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NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced Wednesday that he was undertaking an audit of the state health department's handling of nearly $800 million in research funding provided by the national tobacco settlement. "These funds are intended to fuel health-care research that could help people live longer, healthier, and more rewarding lives," DePasquale said. "We have to make sure these research programs are meeting expectations so that nothing jeopardizes their vital mission or erodes public confidence.
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | By Daniel S. Greenberg
Is it churlish to raise questions about Christopher Reeve's success in obtaining an additional $10 million in government money for researchers working on spinal-cord injury? Clearly yes, given that Reeve, of Superman film renown, remains paralyzed from a riding accident last year. Determined to regain his health, Reeve has been campaigning for an expansion of research to benefit the thousands who share his affliction. In a wheelchair, and dependent on a respirator, he is a heroic figure.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - Drunken driving incidents have fallen 30 percent in the last five years, and last year were at their lowest mark in nearly two decades, according to a federal report. The decline may be due to the down economy: Other research suggests people are still drinking as heavily as in years past, so some may just be finding cheaper ways of imbibing than by going to bars, night clubs and restaurants. "One possibility is that people are drinking at home more and driving less after drinking," said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
March 16, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last year, the increase in the cost of health-insurance premiums was more than twice the increase in workers' earnings. And that made 2006 a really great year. Health-insurance premiums went up 7.7 percent. Workers earnings went up 3.8 percent - even more than the 3.5 percent rate of overall inflation, according to an annual report by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research and Educational Trust. But it's all a matter of perspective. In 2003, for example, health-insurance premiums rose 13.9 percent, while wages grew 3 percent.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG The state has frozen $100 million slated for health research, prescription drugs, and smoking-cessation programs because an arbitration panel slashed its share of the 1998 tobacco settlement that had been paying for the programs. In a ruling last month, the panel overseeing the multistate settlement found that Pennsylvania had failed to adequately enforce certain terms of the agreement with tobacco manufacturers. The arbitrators said the companies could cut their annual payments to the commonwealth by $180 million - or about 60 percent of the nearly $320 million the state had been getting every year.
NEWS
December 19, 2000
Pennsylvania still hasn't figured out what to do with $464 million in new money from the national tobbaco settlement - making it one of the few states involved that is still dithering. House Republicans keep talking about how horribly complicated it is to decide what to do with the money. Fact is there is nothing complicated at all. Months ago, Republican Gov. Ridge proposed that Pennsylvania do as many of the 46 states getting the money have done - spend it all on health care, with the biggest chunk going to pay for health care for the uninsured.
NEWS
January 27, 2003 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Saying that medical science has focused too much on diseases of the rich, Microsoft founder Bill Gates announced yesterday that his foundation would offer $200 million for work on malaria, tuberculosis and other diseases of the poor. Only about 10 percent of medical research money is spent on diseases and conditions that make up 90 percent of the world's health problems, according to the Global Forum on Health Research. It is a Swiss foundation supported by the World Health Organization, the World Bank, and Gates, among others.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
Using celebrity spokesmen and "scientific evidence," cigarette advertising has tried to persuade the public that smoking is safe, according to a university researcher who based his opinion on a survey of magazine ads released at a federal trial here yesterday. The survey - labeled in testimony as the most comprehensive of its kind to date - showed that more than one-third of the cigarette ads in Life and Look magazines between 1938 and 1960 contained some health claim. Also, the study showed, more than half the ads through 1983 made some health claim or carried a subliminal message that smoking was pure by setting the ad in a pristine scene.
NEWS
July 20, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Banning lighters on airplanes just not worth it, feds decide WASHINGTON - Federal aviation authorities have decided to stop enforcing a two-year-old rule against taking cigarette lighters on airplanes, concluding that it was a waste of time to search for them before passengers boarded. The ban was imposed at the insistence of Congress after a passenger, Richard Reed, tried to ignite a bomb in his shoe in 2001 on a flight from Paris to Miami. Kip Hawley, assistant secretary for the Transportation Security Administration, said in an interview yesterday with the New York Times that the ban had done little to improve aviation security because small batteries could be used to set off a bomb.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With new management in place and a new business strategy, a California specialty-pharmaceutical company is moving to new headquarters - in Huntingdon Valley. Cellegy Pharmaceuticals Inc. will relocate to the Montgomery County offices of Biosyn Inc., which it bought in October in a deal valued at $30 million. The acquisition gave Cellegy a contraceptive gel intended to prevent the transmission of HIV. Under the deal, Biosyn's 15 employees and cofounder Anne-Marie Corner remained in Huntingdon Valley to continue development of a vaginal lubricant that is designed to prevent pregnancy and many sexually transmitted diseases, including AIDS.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SEEMA S. SONNAD was passionate about her researches in the health services field, but she had another passion, running. She was one of those runners who think mere marathons (26.2 miles) are not challenging enough. They go for the big distances. It was while running an ultramarathon in Washington State on May 27 that Seema suffered a cardiac arrhythmia. She died in Valley Medical Center in Renton, Wash. She was 52 and had homes in West Philadelphia and Chadds Ford. Seema S. Sonnad was director of Health Services Research for the Value Institute at Christiana Care Health System in Wilmington, Del., a position to which she was appointed in October 2012.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced Wednesday that he was undertaking an audit of the state health department's handling of nearly $800 million in research funding provided by the national tobacco settlement. "These funds are intended to fuel health-care research that could help people live longer, healthier, and more rewarding lives," DePasquale said. "We have to make sure these research programs are meeting expectations so that nothing jeopardizes their vital mission or erodes public confidence.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Last fall, the director of the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center briefed the legislative cancer caucus on the center's groundbreaking research on a variety of potentially deadly forms of the disease. In one case detailed by Chi Dang, doctors with Penn and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia used a novel cell-engineering treatment on a young leukemia patient as part of a clinical trial involving acute forms of leukemia. That was two years ago. The little girl remains cancer-free.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG The state has frozen $100 million slated for health research, prescription drugs, and smoking-cessation programs because an arbitration panel slashed its share of the 1998 tobacco settlement that had been paying for the programs. In a ruling last month, the panel overseeing the multistate settlement found that Pennsylvania had failed to adequately enforce certain terms of the agreement with tobacco manufacturers. The arbitrators said the companies could cut their annual payments to the commonwealth by $180 million - or about 60 percent of the nearly $320 million the state had been getting every year.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey says he doesn't have an answer to the national need for balance in creating health-care financing solutions, but he knows that National Institutes of Health funding helps put and keep jobs in the Philadelphia region. "I focus on NIH funding for a couple reasons," Casey said in a meeting with Inquirer editors and reporters. "No. 1 is because this region of the country has made great progress, but also there is no region more at risk than Southeastern Pennsylvania because of the dollars the state gets.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Jonathan Kratchman, a 16-year-old with autism from Cherry Hill, likes participating in medical research studies. "They explain everything to him," says his mother, Amy Kratchman. "For once he feels that someone is listening to him. He's always asking, 'Mom, when's the next study?' " Over the next few years, both mother and son will be spending even more time on the front lines of autism research. Amy Kratchman is part of a research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia that recently received a $668,000 federal grant to help doctors understand the treatment outcomes that children and parents really want.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA - Drunken driving incidents have fallen 30 percent in the last five years, and last year were at their lowest mark in nearly two decades, according to a federal report. The decline may be due to the down economy: Other research suggests people are still drinking as heavily as in years past, so some may just be finding cheaper ways of imbibing than by going to bars, night clubs and restaurants. "One possibility is that people are drinking at home more and driving less after drinking," said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2009 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a young scientist, Antonio Giordano wanted to pursue his own research interests, so he did the less-than-obvious: He chased down pizza magnate Mario Sbarro and begged him for money. After a year of long walks and talks, Sbarro, who founded the pizza chain of the same name, gave Giordano $1 million in 1993 to start what is now the Sbarro Health Research Organization at Temple University. Since then, Giordano has raised $30 million from federal grants and private donations and won 12 patents.
NEWS
September 4, 2007 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wes Rose had already lost some use of his hands and legs, and his neurologist told him the rest of his body would eventually follow. For people with Lou Gehrig's disease, it always does. So Rose decided to fight, joining a drug trial that required him to take two medicines morning and night: little white capsules and a powder mixed with water. But like a dozen trials before that one, it didn't work. Here's a possible reason why: Scientists may have been targeting the wrong disease.
NEWS
July 20, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Banning lighters on airplanes just not worth it, feds decide WASHINGTON - Federal aviation authorities have decided to stop enforcing a two-year-old rule against taking cigarette lighters on airplanes, concluding that it was a waste of time to search for them before passengers boarded. The ban was imposed at the insistence of Congress after a passenger, Richard Reed, tried to ignite a bomb in his shoe in 2001 on a flight from Paris to Miami. Kip Hawley, assistant secretary for the Transportation Security Administration, said in an interview yesterday with the New York Times that the ban had done little to improve aviation security because small batteries could be used to set off a bomb.
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