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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The rate of Hispanic children without health insurance fell to a historic low in 2014, the first year that key parts of Obamacare took effect, but they still represent a disproportionate share of the nation's uninsured youth, according to a new study. About 300,000 Hispanic children gained insurance in 2014 from 2013, dropping the number of uninsured to 1.7 million, researchers said. Their uninsured rate fell to 9.7 percent, almost 2 percentage points below the year before. In New Jersey, one of the 10 states with the largest populations of Hispanic children, the uninsurance rate for that group was 7.0 percent, compared with 7.4 percent in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I recently graduated from college and moved in with my fiance. My parents have assumed most of the cost of our upcoming wedding after insisting we have a big, formal one. I'm still on their cellphone plan, and car and health insurance policies. I do not agree with my parents' religious or political views. However, my mother regularly sends me texts criticizing me for responding to family members' negative comments about my very general and inoffensive status updates. She says she's "disappointed," and then she and Dad threaten to not pay for the wedding.
NEWS
January 2, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The Pennsylvania Children's Health Insurance Program has posted success stories on its website as evidence of its value. There's the story of the Allegheny County mother who needed acute care for premature twins; the 217-pound 10-year-old who lost 97 pounds with medical supervision; and the Philadelphia woman who said knowing her 4-year-old had health insurance gave her peace of mind when he played outside. Despite such stories, Pennsylvania CHIP almost expired amid the legislature's inability to agree on a budget or almost anything else.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Geoffrey L. Beauchamp and Jonathan Calpas
The Affordable Care Act will impose a 40 percent excise tax on employer-sponsored health coverage that costs more than $10,200 for single and $27,500 for family coverage. This "Cadillac tax" will also hit cost-control measures that have become increasingly popular with employers and employees alike: flexible spending arrangements, health savings accounts, and on-site employer health clinics. Private employers might be able to avoid the tax by unilaterally reducing employee health benefits.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By David Lightman, McCLATCHY WASHINGTON BUREAU
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - They are connected to one another like never before. And they are as disconnected from American politics as ever. They're avid volunteers for community causes, yet most hardly seem to care about government or campaigns. They see a government that's not deserving of their trust, resistant to change, and barely caring about their needs. They don't think their vote counts. They are the young. Old enough to vote, numerous enough to pick a president or a Congress.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maria Farias has been without health insurance since 2011, when her husband lost his job. The Port Richmond resident, who is from Paraguay, relies on a public health center, where she pays $10 to see a doctor, because she doesn't think she can afford nearly $300 a month for insurance. "I'm still thinking about how I can get health insurance," Farias, 45, said Sunday at a festival celebrating the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a major event for Latino Catholics. "I'm just afraid it's not going to be as affordable as they say," Farias said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2015 | By Phil Galewitz, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The penalty for failing to have health insurance is going up, perhaps even higher than you expected. Among uninsured individuals who are not exempt from the Affordable Care Act penalty, the average household fine for not having insurance in 2015 will be $661, rising to $969 per household in 2016, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis. Individuals will pay the penalty when they complete their federal taxes the following spring. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Foundation.)
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
If you're in the individual market for health insurance and want to be covered by New Year's Day, you have until Dec. 15 to choose your plan on the Affordable Care Act exchange. Choosing a health plan is confusing, so it's understandable if you're tempted to just grab the lowest premium you can find. But don't do it. Depending on your family's income and health needs, you could come out ahead with a plan that has a higher monthly premium but that offers better coverage. That's why it's worth going over the last year's medical expenses, looking for items likely to come up again, such as prescriptions for chronic conditions.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Mauree Miller, For The Inquirer
Whether you are insured through your employer, the Obamacare marketplace, or Medicare, choosing the right plan is only the start of being a wise health-care consumer. It's now open-enrollment season for the marketplace, Medicare, and most employer plans, so you may be seeing a lot of advertising on the subject. Here are 10 tips to help you get started selecting a plan and then getting the most out of it: Read your options carefully. Even if you are choosing the same plan you had for 2015, there could be changes to it for 2016.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Cios family of Bucks County could be a living advertisement for the wonders of modern medicine: dad's double knee replacement, mom's successful treatment for thyroid cancer, their two teenage daughters' repairs of assorted sports injuries. Along with the benefits, however, comes a flip side: a never-ending array of billing and insurance complications that are growing increasingly familiar to Americans wrestling with the health-care system. There were the out-of-network radiologists who read X-rays at a cost of $75 to $95 for each of four, vision and hearing screenings that were supposed to be 100 percent covered as preventive services ($68 for each child)
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