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NEWS
January 1, 1994 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
When there was widespread press coverage recently of a study indicating that moderate drinking reduces the risk of heart attacks, I figured that a news item about health that wouldn't cause any controversy at our local saloon, Matty's Tap, had finally come along. A news item on any subject is likely to cause some controversy at Matty's Tap. At least once an evening, discussions tend to heat up to the point at which Matty is forced to slam his hand on the bar and remind the assembled of the house rules of combat: "Don't shout, or you're out. " Normally, studies about how everyday habits might affect your health are particularly controversial at Matty's.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
They could tell how well you hear and see. They could test your blood for signs of diabetes. They could even tell you what percentage of your body is made up of fat. Experts from 37 health agencies taught more than 150 Medford residents the ABCs of staying away from MD's, RN's and Rx's at Memorial School's first health fair Thursday. Barbara Caruso, the school nurse, organized the fair. There were police officers dressed as crash dummies, advocating the use of seat belts. The Head Injury Support Group of Southern New Jersey raffled a bicycle helmet, near where a woman from the New Jersey Commission of the Blind typed children's names in Braille.
SPORTS
February 7, 2012
Germantown Academy issued a news release saying that boys' basketball coach Jim Fenerty, who spent three days in the hospital last week, has been told by doctors that he "is not allowed to coach any more games this season. " Tests revealed that Fenerty, 61, has Polycythemia vera, a bone marrow disease that leads to an abnormal increase in the number of red blood cells. The release said his condition "has not worsened, but the doctors feel that the physical energy required for coaching would be problematic to regaining full health.
NEWS
July 25, 2007
WHILE I ADMIRE Fatimah Ali's praise of the mayor's health initiative, I'd be a little apprehensive of publicly offering a "job well done" to him. The mayor seems to care about the health of Philadelphians, but another part of me knows that one of the secrets to good health is to actually being alive. While it's good to be skinny, I hardly think that's any consolation for someone lying in a casket dead from a stray bullet. All of sudden the mayor is concerned about his legacy?
SPORTS
November 10, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Yankees officials insisted George Steinbrenner was in good health, a day after Gary Sheffield said his future with New York would be secure if the owner's condition was better. Steinbrenner fainted last month while attending his granddaughter's play, the second time in 3 years he collapsed in public, and he returned to his Florida office several days later. Sheffield said "middle men" had blocked him from speaking with Steinbrenner and that "if it wasn't for his health, I'd have made that conversation happen.
NEWS
June 22, 1998
Healthy means not being weighed down by a lot of worries. Worries about, "Is my mom going to be OK?" "Is my little sister OK?" "Will we have enough for the rent and food and things?" It means feeling safe and like things will be OK, not depressed and angry all the time. It means being healthy in the usual sense, too, like not being sick. But it means more about being in control of things, being able to do the things I want. Being able to be young instead of always feeling old. Chrystal, age 14 Self-described "African American, heterosexual young woman"; quoted in Lynn Phillips' "The Girls Report: Commissioned by the National Council for Research on Women.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Billups children stopped their mid-morning sweeping yesterday when the two very official-looking girls came to their porch, some very official- looking papers in their hands. Drisana, 5, leaned first her broom and then herself against the porch railing. Teresa, 6, crouched near the doorway. Majovi, 8, straddled the railing up against the house. From the looks of it, this was to be some very important business conducted on their porch in the 5800 block of Angora Terrace in Southwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 1, 1996 | By Calvin Trillin
When there was widespread press coverage of a study indicating that moderate drinking reduces the risk of heart attacks, I figured that a news item about health that wouldn't cause any controversy at our local saloon, Matty's Tap, had finally come along. A news item on any subject is likely to cause some controversy at Matty's Tap. At least once an evening, discussions tend to heat up to the point at which Matty is forced to slam his hand on the bar and remind the assembled of the house rules of combat: "Don't shout, or you're out. " Normally, studies about how everyday habits might affect your health are particularly controversial at Matty's.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
In the wake of Monday's tornadoes in Oklahoma, volunteers are being deployed from around the country to assist in the recovery, including a woman from Philadelphia. Danelle Stoppel, a volunteer mental health supervisor with the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania, will leave at 6:30 a.m. Tuesday to fly to the tornado-ravaged area. It will be Stoppel's 13th disaster deployment in just two years volunteering with the organization, helping her earn the nickname "Deployment Danelle.
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