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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
  On the day the Philadelphia teachers' contract expires, the school district and union negotiators were expected to return to the bargaining table Saturday to continue tense negotiations that both sides say have shown little progress. "We're still very far apart," Deborah Willig, a union lawyer said after 13 hours of bargaining were wrapping up Friday night. "Every proposal the district has made is to take something away. " The financially struggling district is seeking $103 million in concessions from the union, which represents 15,000 teachers, secretaries, counselors, nurses, and aides.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leadership of the Philadelphia teachers union has proposed a one-year salary freeze and changes in health insurance coverage for its members to help the school district save millions and avert a financial crisis. But the union is adamantly against any wage cuts, said Jerry Jordan, president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Jordan declined to say how much the district could save or whether it would be anywhere near the $103 million in concessions the district is demanding.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
What a difference a year - and a major overhaul - makes. By Saturday afternoon it appeared the first day of the second open enrollment for coverage under the Affordable Care Act had gone smoothly - a sharp contrast to last year's disastrous rollout of the website healthcare.gov. People in Southeastern Pennsylvania will have two more insurers and many more plans to choose from this year. Joining ACA veterans Independence Blue Cross and Aetna are UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest health insurer, and Assurant Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2014
HAPPY DAYS are here again, right? Stocks are up, the recession is over and employment continues to grow (though wages remain stagnant). Perhaps it's a renewed optimism over employment growth - or is it apathy over stagnant wages? - that kept two-thirds of U.S. voters from even bothering to vote last week. You may be asking what the Pennsylvania governor's race had to do with your fitness and health. Quite a bit, if you ask me. Gubernatorial elections have a real impact on our day-to-day lives.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
All right, Republicans, here's your chance to help us on the tax front. Congress has not passed any of more than 50 tax provisions that have already expired in 2014. But it has the ability to pass what are referred to as "extenders" for the 2014 tax season. Delays in these extenders could postpone the start of the 2014 tax season, causing financial complications for millions of Americans, says Sandra G. Johnson, president of the National Conference of CPA Practitioners. "Once again, the American public is asked to wait on Congress to pass the extenders.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA and its largest union avoided a regionwide transit strike by postponing the day of reckoning on two major issues that will resurface soon: pensions and health-care contributions. "I don't know whether I'm getting trick or treat," SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey said as he arrived on Halloween night for the final hours of negotiations at an Old City hotel. In the end, he got both. By settling on a two-year contract Friday instead of a five-year pact, SEPTA and Transport Workers Union Local 234 gave themselves - and their one million daily riders - a reprieve from a strike.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
RECOGNIZING the needs of Chinese and other Asian-American communities in Philadelphia, Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley yesterday announced a significant state grant to help build the Eastern Tower Community Center, a long-awaited project just north of Chinatown. Standing at a podium at the 10th Street Plaza, a renovated concrete park hugged by rumbling traffic at 10th and Vine streets, Cawley told Chinatown community leaders, local and state politicians and others sitting in folding chairs that the state will provide a $3.7 million Economic Growth Initiative grant toward the project.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looking to better manage health-care costs, the Nutter administration is taking two big swings at tobacco. Come Jan. 1, Philadelphia will add a $500 annual premium to benefits costs for nonunion employees who use tobacco products, and a $15 surcharge for prescriptions filled at pharmacies that sell tobacco products. The charge on prescription co-pays is part of a plan being launched by the city in partnership with CVS Caremark, a pharmacy benefits provider owned by the parent company of CVS drug stores.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | BY ADAM SCHICKEDANZ & NEAL HALFON
PARENTHOOD should be affordable in this country, but the cost of raising a child from birth to adulthood is now a quarter of a million dollars and projected to double by the time today's toddlers reach their teens. Will having kids soon be out of reach economically for many American families? A recent report from the Center for American Progress found that middle-class families are feeling an unprecedented economic squeeze - caught between stagnating wages and the exploding cost of basics like housing, health care and children's education.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A U.S. bankruptcy judge's decision last week to allow the Trump Taj Mahal Casino in Atlantic City to jettison a traditional defined-benefit pension and company-sponsored health insurance could spell the end of historically solid benefits for low-paid casino workers. Unite Here Local 54, the union targeted by Trump Entertainment Inc., Taj Mahal's parent company, said every worker in Atlantic City is under siege by billionaire investor Carl Icahn, who controls Trump Entertainment through the roughly $290 million of debt he holds.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Deborah Fasoline quit smoking. The 57-year-old Bensalem truck driver had tried twice before to stop but failed. This time was different. This time she squashed her lifelong habit like a spent cigarette butt under foot. Fasoline says she has gone seven straight months without lighting up. That's one month more than the Affordable Care Act demands to expunge the up-to-50 percent tobacco surcharge on smokers' monthly premiums. So you can understand why Fasoline can't wait for the marketplace to reopen next month.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal bankruptcy judge on Friday allowed the owners of Atlantic City's bankrupt Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort to void its contract with its 1,100 union workers. Whether the $15 million in savings will be enough to keep the doors of the troubled casino open is nowhere near a sure bet. In a decision delivered in a Delaware courtroom, Judge Kevin Gross granted a request by the casino's owners, Trump Entertainment Resorts, to end the contract, cutting health and pension benefits.
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