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Health Insurance

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BUSINESS
November 14, 1998 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Provident American Corp., which is developing an Internet site to sell health insurance, has agreed to sell its traditional agent-based insurance business to an Ohio company for $15 million. Central Reserve Life Insurance Co., an acquisition-minded firm in Strongsville, a suburb of Cleveland, is buying Provident American Life and Health Insurance. The Provident American Corp. subsidiary includes 27,000 agents nationwide and about 60 employees at the head office in Norristown, Peter Nauert, Central Reserve's chief executive, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2012
This is the first of Joel L. Naroff's monthly columns for The Inquirer's Sunday Business section. Obamacare! Nothing gets the blood boiling more than a discussion about this law. Is this a business and health-care system killer, or a medical-sector lifeline? While the political sound bites are strident and conflicting, economic logic makes it clear: A major health-insurance overhaul is needed, and how it is done will have huge implications for the region's economy. Once upon a time, health insurance was a popular, affordable benefit used by firms to attract and retain high-quality employees.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Geoff Mulvihill, Associated Press
A state court judge has ruled against Gov. Christie's administration for a second time in a lawsuit over whether the state can increase judges' health insurance and pension contributions. Mercer County Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg ruled Wednesday that New Jersey cannot increase judges' contributions while the case proceeds. Last week, Feinberg sided with Hudson County Superior Court Judge Paul DePascale, who sued the state over its pension and benefits overhaul. DePascale argued that the increases would diminish his salary.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
State insurance regulators yesterday warned consumers and businesses who have purchased health insurance coverage from Atlantic Healthcare and United Healthcare Benefits Trust that they should find replacement coverage from licensed companies. Both Atlantic and United are unlicensed insurance companies that have operated illegally in the Philadelphia, Reading and Allentown areas, Acting Insurance Commissioner Cynthia M. Maleski said in a statement. The Insurance Department has received complaints that United Healthcare Benefits was not paying claims and had refused to answer customer inquiries.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cost of health insurance skyrocketed in 2011 after several years of relatively small increases. Prices rose 9 percent for family coverage, with the average family premium reaching $15,073 and employees picking up $4,129 of that cost. Last year, family premium prices rose three percent. "This year's nine percent increase in premiums is especially painful for workers and employers struggling through a weak recovery," said Drew Altman, president of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation in California, in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992
Ever since Rep. Allen G. Kukovich proposed a plan for state-subsidized health insurance for poor children, it's been obvious that this is the right thing - and the smart thing - to do. It's right because thousands of Pennsylvania children do without basic preventive health care. Their parents earn too much to qualify for Medicare, yet lack job-related health insurance coverage for their families. It's smart because accessible, basic health care means healthier children. Too many kids today have to get seriously ill before desperate parents seek high-priced emergency room care.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2008
The exterior of the Corporate Synergies Group Inc. building in Mount Laurel could not be more nondescript: vanilla office park, random trees. But inside the health-insurance brokerage, it's different. It's obvious that chief executive Eric Raymond, 51, of Bala Cynwyd, had to own his own business. Otherwise, he'd have no place to display dozens of travel photographs, especially of South American monkeys. (Beats the standard hallway gallery of business patriarchs every time.
NEWS
September 5, 2007
By Matt Joyce As I slid slowly into Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's glistening, space-age MRI machine recently, preparing for a 40-minute, $1,500 procedure that would yield more than 100 images of my injured wrist, thoughts of American entrepreneurship, preventive care, and the glaring ironies of our health-care system circled through my head. Three years ago, my former college roommate, Tim Ifill, and I started a nonprofit organization called Philly Fellows. Both of us chose to forgo traditional jobs with stable salaries and benefits to build a program that we were passionate about, and that we felt would make a tangible impact on the city of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
RICHMOND, Va. - The Obama administration received a generally friendly hearing Tuesday from a panel of three Democratic appointees for its first appeals court defense of the national health-care law. Two of the three judges - Andre Davis and James Wynn Jr. - were Obama appointees, and the third, Judge Diana Motz, was a Clinton appointee. The panels are chosen randomly by computer. Lawyers for Virginia struggled to explain how the state had the legal standing to challenge the health-care mandate on behalf of its citizens.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 19, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Kate Morgan, 25, hasn't seen a doctor for a checkup since before she went to college, when she saw her pediatrician at age 18. "Nothing's bothering me, I don't have any symptoms, why go see a doctor?" reasoned Morgan, who recently moved from Voorhees, N.J. to Hummelstown, Pa. When she has needed medical care, she either went to the emergency department or visited an urgent care clinic. For now she has insurance under her dad's policy, but that's ending with her 26th birthday next week.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
An overwhelming majority of faculty in Pennsylvania's state university system voted to authorize their faculty union to call a strike when leadership deems one necessary, the union said Monday. Faculty at the 14 universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education cast their votes last week, with 82 percent of eligible faculty voting. Of those, 93 percent voted to give the leadership of the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties the authority to call a strike, the union said.
NEWS
September 8, 2016
It says a lot about the state of the Philadelphia School District that the big news on opening day is that its 130,000 students will actually have new textbooks. But given the perpetual financial crisis that the city's public schools have been mired in the last few years, just buying books is a positive development worth celebrating. After all, this is a school district that has gone several years without librarians, school nurses, guidance counselors, or assistant principals in many of its schools.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Merle DiVento and her husband, Larry, are in their 60s, but they spend a lot of time playing school, making art projects, and reading board books. It's the dream job they retired for: caring for granddaughters Gianna, 4, and Jewel, 15 months. Still, for Merle, who taught mostly kindergarten for more than 36 years, and Larry, now working at his at-home framing business around his babysitting duties - it's "exhausting. " The Mount Laurel couple wouldn't have it any other way. "Now we build our lives around theirs," said Merle, aka "Mimi," whose commute is a minutes-long car ride to their daughter's home.
NEWS
August 30, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Insurance unaffordable I am worried about proposed health-insurance rate hikes proposed for next year. Aetna has requested an 18 percent increase for its HMO, and Independence Blue Cross's Keystone Health Plan East, also an HMO, has proposed a 13 percent increase. Medical treatments are getting pricier every year, and a recent study by the University of Michigan found that patients are bearing a much larger share of that cost. According to the four-year study, deductibles rose 86 percent and coinsurance costs increased 33 percent.
NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
IF YOU HAVE never dialed 911 for an ambulance - and most of us haven't - you probably don't know that after the professional paramedics have taken you to the hospital, the city will send you a bill. A really big bill. It came as a shock to Roberto Roque, 56, who suffered a severe asthma attack four years ago while at the Asthma Center, 822 Pine St., across from Pennsylvania Hospital. Rather than risk liability by walking him across the street, the doctor called 911 to collect Roque and "drive around the block," Roque says.
NEWS
August 11, 2016
ISSUE | ABORTION Support all choices A commentary, "Rather than fund abortion, let's invest in alternatives" (Sunday), presented a false choice. We don't need to choose between respecting and supporting a woman who has decided to end her pregnancy and respecting and supporting a woman who has decided to continue her pregnancy. We can and should do both. However we feel about abortion, we can agree that politicians shouldn't force a woman to make a certain decision or stand in the way of what she decides is best for herself and her family.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Health insurers have requested rate changes -- including an increase of up to 32.3 percent -- for individual plans that will be offered this fall on New Jersey's Affordable Care Act marketplace this fall, according to data posted Monday on the federal web site HealthCare.gov. However, 12 of 19 insurance plans, effective Jan. 1, are seeking increases of less than 10 percent. The biggest requested increase was from Oxford Health Insurance Inc., a unit of UnitedHealthcare. Its Oxford NJ EPO (exclusive provider organization)
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
Saying their own costs have risen, health insurance companies made their cases to state regulators Wednesday for double-digit rate increases next year for individual policies in Pennsylvania. The requests before the Insurance Department include proposed average rate increases of 17.2 percent for Aetna Health Inc., 25.4 percent to 48.1 percent for Highmark companies, 0.9 percent to 16.2 percent for UPMC companies, and 19.9 percent to 22.5 percent for Independence Blue Cross companies, according to the department.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The special investigations unit of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey generated $43.2 million in savings last year by rooting out fraud, the Newark, N.J., health insurer said Wednesday. Horizon said one of the latest trends in fraud is the "phantom doctor's office," which are shell offices that submit bogus claims using stolen insurance identification numbers and then vanish. Another increasingly common scheme, Horizon said, is "the impossible day," on which a doctor claims to have seen dozens or even hundreds of patients.
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