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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Welcome to the first post-Affordable Care Act tax season, complete with new forms to fill out - the 1095-A! - and even more numbers to crunch. That is, if you bought health insurance last year on the Obamacare marketplace. "If you got a 1095-A form and you got the advance credit [subsidy], you must file a tax return," said Jackie Perlman, principal tax research analyst at H&R Block's Tax Institute. Well, not so fast. About 800,000 forms sent out by the government contained an error, the administration said Friday; it urged recipients to hold off filing for now. (More on that mess below.)
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You wouldn't buy a car without negotiating, would you? Health care is the same now. Feb. 15 is the last day to sign up for a health-insurance policy and avoid a tax penalty to Uncle Sam that could total 2 percent of your income. If you don't have coverage, today's the day. If you have insurance, there are ways to save money on your medical bills. Because, let's face it, even the new insurance isn't that affordable. Silver and bronze plans under the Affordable Care Act carry median family deductibles of roughly $2,500 and $5,100, respectively, according to data from management-consulting firm McKinsey & Co. As health-care costs shift to consumers, we need to negotiate services at fair prices.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
With this year's deadline to buy an Obamacare health plan just two days away, enrollment groups and at least one insurer are sponsoring sign-up events across the region, starting Friday and running through 10 p.m. Sunday. "You can't delay any longer," said Neil Deegan, Pennsylvania state director for Get Covered America, a nonprofit group whose goal is to get Americans covered by health insurance. "If you are without insurance, it is really important that you come out and get covered.
NEWS
February 11, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Fulfilling a campaign pledge, Gov. Wolf on Monday moved to dismantle his predecessor's alternative to Medicaid expansion and implement a traditional plan to extend health insurance to hundreds of thousands of low-income Pennsylvanians. Wolf said the "Healthy PA" alternative plan instituted by Gov. Tom Corbett was flawed, confusing some patients and leading others to lose treatment. He called his action a step "toward simplifying a complicated process and ensuring hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians have greater access to the health insurance they need.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It's not unusual for churches, community centers, even shopping malls to sponsor Affordable Care Act enrollment events. But an ACA sign-up at 11 a.m. at a Fishtown hipster bar known for its indie rock shows? Other than the 11 a.m. start - we are talking about rock musicians - it makes total sense if that's the audience you want to reach. And that is exactly the demographic Healthy Philadelphia was playing to on a recent Saturday at Johnny Brenda's, a gastropub and live music venue.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Thomas Jefferson health system is midway through what it hopes will be a transformation - improving the health of employees and then creating a new wellness model to market to area businesses. Two years ago, after its own health-care costs rose 22 percent in one year, Jefferson implemented a series of incentives to encourage its 12,000 employees to get fit, including a 15 percent discount in what employees pay for health insurance if they meet certain criteria. "We tried to introduce wellness as a culture," said Pamela Teufel, chief human resources officer.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
C HRISTIAN MORA, 38, and Brian Oliveira, 24, both of Fishtown, are co-owners of Girard Brasserie & Bruncherie, a restaurant on Girard Avenue near Marlborough Street in Fishtown. They have attracted national attention for operating a no-tip restaurant and paying their staff living wages plus health insurance, sick leave and paid vacations. I spoke with Mora. Q: How'd the idea for Girard come about? A: I'd been in the industry for 15 years and wanted my own restaurant. I'd worked with great chefs, and Brian was somebody who was talented and passionate.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Last year, Jimmy and Angela Clark bought Independence Blue Cross' best-selling silver Proactive plan. For the first time in five years, the Germantown couple had health insurance. And they loved it. Having coverage was especially important to Jimmy Clark, 62, who needs blood tests every six months to track high cholesterol. He also needs a colonoscopy every three years - something that, until last year, he pretty much had to forgo. "I got back on [a plan], and colonoscopies are free," said Clark, who got a clean bill of health.
NEWS
January 27, 2015
LAST WEEK'S Commonwealth Court ruling that overturned the school district's attempt to make teachers contribute to their health insurance was called a "very big victory" by teachers union president Jerry Jordan. It certainly is a victory for the union. The state appeals court, in a unanimous opinion, rejected the district's claim that the state-takeover law gave it the right to impose terms on the union. The ruling will save union members $54 million a year in payments they would otherwise have to make toward paying for their health insurance.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
DON TOLLEFSON took a bruising under cross-examination yesterday from the district attorney who had been champing at the bit to get to him. On the eighth day of his charity-fraud trial, the former Philly TV sportscaster underwent a stinging inquisition by Bucks County Chief Prosecutor Matt Weintraub, who got Tollefson to admit that money was transferred from his Winning Ways charity Bank of America account to his personal PNC bank account on many...
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