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Health Hazard

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NEWS
November 7, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Less than an hour north of here, on a reservation that bleeds across the Missouri River from Nebraska into Iowa, the Omaha Indians are making Omaha brand cigarettes in the building that once housed their fitness club and wellness center. Down in northeastern Oklahoma, the Seneca-Cayuga Indians last week were poised to start their Seneca cigarettes rolling off an assembly line that ultimately could produce 300,000 cartons a month. And in Washington state, the Squaxin Island Indians have applied for federal approval to begin making Skookun Creek cigarettes.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
The Philadelphia Water Department reported Monday the appearance of rusty water in University City and urged customers to limit the use of the water while the utility cleans the system. The department said the rusty water is not a health hazard, but it is a nuisance. Once the system is cleared, customers should run cold water through their pipes to remove any accumulated rust. Customers with questions can call the department's hotline at 215-685-6300.    - Robert Moran
NEWS
April 7, 2010
AS THE PARENT of a child at Friere Charter School, I had to read your article about the nearby contamination twice to be sure I understood because it made me so angry. I was surprised to read that Mayor Nutter is the Redevelopment Authority chairman. I voted for Nutter, and did so because he constantly spoke of helping the children in the city, and how he understood because he has a daughter. I am sure that Nutter is aware of this problem, so my question is why is he allowing children to go to school with this building as its neighbor, while there are so many reports deeming this building a health hazard?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If "Licence to Kill" left you with a compelling urge to smoke, then you didn't stick around for the closing credits. The credits included the Surgeon General's famous warning about the hazards of smoking - the first time it's ever been added to a commercial movie. The warning is a meant to counter the fact that James Bond smokes quite a few cigarettes during the course of the film. The pressure for the producers to add the Surgeon General's warning reportedly came from the Justice Department at the urging of an anti-smoking congressman from Ohio named Thomas A. Luken, who has said he is crusading to "reduce cigarette smoking to zero.
NEWS
January 6, 1987
I'd like to add my voice to that of Susan Boyer (Letters to the Editor, Dec. 28) in protesting the surgeon general's obvious bias against and cavalier disregard for a large segment of this country's population, i.e. smokers. If he has determined to his satisfaction that smoking constitutes a health hazard and has duly warned us of it, then I believe he has done his job. But he has undertaken a crusade against smokers and has encouraged a national persecution of us so that we are rapidly becoming second-class citizens.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
THE HARDEST thing I ever did was to quit smoking 12 years ago. I'm from the generation where we were not told of any health hazard until we were hooked on the powerful nicotine and tar combination. When faced with quitting smoking or finding less strenuous work, I finally got the message that my body ran better on clean air, just like my car. I can sympathize with those who continue to smoke in spite of all the knowledge we have of the toxic effects. They cough, stink and invite cancer and heart and lung disease.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Tredyffrin/Easttown School District has decided to clear the air and ban smoking in its buildings. With the ban, which would become effective July 1, Tredyffrin/Easttown will be the last of the 12 school districts in Chester County to become smoke-free. "The evidence is clear that it is in the public and students' best interest that we have a nonsmoking environment in public situations like our schools," Superintendent Theodore Foot said. He said the board policy committee had been reviewing the current nonsmoking policy, adopted in 1987 and revised in 1989.
NEWS
August 18, 2009
There's nothing like spending a leisurely summer day at the Jersey Shore. Sitting on a crowded beach, squishing your toes in the hot sand. Watching the tide roll in. And enjoying a refreshingly clean breeze gently blowing in from the Atlantic Ocean. Suddenly, the idyllic atmosphere drastically changes when an intruder arrives. Not a flock of pesky seagulls rummaging for food, or rowdy tourists blaring loud music. Worse than that - a smoker! In the time that it takes to light up, take a puff, and send smoke swirling downwind, a perfectly planned beach day has been polluted and ruined.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marianne Robinson had handed 100 cats through the window of her screenless back door by 2 p.m. yesterday, and dozens of healthy, sleek-coated animals were still inside the woman's home in Bellmawr. It was moving day for Robinson's 175-odd pets. A Thursday court order declaring a health hazard required her to get rid of all but two of her cats - each of them named, and all of them, according to animal control officers, well-cared-for. For Robinson, who would not talk to reporters and who, for privacy's sake, insisted that animal officers take the cats from her back door, it apparently was a trying experience.
NEWS
June 7, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Karen Loveland spent her lunch hour yesterday at Love Park, nibbling on forbidden fruit. Well, not fruit, exactly: Lunch was a big Greek salad that Loveland brought from her Bala Cynwyd home that morning. But it certainly was soon to be forbidden. Yesterday was the last day people could eat or bring food to the park before police start enforcing a food ban at the site at 15th Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard. It's an effort to curb what city officials term a health hazard - a rat population that has flourished on the edible debris left from nocturnal food giveaways for the homeless.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: What if the person you need to forgive is yourself? I bullied my younger sister as a kid/teen, and as a grown thirty-something, I feel incredible shame and guilt. I have apologized to her as an adult, which she seemed to have accepted, and I know much of it stemmed from being bullied and abused throughout those years myself. However, I can't seem to get past how I contributed to a lousy childhood for my sister - someone for whom I would now do anything and who will barely speak to me and the rest of our family.
NEWS
October 2, 2012
The Philadelphia Water Department reported Monday the appearance of rusty water in University City and urged customers to limit the use of the water while the utility cleans the system. The department said the rusty water is not a health hazard, but it is a nuisance. Once the system is cleared, customers should run cold water through their pipes to remove any accumulated rust. Customers with questions can call the department's hotline at 215-685-6300.    - Robert Moran
NEWS
April 7, 2010
AS THE PARENT of a child at Friere Charter School, I had to read your article about the nearby contamination twice to be sure I understood because it made me so angry. I was surprised to read that Mayor Nutter is the Redevelopment Authority chairman. I voted for Nutter, and did so because he constantly spoke of helping the children in the city, and how he understood because he has a daughter. I am sure that Nutter is aware of this problem, so my question is why is he allowing children to go to school with this building as its neighbor, while there are so many reports deeming this building a health hazard?
NEWS
August 18, 2009
There's nothing like spending a leisurely summer day at the Jersey Shore. Sitting on a crowded beach, squishing your toes in the hot sand. Watching the tide roll in. And enjoying a refreshingly clean breeze gently blowing in from the Atlantic Ocean. Suddenly, the idyllic atmosphere drastically changes when an intruder arrives. Not a flock of pesky seagulls rummaging for food, or rowdy tourists blaring loud music. Worse than that - a smoker! In the time that it takes to light up, take a puff, and send smoke swirling downwind, a perfectly planned beach day has been polluted and ruined.
NEWS
May 7, 2009
WHO'S READY FOR health-care reform? How about the 45 million people (including nine million children) who lack health insurance? Or the millions who have it now but who may not if they lose their jobs? Don't forget millions more who have health insurance but can't count on it to cover them in an actual health-care crisis. Among them surely are 2.3 million people in Pennsylvania who will spend more than 10 percent of their pre-tax income on health care this year. A survey by Families USA, a health-care- advocacy organization, says that 88 percent of these Pennsylvanians have health insurance.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Erika Gebel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Protests aside, there may be another reason to pass on the foie gras. Scientists report that these livers of overstuffed waterfowl contain abnormal proteins that, when fed to laboratory mice, caused them to quickly develop the protein clumps themselves. Various human diseases - among them Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and rheumatoid arthritis - are associated with these clumps, known as amyloids. The new paper, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides no direct evidence that people are in danger.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Erika Gebel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Protests aside, there may be another reason to pass on the foie gras. Scientists report that these livers of overstuffed waterfowl contain abnormal proteins that, when fed to laboratory mice, caused them to quickly develop the protein clumps themselves. Various human diseases - among them Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and rheumatoid arthritis - are associated with these clumps, known as amyloids. The new paper, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides no direct evidence that people are in danger.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
THE HARDEST thing I ever did was to quit smoking 12 years ago. I'm from the generation where we were not told of any health hazard until we were hooked on the powerful nicotine and tar combination. When faced with quitting smoking or finding less strenuous work, I finally got the message that my body ran better on clean air, just like my car. I can sympathize with those who continue to smoke in spite of all the knowledge we have of the toxic effects. They cough, stink and invite cancer and heart and lung disease.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An environmental consultant has released a report supporting a county finding that construction of a sewer line could prevent overflowing septic systems from contaminating residential wells in a tightly packed 880-home development in the Pinelands. Because the development, Presidential Lakes, sits in a strictly regulated area of the environmentally sensitive Pinelands, construction of the sewer line is contingent on proof of a public health hazard. The consultant's report, released this week, accompanies a study of 40 private wells in Presidential Lakes and came six months after the Burlington County Health Department said a sewer line should replace septic systems that appear to be overflowing at higher-than-normal rates.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Operation Scoop, the campaign by City Councilwoman Joan Krajewski to educate dog owners about cleaning up after their pets, is moving forward. In recent weeks, at Krajewski's urging, Health Department inspectors have begun ticketing people who let their dogs defecate in parks, on sidewalks and in neighbors' yards, and then leave the mess for someone else to step in. "We have to get tough," she said. The fine is $25, and for repeat offenses, it can go as high as $300. "It's difficult," said Bill Ferraro, the Health Department official in charge of Operation Scoop.
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