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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Terry Sullivan doesn't like the Affordable Care Act. Never will. Sullivan believes that the federal government has no business being involved in his choice of health insurance. For 28 years, that insurance was Independence Blue Cross' Special Care plan. But the plan was discontinued in 2013 because it didn't meet the ACA's qualified health plan standards. So Sullivan, of King of Prussia, went on the marketplace and bought the company's silver-tier special reserve plan. "I had no beef with the plan," says Sullivan, 60. It "was basically better than what I had before.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Toll-free phone lines were jammed, and low-income workers streamed into sign-up sites as enrollment opened Monday for expanded health insurance coverage under Medicaid. An estimated 600,000 people - most working at low-wage jobs - are eligible for Medicaid through Healthy PA, the state's alternative to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. First-day enrollment numbers were unavailable, Kait Gillis, a spokeswoman for the Department of Human Services, said at the end of the day. Even late in the day, callers to the state's toll-free line were told to call back later because of the high volume of calls.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It took Holly Phares 27 days and 20 hours to enroll in health insurance during 2013's disastrous rollout of the Affordable Care Act website. She doesn't expect a repeat of her slog through last year's cyber hell. But the choral director for Tabernacle United Church in West Philadelphia will be shopping the marketplace for a better deal rather than simply reenrolling in her Independence Blue Cross platinum PPO. "They say there are twice as many choices" in the marketplace, says Phares, 51. "I'm just not going to stick with Blue Cross.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investor Carl Icahn has agreed to lend Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc. up to $5 million to help the owner of Trump Taj Mahal Casino in Atlantic City pay its bankruptcy expenses into January. The move, described in a bankruptcy court filing Wednesday, could indicate that a deal is near to keep the Taj Mahal open. Trump has said it will close the casino Dec. 12 if its biggest union doesn't drop an appeal of an October bankruptcy ruling that stripped workers of company-sponsored health insurance.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts say it's a good time to shop around on the Affordable Care Act health insurance exchanges, which opened Nov. 15, for plans starting next year. There are now more plans and more choices. And premium increases occurred in most of the Affordable Care Act's four metallic tiers, including catastrophic policies, an Inquirer analysis of the least costly plans shows for 2015 in Southeastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Based on a 40-year-old non-smoker, Pennsylvania's lowest cost catastrophic plan rose 18.8 percent (to $247.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
What a difference a year - and a major overhaul - makes. By Saturday afternoon it appeared the first day of the second open enrollment for coverage under the Affordable Care Act had gone smoothly - a sharp contrast to last year's disastrous rollout of the website healthcare.gov. People in Southeastern Pennsylvania will have two more insurers and many more plans to choose from this year. Joining ACA veterans Independence Blue Cross and Aetna are UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest health insurer, and Assurant Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2014
HAPPY DAYS are here again, right? Stocks are up, the recession is over and employment continues to grow (though wages remain stagnant). Perhaps it's a renewed optimism over employment growth - or is it apathy over stagnant wages? - that kept two-thirds of U.S. voters from even bothering to vote last week. You may be asking what the Pennsylvania governor's race had to do with your fitness and health. Quite a bit, if you ask me. Gubernatorial elections have a real impact on our day-to-day lives.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
All right, Republicans, here's your chance to help us on the tax front. Congress has not passed any of more than 50 tax provisions that have already expired in 2014. But it has the ability to pass what are referred to as "extenders" for the 2014 tax season. Delays in these extenders could postpone the start of the 2014 tax season, causing financial complications for millions of Americans, says Sandra G. Johnson, president of the National Conference of CPA Practitioners. "Once again, the American public is asked to wait on Congress to pass the extenders.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA and its largest union avoided a regionwide transit strike by postponing the day of reckoning on two major issues that will resurface soon: pensions and health-care contributions. "I don't know whether I'm getting trick or treat," SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey said as he arrived on Halloween night for the final hours of negotiations at an Old City hotel. In the end, he got both. By settling on a two-year contract Friday instead of a five-year pact, SEPTA and Transport Workers Union Local 234 gave themselves - and their one million daily riders - a reprieve from a strike.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
RECOGNIZING the needs of Chinese and other Asian-American communities in Philadelphia, Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley yesterday announced a significant state grant to help build the Eastern Tower Community Center, a long-awaited project just north of Chinatown. Standing at a podium at the 10th Street Plaza, a renovated concrete park hugged by rumbling traffic at 10th and Vine streets, Cawley told Chinatown community leaders, local and state politicians and others sitting in folding chairs that the state will provide a $3.7 million Economic Growth Initiative grant toward the project.
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