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NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
Health means wealth for American business, according to two Glassboro State College professors, who have written a book on the importance of corporate fitness programs for employees. But mental fitness may be more significant than physical fitness, say authors Robert Pritchard and Gregory Potter, who argue that showing workers a little compassion may be more crucial than offering them aerobics classes. Their book, Fitness Inc., advises corporate managers that the morale and emotional well-being of their workers can have a profound impact on the company's balance sheet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012
1EAT WELL. Make family meals a priority; be a good role model and stock your kitchen with healthy options. Cook meals together. It's a great way to bond with your child, share family traditions and practice math and reading. 2GET MOVING. Put down that remote and get off the couch. Parents need to exercise, not only for their own well-being but also to show the kids it's important. 3HAVE FAMILY MEALS. While I agree it's tough juggling career, family and social obligations, try to have at least one sit-down meal as a family every week.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | By John C. Brazington, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The borough is seeking a federal grant to pay for a survey of about 3,400 people whose health may have been affected by contamination at the former Lipari Landfill, a site that once led the federal Superfund cleanup list. If the $81,000 grant is approved by the Agency of Toxic Substance and Disease Registry in Atlanta, the money will be used to collect data on those who resided near the landfill from 1967 to 1984, said Clare Bonner, director of the Lipari Information Network. LINK was established by the borough in 1992 to monitor residents' health.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011
MICHELLE GOURDINE is on a mission to educate, engage and empower African-Americans to exceptional health and well-being. In her new book, Reclaiming Our Health: A Guide to African-American Wellness ($19.95, Yale University Press), the 48-year-old primary-care physician and health-policy specialist (she's a former deputy secretary of health and chief public-health physician for the state of Maryland) gives us a long overdue diagnosis, prognosis and straight-talk prescription on how to heal ourselves and our community.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
I direct an urban day-care center and am appalled that these little children aren't immunized and don't seem to have doctors or dentists. Although we try to practice good health and safety care in our center, it would be nice to have someplace or someone to call when we have questions. We're very interested in upgrading the quality of our center, but don't quite know where to turn. Because increasing numbers of small children are cared for outside their homes, health queries at early-childhood centers are becoming more common.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
I haven't made up my mind, whether I have the energy and the capacity to run. I may, I may not. I made no decision yesterday . . . I'm not thinking about politics very much right now, I'm thinking about health. I'm thinking about personal concerns. New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, May 11 - a day after he announced he would seek a separation from his wife, Donna Hanover.
NEWS
September 25, 1986
I am writing to express my dismay over the news that the municipal district health centers in Philadelphia will henceforth charge fees for treatment for medical and dental care to "all except the neediest patients. " A family of four whose income is greater than $11,000 per year may not be defined as "the neediest" by the Reagan government and those who think like it, but in this city, in 1986, that income is marginal at best and the "frills" such as preventive pediatric health care will, of course, be eliminated before housing and food and other absolute essentials by most low-income families.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Ever since Gov. Casey underwent bypass surgery in October 1987, he has had to endure the pain of not only his physical recovery but also countless questions, innuendos and rumors about his health. Casey yesterday was once again put in the position of having to provide answers not about how he feels about things like the budget or taxes, but simply about how he feels. The question about his health - and whether he planned to resign - came during a news conference about the budget.
NEWS
April 25, 1989 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new study on the state of health of the Philadelphia region paints a dreary picture of a city in which babies die at an alarming rate, teens give birth more and more frequently, and children and the elderly alike are threatened by a health-care system that all too often fails to meet their needs. "Health encompasses physical, mental and social well-being, and Philadelphia, despite its prestigious medical schools and abundance of hospitals, is not a healthy city," concludes the study, by the Pew Charitable Trusts.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
A federal lawsuit against Pennsylvania Health Secretary Eli Avila alleges that, in a cafe snit over an egg sandwich, he barked, "You don't know who I am. " For my money, Avila's greater offense is presuming a fry cook - or anyone - would care. That's because Avila, a supremely qualified doctor, lawyer, and celebrity look-alike (see Gru, from the animated movie Despicable Me ), toils in state government. In star-blind Pennsylvania, of all places. Avila may fancy himself a public-health rock star, but he's a bureaucrat.
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