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NEWS
July 15, 2000 | By Andrew Wigglesworth and Edward Abrahams
Philadelphia is not only the cradle of liberty but also the cradle of American medicine, having given birth to so many of our nation's medical firsts: the first hospital, the first medical school, the first cancer hospital and the first children's hospital. But it is not enough to live in the past. With one of the largest concentrations of health-care knowledge in the nation, this region has the assets to become a global life-sciences center second to none. This is one of Philadelphia's real opportunities to create new jobs and economic growth.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former old boys club on 22d Street, replete with majestic columns, marble rotunda, grand staircase, and a beaux arts exterior protected by a wrought-iron gate, is imposing but not impenetrable. At 16, Faith Konate of South Philadelphia already has a foot in the ancient oak door. An 11th grader at Masterman High, Konate is among 24 young people from "under-resourced" neighborhoods who were handpicked for a novel project at the revered College of Physicians, on South 22d Street.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeking to calm frayed nerves at the Allegheny University of the Health Sciences, the school's interim president told an overflowing auditorium of students yesterday that she is "reasonably certain" the university will survive, though under different leadership. "At the end of the day, I am reasonably certain you will have a university like the one you have today, only it won't be associated with AHERF," said Dorothy McKenna Brown, who replaced Donald Kaye as head of the university last month.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Jennifer Jackson, 16, and Joe Mundey, 15, are among four students from the Franklin Learning Center, the city's health sciences magnet school, who are leaving for Salt Lake City today to compete in a national College Bowl-type competition on health sciences, sponsored by Health Occupation Students of America. Other members of the team, which beat out 14 other Pennsylvania high schools in April, are Magalie Emile, 16, and Kristina Leidy, 14.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | STEVEN M. FALK/ DAILY NEWS
DOROTHY BROWN, interim president of Allegheny University of the Health Sciences, speaks at memorial service yesterday for Dr. Jonathan Mann, School of Public Health dean and pioneer AIDS fighter, who died in the Swissair crash Sept. 2.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Counselors at an after-school homework program in Coatesville say that in two instances, they heard young people discussing suicide and were able to intervene to prevent tragedies. They used techniques they had learned recently in a program called Mental Health First Aid. More than 500,000 people nationwide have completed the training, and over 900 of those are teachers, custodians, cafeteria workers, police officers, high school students, and community members in Chester County.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
A senior administrator from the University of Pennsylvania's medical school will join Rutgers University to lead its newly organized medical organization, which oversees a collection of schools and units that include ones from the defunct University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Brian L. Strom, the executive vice dean for institutional affairs at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and a professor at that school, will leave to take up the position Dec. 2 as inaugural chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences.
NEWS
December 1, 2006 | By David S. Traub
The terrible prospect of Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic leaving the city has reignited an idea that has been smoldering in my mind for some time. To combat Philadelphia's continuing job-loss problem, we need to identify sectors of the economy that are still viable and build upon them. One way of building is to first "dramatize. " Our medical and health-sciences industry is one of the largest on the planet. We have six medical schools, two dental schools, innumerable great hospitals and nursing schools, a host of pharmaceutical and bioresearch companies, health-care insurers, and thousands of medical doctors in private practice.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A board created to oversee a new health sciences partnership between Rowan University and Rutgers-Camden would gain eminent domain powers under a bill that cleared the Senate budget committee Monday. The bill, sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester), also would allow Rowan to enter into public-private partnerships, including for new construction. It would exempt the school - elevated to a state research institution as a result of the higher-education restructuring that took effect last year - from certain public bidding requirements, in line with existing law granting exemptions for state colleges.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Dr. Darryl H. Aarons earned his professional reputation as a family physician in Voorhees before retiring in 2001 and moving to Wellington, Fla., in 2002. But among friends there, he was better known as a fully grown expert in the youngsters' game of stickball. "He's in the hall of fame of our stickball league, in Wellington," said a friend of more than 30 years, Allen Lebowitz. Dr. Aarons was a shortstop, Lebowitz said, on the team appropriately named the Wycliffe Stiffs.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Brenda D. Gavin, 67, of Philadelphia, a nationally known venture capitalist and a business leader in Philadelphia, died Thursday, March 17, of a stroke at Pennsylvania Hospital. In life, Dr. Gavin nurtured many new life-science companies and mentored numerous colleagues; in death, she became a gift-of-life donor for four patients in need of transplant organs. One of the earliest women to become schooled and active in health-sciences venture capital investing, Dr. Gavin knew how to connect the right scientists and physicians to start successful new companies, her family said.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Counselors at an after-school homework program in Coatesville say that in two instances, they heard young people discussing suicide and were able to intervene to prevent tragedies. They used techniques they had learned recently in a program called Mental Health First Aid. More than 500,000 people nationwide have completed the training, and over 900 of those are teachers, custodians, cafeteria workers, police officers, high school students, and community members in Chester County.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
New Jersey lawmakers gave final approval Friday to $50 million in bonds to help fund a "health sciences" center in downtown Camden. The building is being developed by a joint Rowan University and Rutgers-Camden board of governors, formed in 2013 and tasked with creating health sciences partnerships between the schools. The center is to go up in the block diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center. The block stretches from Martin Luther King Boulevard to Stevens Street and from Broadway to Fifth Street.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Arcadia University and Salus University said Friday that they have entered into a strategic alliance to share educational, clinical, and administrative resources. Students at Arcadia would be able to study advanced health technologies offered by Salus, while Salus students, faculty, and alumni could take part in Arcadia's programs abroad, the two Montgomery County schools said in a news release. The universities already share an optometry program. Students complete three years of pre-optometry science studies at Arcadia, in Glenside, followed by four years at Salus, based in Elkins Park.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leveling a city block in downtown Camden to build a "health sciences" campus, the Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden Board of Governors has begun flexing its muscle, making clear the scope of its mission and powers. Less than two years since its creation, the board also has funded diabetes research and steered federal grant money to training and jobs program. The most tangible evidence is the demolition work on the block diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center - a block that the joint board has nearly finished acquiring, in part using eminent domain.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University raised a record $187.9 million last school year, most of it earmarked for specific programs and projects, the school announced Wednesday. The bulk of the money - about 60 percent - came from "a surge in donations" received at the end of the university's 71/2-year "Our Rutgers, Our Future" fund-raising campaign, the university said in a news release. The campaign to raise $1 billion ended Dec. 31, 2014, exceeding its goal by $37 million. The 2014-15 record surpassed the previous year's total by 26.6 percent.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new diabetes research project aims to develop medicines by marrying chemistry expertise from Rowan University with animal physiology knowledge at Rutgers-Camden. Researchers at Rowan have begun work on some promising medicines, while Rutgers-Camden professors hope to examine plant-based folk medicines from Africa. Rowan scholars have the background to explore the mechanisms behind the medicines, while Rutgers-Camden will focus on testing them on diabetic mice. "We need each other, because the people at Rowan are unable to test the results of their medicines on the physiology," said Joseph V. Martin, a biology professor and associate dean at Rutgers-Camden, who is one of the primary researchers on the project.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center in Camden, a small strip of storefronts and restaurants attracts a steady stream of people in and out to get fried chicken, look at new cellphones, buy clothing. The scene is set to be replaced with a different sort of bustle as state authorities last week granted preliminary approval to $50 million for a new health sciences building. Stretching from Broadway west to Fifth Street and from Martin Luther King Boulevard south to Stevens Street, the Joint Health Sciences Center and related buildings are meant to bring together Rowan University, Rutgers-Camden, and other medical and educational institutions in the city for teaching and research.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY is publishing a new draft comprehensive campus plan today, "Visualize Temple," as an "action plan" for campus development over the next 15 to 20 years. "Temple is positioned to become one of America's premier urban universities," the plan states. It cites doubling the university's research capacity and investing in new facilities as major goals. "This crucial strategic framework for planning and development touches on practically every aspect of university life, spans all domestic campuses and is nothing short of transformational," Temple President Neil D. Theobald said in a statement yesterday.
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