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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Shirley Tax spends her days at Chinatown Medical Services fielding questions from patients who bought health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace. Most of those queries revolve around Independence Blue Cross' best-selling, silver-level Keystone HMO Proactive plan. Tax says patients signed up for the tiered plan without really understanding how it worked. So when they receive a bill they take it to Tax and ask her to explain it. "Most of them didn't have insurance before," Tax, 26, says of her clients, many of whom are immigrants.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Seven months after coverage began for people who bought health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, more are now insured and most of the nearly 10 million people who have signed up say they are satisfied with their plans. Yet now a new set of challenges looms. Will the plans be affordable, and will users know how to use tiered networks and other innovations without incurring huge bills? "The law has pretty much met the early benchmarks, but if it stopped here, I don't think anyone would declare it a success," says Larry Levitt, senior vice president for special initiatives at the Kaiser Family Foundation, which is tracking the law. The law offers new insurance options for the individual market.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
The latest attack on the Affordable Care Act - a federal court ruling that means the law is likely headed for another showdown at the U.S. Supreme Court - threatens to throw up more barriers to high-quality health care for millions of Americans. The decision, questioning the legality of federal insurance subsidies that are helping low-income workers afford coverage, would gut President Obama's landmark health-care reforms. Sure, the ruling is being decried by some legal experts as an "ultimately nonsensical reading" of the law. And the White House plans to seek a broader review by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, whose decision was contradicted by another appeals court ruling on the very same day. As a matter of principle, there is no question that a Democratic Congress, acting without a single Republican vote, intended to put health insurance within reach of most of the nation's 45 million to 50 million uninsured.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
CONTRADICTORY rulings from two federal appellate courts last week have dragged the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act back into legal uncertainty and again put its future in doubt, just as millions of Americans are beginning to realize the law's potential. Muddled language in the health-care law divided the courts. One court focused on a handful of words, the other on the law's broader language and its obvious intent - to provide health insurance to as many Americans as possible.
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It took Sheena Sheard two hours on two buses, towing two children and a three-wheeled stroller, to get to St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. It would have been three buses but the trio legged out the final stretch to ensure Sheard could see her lawyer. That's right, her lawyer. Sheard was going to see Eileen Carroll at St. Christopher's to determine whether she qualified for a hardship exemption that would allow her to buy health insurance on the now-closed Affordable Care Act marketplace.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The e-mail was 138 words of frustration. Alan Brooks' wife Cherylann, a diabetic with high blood pressure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), needed health insurance she couldn't afford. And now a charity clinic, her last lifeline to care, was being forced to close, purportedly because of the Affordable Care Act. For the last four years, Brooks' family has been surviving on his Social Security disability check. While his health care is covered by Medicare, Cherylann has had to rely on the charity clinic doctors at St. Luke's South Side Medical Center in Bethlehem to monitor and treat her conditions.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
His plugged-in friends said he was a fool not to buy health insurance on the federal marketplace. Mark Gaines knew they were right. He was, after all, a 26-year-old law school graduate. But if a judge had asked him for a summation of the Affordable Care Act last fall, it would have been a one-sentence brief. "I didn't know anything about it," said Gaines, who lives in South Philadelphia and was working part-time. "I knew that it was going to make [insurance] open to everyone and make it cheaper.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Claudia Gordon spent 14 years chasing down bad boys as a Philadelphia policewoman. As a woman officer, Gordon occasionally ran into a perp who was thinking, "Whatcha gonna do?" Bad move, bad boy. "They think women are weak," said Gordon, 59, who retired in 2006. "But we're not as weak as they think. " On the street, there was no intimidating Gordon. But buying health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace - well, that rattled her. Like so many others who tried to buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last fall, Gordon had to make a couple of attempts to finally get her plan, and only then with the help of a navigator.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is getting a makeover. It wants new health ideas to go viral. It wants partners in business and government, to magnify its impact. And it seeks game-changing ideas from inventors to improve doctor visits and reshape medicine into a "culture of health. " The nation's largest health philanthropy has long been focused on discrete health problems such as smoking and obesity. But in a major policy shift publicly discussed Wednesday for the first time, the Princeton-based foundation is seeking to up its game and inspire mass movements.
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