myself feel extra awful, I also consult Eat This, Not That , from Men's Health magazine's best-selling "food swap" series. (I got it from a friend who spent her teen years making me Butterfinger Blizzards - 105 percent of daily saturated fat!
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