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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
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NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
In its second ruling in three years upholding President Obama's health-care law, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday turned back challengers' claims that the law barred health insurance subsidies to millions in 34 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The 6-3 opinion, written by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., upheld a central pillar of the Affordable Care Act and allows the administration's five-year-old initiative to get health coverage to more Americans. The decision lifted a cloud that threatened to end coverage for millions of Americans, disrupt state insurance markets, and pressure politicians whose constituents receive the subsidies to find a way to save them.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrats celebrated. Republicans fumed. And while some promised to continue fighting to kill President Obama's signature health law after Thursday's defeat at the Supreme Court, others in the GOP said it was time to try other tactics, at least until they can take back the White House. "As long as there's a president named Obama, the health-care law will not be repealed," said Rep. Charlie Dent (R., Pa.). "We're going to have to deal with the law as it is, and try to make changes wherever and however we can. " Democrats, by contrast, gleefully celebrated a win that protects Obama's Affordable Care Act. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.)
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
SIX YEARS AGO, Lisa Longo of Phoenixville lobbied as an activist for President Obama's Affordable Care Act, known popularly as "Obamacare. " Today, the 50-year-old single mom, who works as an independent management consultant, depends on it. Without the $200-a-month subsidy she receives on the health insurance she buys through the government's marketplace, her 19-year-old daughter would lose access to doctors she's seen for the last decade, and...
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Before the Affordable Care Act, it wasn't unusual for people in the LGBT community to be locked out of health insurance. Insurers could legally deny coverage based on a person's sexual orientation, gender identity, or pre-existing health condition. "It was everything from trans men and women being denied health coverage because their health history was confusing to a hospital or an insurance company, to young LGBT people not being able to afford coverage," said Brian Sims, a Pennsylvania state representative, lawyer, and LGBT civil rights activist.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
When Ilana Valinsky got her 2015 calendar, she flipped to May and circled the 18th, the day she would receive her master's degree in social work from the University of Pennsylvania. "I'm the graduation speaker for my class," she said last week, taking a break from polishing her speech. "That's where my focus is. " Valinsky's focus shifts this week to finding a job and health insurance. Covered by a school plan through July 31, Valinsky doesn't want to risk being uninsured for a day. And for good reason: seven years ago, her mother died from breast cancer.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Reena Khan got health insurance the day before giving birth to her daughter. The 26-year-old had lost her job-based insurance three weeks earlier. She said her employer let her go when she couldn't continue working as a home health aide because she was pregnant. Desperate, Khan called the Pennsylvania Health Access Network, a statewide nonprofit that helps people find affordable health insurance. "I didn't want to be without insurance for me and my baby," said Khan, a Pakistani native who immigrated to the United States five years ago and settled with her family in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
For Pat O'Brien, Feb. 15 was just another winter Sunday. The Huntingdon Valley nurse had always had job-based health insurance. So she didn't realize Feb. 15 was the last day to buy Affordable Care Act marketplace coverage for 2015. But on that unseasonably warm day, O'Brien and her husband, Joe, a retired police officer, needed health insurance. Two weeks earlier, O'Brien had lost her job, and with it, their benefits. "I had no idea, because I didn't need it," said O'Brien, 60. "I've had insurance my whole life.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
People who paid a penalty because they didn't buy health insurance last year are nearing the end of their options to get covered and avoid an even bigger penalty next tax season. The special enrollment period - a window the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services opened for people who learned of the fine only when they filed their 2014 taxes - closes Thursday. After that, current rules allow consumers to buy insurance from the marketplace only if they experience a life-changing event, such as marriage or loss of job-based coverage.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
In some ways, health insurance is like car insurance. Both are designed to protect you from the financial risk of repair associated with body damage. But unlike a car insurance policy that comes with bumper-to-bumper protection, nongroup health insurance doesn't cover your grille. Dental insurance has always been a separate purchase from medical health insurance. "A lot of this is a legacy in terms of historically how dental insurance came to be," says Marko Vujicic, chief economist and vice president of the American Dental Association's Health Policy Institute.
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