CollectionsHealth Insurance
IN THE NEWS

Health Insurance

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
DON TOLLEFSON took a bruising under cross-examination yesterday from the district attorney who had been champing at the bit to get to him. On the eighth day of his charity-fraud trial, the former Philly TV sportscaster underwent a stinging inquisition by Bucks County Chief Prosecutor Matt Weintraub, who got Tollefson to admit that money was transferred from his Winning Ways charity Bank of America account to his personal PNC bank account on many...
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
John Gellert had health insurance for the first time last year. The self-employed Juniata resident qualified for a tax credit subsidy on the Affordable Care Act marketplace and bought Independence Blue Cross' silver tier Keystone HMO Proactive plan. He liked the plan and was ready to renew last month when he was told that he no longer qualified for a marketplace subsidy because his income was below the $16,105 federal poverty level. The marketplace representative "asked a series of questions and that's when I knew that I didn't qualify," said Gellert, 57. "That's when I said I need to look to see what I qualify for. " The deadline to have insurance for Feb. 1 is Thursday.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Christine Bergstresser has read the Affordable Care Act. OK, not all 11,588,500 words. But more of the law than most people, including - probably - some elected officials in Washington. "I have read the majority of it," says Bergstresser, 43, a certified application counselor. "Some of it you can really kind of skim through. " Certified application counselors help people enroll in Obamacare. Bergstresser volunteers for Enroll America, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization whose goal is to get Americans covered by health insurance.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
The top consumer stories of 2014? It depends on how you count and what you care about - or maybe even on where you sit. If you've been sitting, say, in the back seat of a Toyota in recent weeks - after the automaker's unusual advice to avoid the front passenger seat while waiting for back-ordered Takata airbag parts - then the year's topmost consumer story may be the series of disclosures about how the auto industry hides risky defects. Were you one of roughly 10 million Americans who gained health insurance in 2014?
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The only thing riskier than opening a cafe/art gallery in a blue-collar, Maxwell House-coffee-drinking Port Richmond neighborhood is living without health insurance. M.L. Simone has done both and is still around to talk about it. A decade ago, the 46-year-old Delaware native wanted to open a small coffee bar that doubled as a gallery where local artists could display their work. The spillover from the Northern Liberties zip code had already pushed Fishtown rents out of her reach.
NEWS
December 24, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - On her final day of voting after a decade in Congress, Allyson Y. Schwartz reflected. The Montgomery County Democrat sat in the Rayburn Room, just off the House floor, and discussed her proud moments, her future plans, and the divisions that have come to define Congress. Schwartz, 66, spoke at the end of a long congressional career that followed a stint in the state Senate and concluded after an unsuccessful run for governor of Pennsylvania this year. Buzzers rang to signal the coming votes, some of the last for her and U.S. Reps.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
For the better part of 52 years, Joseph Rosati Plumbing & Heating has offered its employees fully paid health insurance. "My father prided himself in being able to offer health benefits to his employees," says Regina Weinhardt, who, along with her brothers, Joe Jr. and Anthony, took over the company after their father died in 2007. But when the company was ready to renew its group policy last month, Weinhardt got a bad case of sticker shock - an 87 percent rate increase. Her broker was able to find Weinhardt a more affordable policy with less coverage.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the boxes of unpaid claims should have tipped off Cynthia Holloway, trustee of the Professional Industrial Trade Workers Union Health and Welfare Fund, situated in an office suite along Route 70 in Cherry Hill. All around the country - in New Jersey, Texas, Louisiana, and North Carolina - employees, presumably covered by health insurance, were going to doctors or hospitals, but their bills were not getting paid. Clearly the fund was in trouble. Financial records were missing, state insurance departments sent cease-and-desist letters, and insurance administrators were calling Holloway to tell her that the fund was not forwarding enough money to pay the claims.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
The story of West Chester investment adviser Rich Weinstein shows that sometimes even the White House is no match for one angry citizen with a fast Internet connection and plenty of determination. Last week, Weinstein's relentless archive-diving on the intellectual origins of the Obamacare health insurance law helped put MIT economist Jonathan Gruber, often hailed as an "architect" of the plan, in the dock for hours of embarrassing interrogation from the U.S. House Oversight Committee.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Terry Sullivan doesn't like the Affordable Care Act. Never will. Sullivan believes that the federal government has no business being involved in his choice of health insurance. For 28 years, that insurance was Independence Blue Cross' Special Care plan. But the plan was discontinued in 2013 because it didn't meet the ACA's qualified health plan standards. So Sullivan, of King of Prussia, went on the marketplace and bought the company's silver-tier special reserve plan. "I had no beef with the plan," says Sullivan, 60. It "was basically better than what I had before.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|