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NEWS
December 9, 2012
Gov. Corbett looks more and more like a stubborn holdout against covering the health-care needs of 600,000 low-income Pennsylvanians under Obamacare. His excuse is that he needs more data on the state's costs for the safety net. Lodging similar dollars-and-cents objections Wednesday, Gov. Christie vetoed legislation that would launch an online health insurance marketplace for New Jersey residents. Christie, too, wants to crunch more numbers. All in all, on this issue, the two governors are sounding like they might fit in better in some place like the Show Me State.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
ALDOUS HUXLEY once made this chilling observation: "A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude. " I thought of this in the days after the election, as the Left and the Right started arguing about what this country will look like in four more years. Those of us who did not vote for Barack Obama fear that the 2.0 version of his administration will permanently move us from a nation of makers to a nation of takers.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Phil Galewitz, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
If you're on Medicaid and looking for a new doctor, your chances are excellent of finding one - in Wyoming. In New Jersey, not so much. About 69 percent of doctors nationally accept new Medicaid patients, but the rate varies widely across the country, according to a study published Monday in the journal Health Affairs. New Jersey had the nation's lowest rate at 40 percent, while Wyoming had the highest, 99 percent, according to a survey last year of doctors by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama, emboldened by the Supreme Court's affirmation of his health-care overhaul, is now embracing the law while campaigning for reelection, just as Republican rival Mitt Romney steps back from it. Obama sees a second chance to sell voters on the issue despite deep skepticism about it from many people. Romney is avoiding answering hard questions about how he would tackle health care, and thus missing the chance to energize voters who oppose the law. Democrats say the president always planned to stress health care if the court upheld the law. A month after the ruling, he and his team are focused on promoting individual parts of the law that have proved more popular than the sum. The campaign is targeting its efforts on important groups of voters, including women and Hispanics, who, Obama aides say, will benefit greatly once the law takes full effect.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Allyn Gaestel, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The women congregated Wednesday on a busy street corner across from City Hall. They waved signs and handed out fliers. But for once, these advocates were not protesting a policy. They were celebrating one. "Women's health has been under attack," said Rebecca Foley, director of public policy at Women's Way, a local women's advocacy organization. "To be able to rejoice is wonderful in this political climate. " Starting Aug. 1, most private insurance plans must phase in coverage of eight preventive-health services for women - free.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama's health-care overhaul will reduce rather than increase the nation's huge federal deficits over the next decade, Congress' nonpartisan budget scorekeepers said Tuesday, supporting Obama's contention in a major election-year dispute with Republicans. Republicans have insisted that "Obamacare" will actually raise deficits - by trillions, according to presidential candidate Mitt Romney. But that's not so, the Congressional Budget Office said. The CBO gave no updated estimate for deficit reductions from the law, approved by Congress and signed by Obama in 2010.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Ken Thomas and Steve Peoples, Associated Press
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Wooing Florida voters, President Obama warned Thursday that Republican challenger Mitt Romney would gut his health-care reform law and turn Medicare into a voucher program, driving up costs for the elderly on fixed incomes. Romney, firing away near his Boston home base, accused Obama of caring only about saving his own job - not the jobs of Americans. In the daily war of words in an up-for-grabs presidential contest, health-care politics took top billing as Obama opened two days of campaigning in Florida, the largest and most coveted of the nation's Election Day toss-up states.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | VOTERAMA IN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON - Here is how Philadelphia-area members of Congress voted on major issues last week: House Health-law repeal. Voting 244-185, the House on Wednesday sent the Senate a Republican bill (HR 6079) to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which President Obama signed into law in 2010. A yes vote was to repeal the health law. Voting yes: Charles W. Dent (R., Pa.), Michael Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.), Jim Gerlach (R., Pa.), Frank A. LoBiondo (R., N.J.)
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Connie Cass, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - They're young, healthy, and flat broke - and now the government says they have to buy thousands of dollars' worth of medical insurance. What should tapped-out twentysomethings do? Well, some might just do nothing. The annual fine for shrugging off the new federal insurance requirement, which is to begin in 2014, starts out at a relatively low $95, depending on income. That would be far cheaper than paying premiums. But that does not necessarily make blowing off the mandate a good idea for the fit and frugal.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Now that the Supreme Court has upheld health-care reform, President Obama can get to the next logical order of business: compulsory broccoli purchases.   Absurd? Tell that to the Supreme Court, which cited the vegetable no fewer than a dozen times in its ruling last week on the Affordable Care Act. Not so long ago, when no legal scholar believed the health-care law faced a serious constitutional challenge, the broccoli question sprouted as conservative reductio ad absurdum: If the federal government could force us to buy health insurance, why couldn't it make us buy broccoli?
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