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NEWS
July 15, 2000 | By Andrew Wigglesworth and Edward Abrahams
Philadelphia is not only the cradle of liberty but also the cradle of American medicine, having given birth to so many of our nation's medical firsts: the first hospital, the first medical school, the first cancer hospital and the first children's hospital. But it is not enough to live in the past. With one of the largest concentrations of health-care knowledge in the nation, this region has the assets to become a global life-sciences center second to none. This is one of Philadelphia's real opportunities to create new jobs and economic growth.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former old boys club on 22d Street, replete with majestic columns, marble rotunda, grand staircase, and a beaux arts exterior protected by a wrought-iron gate, is imposing but not impenetrable. At 16, Faith Konate of South Philadelphia already has a foot in the ancient oak door. An 11th grader at Masterman High, Konate is among 24 young people from "under-resourced" neighborhoods who were handpicked for a novel project at the revered College of Physicians, on South 22d Street.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeking to calm frayed nerves at the Allegheny University of the Health Sciences, the school's interim president told an overflowing auditorium of students yesterday that she is "reasonably certain" the university will survive, though under different leadership. "At the end of the day, I am reasonably certain you will have a university like the one you have today, only it won't be associated with AHERF," said Dorothy McKenna Brown, who replaced Donald Kaye as head of the university last month.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new diabetes research project aims to develop medicines by marrying chemistry expertise from Rowan University with animal physiology knowledge at Rutgers-Camden. Researchers at Rowan have begun work on some promising medicines, while Rutgers-Camden professors hope to examine plant-based folk medicines from Africa. Rowan scholars have the background to explore the mechanisms behind the medicines, while Rutgers-Camden will focus on testing them on diabetic mice. "We need each other, because the people at Rowan are unable to test the results of their medicines on the physiology," said Joseph V. Martin, a biology professor and associate dean at Rutgers-Camden, who is one of the primary researchers on the project.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Jennifer Jackson, 16, and Joe Mundey, 15, are among four students from the Franklin Learning Center, the city's health sciences magnet school, who are leaving for Salt Lake City today to compete in a national College Bowl-type competition on health sciences, sponsored by Health Occupation Students of America. Other members of the team, which beat out 14 other Pennsylvania high schools in April, are Magalie Emile, 16, and Kristina Leidy, 14.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | STEVEN M. FALK/ DAILY NEWS
DOROTHY BROWN, interim president of Allegheny University of the Health Sciences, speaks at memorial service yesterday for Dr. Jonathan Mann, School of Public Health dean and pioneer AIDS fighter, who died in the Swissair crash Sept. 2.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
A senior administrator from the University of Pennsylvania's medical school will join Rutgers University to lead its newly organized medical organization, which oversees a collection of schools and units that include ones from the defunct University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Brian L. Strom, the executive vice dean for institutional affairs at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and a professor at that school, will leave to take up the position Dec. 2 as inaugural chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences.
NEWS
December 1, 2006 | By David S. Traub
The terrible prospect of Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic leaving the city has reignited an idea that has been smoldering in my mind for some time. To combat Philadelphia's continuing job-loss problem, we need to identify sectors of the economy that are still viable and build upon them. One way of building is to first "dramatize. " Our medical and health-sciences industry is one of the largest on the planet. We have six medical schools, two dental schools, innumerable great hospitals and nursing schools, a host of pharmaceutical and bioresearch companies, health-care insurers, and thousands of medical doctors in private practice.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After months of tense political negotiations and public outcry, a proposed merger of Rutgers University's Camden campus and Rowan University was scuttled. In its place was a compromise: A joint board would be created so the two schools would work together in Camden on health sciences programs. But the plan has been slow to move forward - the law that created the board took effect July 1, but two of the seven board members have not yet been appointed. Meanwhile, politicians have worked for months behind the scenes to give the board more power.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new diabetes research project aims to develop medicines by marrying chemistry expertise from Rowan University with animal physiology knowledge at Rutgers-Camden. Researchers at Rowan have begun work on some promising medicines, while Rutgers-Camden professors hope to examine plant-based folk medicines from Africa. Rowan scholars have the background to explore the mechanisms behind the medicines, while Rutgers-Camden will focus on testing them on diabetic mice. "We need each other, because the people at Rowan are unable to test the results of their medicines on the physiology," said Joseph V. Martin, a biology professor and associate dean at Rutgers-Camden, who is one of the primary researchers on the project.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center in Camden, a small strip of storefronts and restaurants attracts a steady stream of people in and out to get fried chicken, look at new cellphones, buy clothing. The scene is set to be replaced with a different sort of bustle as state authorities last week granted preliminary approval to $50 million for a new health sciences building. Stretching from Broadway west to Fifth Street and from Martin Luther King Boulevard south to Stevens Street, the Joint Health Sciences Center and related buildings are meant to bring together Rowan University, Rutgers-Camden, and other medical and educational institutions in the city for teaching and research.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY is publishing a new draft comprehensive campus plan today, "Visualize Temple," as an "action plan" for campus development over the next 15 to 20 years. "Temple is positioned to become one of America's premier urban universities," the plan states. It cites doubling the university's research capacity and investing in new facilities as major goals. "This crucial strategic framework for planning and development touches on practically every aspect of university life, spans all domestic campuses and is nothing short of transformational," Temple President Neil D. Theobald said in a statement yesterday.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2014
AWeber Email Marketing hired Sarah Thomas as director of customer solutions and Lynette Young as content marketing manager. Thomas was global support operations manager at Netflix in Santa Clara, Calif. and Young was founder and owner of Purple Stripe Productions. Jane Runey Knox was promoted to chief operating officer at Healthcare Administrative Partners , a Media-based medical data and technology company. Lydia Turner was hired as general manager of Ocean Prime Philadelphia , an American supper club.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After months of tense political negotiations and public outcry, a proposed merger of Rutgers University's Camden campus and Rowan University was scuttled. In its place was a compromise: A joint board would be created so the two schools would work together in Camden on health sciences programs. But the plan has been slow to move forward - the law that created the board took effect July 1, but two of the seven board members have not yet been appointed. Meanwhile, politicians have worked for months behind the scenes to give the board more power.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christine Marie Ambrose, 49, of Narberth, a program manager at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who helped adolescents learn to live with HIV, died Monday, Jan. 6, of metastatic lung cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Starting in 1997, as an adolescent social worker at Children's, Ms. Ambrose managed the cases of 55 HIV-infected youngsters and their families. She did individual and family therapy and home visits, and tried to help patients establish a life direction while dealing with the virus.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A board created to oversee a new health sciences partnership between Rowan University and Rutgers-Camden would gain eminent domain powers under a bill that cleared the Senate budget committee Monday. The bill, sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester), also would allow Rowan to enter into public-private partnerships, including for new construction. It would exempt the school - elevated to a state research institution as a result of the higher-education restructuring that took effect last year - from certain public bidding requirements, in line with existing law granting exemptions for state colleges.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON Gov. Christie's three nominees to a new Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden board of governors cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. The full Senate must approve the nominees, who include Louis Bezich of Haddon Township, chief of staff to the president at Cooper University Hospital. The board - which is still incomplete - is a product of the Higher Education Restructuring Act, which was passed by the Legislature last year and took effect in July. It will oversee a new College of Health Sciences that includes programs at Rowan and Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
A senior administrator from the University of Pennsylvania's medical school will join Rutgers University to lead its newly organized medical organization, which oversees a collection of schools and units that include ones from the defunct University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Brian L. Strom, the executive vice dean for institutional affairs at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and a professor at that school, will leave to take up the position Dec. 2 as inaugural chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Stephen Sweeney
Stronger higher education and medical schools lead to a stronger economy, and the New Jersey Medical and Health Sciences Education Restructuring Act, which went into effect this month, will contribute to both. Last year, the Legislature approved, and Gov. Christie signed, the legislation, which is changing education in our state. As of July 1, most components of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey were transferred to Rutgers University. University Hospital in Newark became an autonomous institution, and the School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford became a part of Rowan University.
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