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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Now that the Obama administration has approved Gov. Corbett's private-market alternative to Medicaid expansion - putting Pennsylvania on track to become the 27th state to provide health insurance for low-income residents under the Affordable Care Act - the next issue is how to let people know. The national advocacy group Enroll America plans to ramp up Chase, its phone-call program that reminds people about enrolling in health insurance. Enroll America found that people were 25 percent more likely to buy insurance on the Obamacare marketplace when they received three follow-up calls.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Young adults are paying as much or more in premiums for the cheapest bronze plans purchased on the Affordable Care Act marketplace as people ages 54 to 64, according to a University of Tennessee Health Science Center study. The study, published online last week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that the reverse premium age curve - premiums should be cheaper for younger people, who use less health care - is the result of how tax credit subsidies are calculated under the law. It could mean that paying the penalty for not buying insurance as required by the individual mandate would be less than the monthly premiums for those low-premium policies.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Young adults are paying as much or more in premiums for the cheapest bronze plans purchased on the Affordable Care Act marketplace as people ages 54 to 64, according to a University of Tennessee Health Science Center study. The study, published online last week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that the reverse premium age curve - premiums should be cheaper for younger people, who use less health care - is the result of how tax credit subsidies are calculated under the law. It could mean that paying the penalty for not buying insurance as required by the individual mandate would be less than the monthly premiums for those low-premium policies.
NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Now that the Obama administration has approved Gov. Corbett's private-market alternative to Medicaid expansion - putting Pennsylvania on track to become the 27th state to provide health insurance for low-income residents under the Affordable Care Act - the next issue is how to let people know. The national advocacy group Enroll America plans to ramp up Chase, its phone-call program that reminds people about enrolling in health insurance. Enroll America found that people were 25 percent more likely to buy insurance on the Obamacare marketplace when they received three follow-up calls.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
For 36 years, Daniel Wilson taught Spanish and English as a second language at Finletter Elementary School in the city's Olney section. He retired two years ago for another position - caregiver for his aging father. "I just couldn't keep up with a full-time job and doing for him," says Wilson, 60. "I'm a housekeeper and a caregiver before I'm anything else at this point. " Retirement meant Wilson needed health insurance. He decided against staying on the Philadelphia School District's Personal Choice or HMO plans through COBRA until he was 65. Instead, Wilson opted to buy Aetna's PA High Deductible 3000 HSA policy.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Ending a yearlong negotiation, the Obama administration on Thursday approved Gov. Corbett's alternative Medicaid expansion proposal, a step that could extend health-care benefits to roughly 600,000 uninsured Pennsylvanians. In what was described as a five-year demonstration project, Pennsylvania got the go-ahead to use federal money to pay private insurers to provide health care to uninsured individuals - many in low-wage jobs. The Obama administration praised Pennsylvania for joining other states that opted into the program under the Affordable Care Act. Corbett administration officials called the agreement a successful compromise.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
A RECENT COLUMN about the importance of getting your Social Security statement prompted a lot of retirement questions from readers. In turn, the questions reminded me just how complicated it is to retire these days. We chide people for not saving enough, but as one reader noted, that's almost the easy part. Trying to understand the many rules, and caveats to the rules, makes planning for retirement so difficult. Readers wanted to know about a plan by Social Security to resume paper statements.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Shirley Tax spends her days at Chinatown Medical Services fielding questions from patients who bought health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace. Most of those queries revolve around Independence Blue Cross' best-selling, silver-level Keystone HMO Proactive plan. Tax says patients signed up for the tiered plan without really understanding how it worked. So when they receive a bill they take it to Tax and ask her to explain it. "Most of them didn't have insurance before," Tax, 26, says of her clients, many of whom are immigrants.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Seven months after coverage began for people who bought health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, more are now insured and most of the nearly 10 million people who have signed up say they are satisfied with their plans. Yet now a new set of challenges looms. Will the plans be affordable, and will users know how to use tiered networks and other innovations without incurring huge bills? "The law has pretty much met the early benchmarks, but if it stopped here, I don't think anyone would declare it a success," says Larry Levitt, senior vice president for special initiatives at the Kaiser Family Foundation, which is tracking the law. The law offers new insurance options for the individual market.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
The latest attack on the Affordable Care Act - a federal court ruling that means the law is likely headed for another showdown at the U.S. Supreme Court - threatens to throw up more barriers to high-quality health care for millions of Americans. The decision, questioning the legality of federal insurance subsidies that are helping low-income workers afford coverage, would gut President Obama's landmark health-care reforms. Sure, the ruling is being decried by some legal experts as an "ultimately nonsensical reading" of the law. And the White House plans to seek a broader review by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, whose decision was contradicted by another appeals court ruling on the very same day. As a matter of principle, there is no question that a Democratic Congress, acting without a single Republican vote, intended to put health insurance within reach of most of the nation's 45 million to 50 million uninsured.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
CONTRADICTORY rulings from two federal appellate courts last week have dragged the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act back into legal uncertainty and again put its future in doubt, just as millions of Americans are beginning to realize the law's potential. Muddled language in the health-care law divided the courts. One court focused on a handful of words, the other on the law's broader language and its obvious intent - to provide health insurance to as many Americans as possible.
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