CollectionsHealth
IN THE NEWS

Health

NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
A federal lawsuit against Pennsylvania Health Secretary Eli Avila alleges that, in a cafe snit over an egg sandwich, he barked, "You don't know who I am. " For my money, Avila's greater offense is presuming a fry cook - or anyone - would care. That's because Avila, a supremely qualified doctor, lawyer, and celebrity look-alike (see Gru, from the animated movie Despicable Me ), toils in state government. In star-blind Pennsylvania, of all places. Avila may fancy himself a public-health rock star, but he's a bureaucrat.
NEWS
September 18, 1993 | By IRVIN D. RUTMAN
We all want a national health-care system that is comprehensive yet manageable, effective yet affordable. Many details of the plan President Clinton is due to announce in a matter of days already have been released - and they trouble those of us concerned with services to persons with serious psychiatric illnesses, a patient group that has never enjoyed strong public acceptance. Two areas of mental-health care face severe cutbacks: acute-care services, which include both hospital care and out-patient treatment; and psychiatric rehabilitation services that help ex-patients to re-establish productive lives.
NEWS
May 13, 1999
We treat our poor badly in this country and our sick poor even worse. Since I do not believe we are a cruel and indifferent country (most of the time), and surely not an impoverished one, it is a mystery why we don't do better. Not only did the Clinton health reform effort, aimed at providing universal access, fail in 1994, so did every other effort, whether liberal or conservative. Nobody liked anybody's ideas. Worse still, despite the fact that there are now some 43 million uninsured people, up from the 37 million of 1994, there is not now the slightest evidence of any move in Congress to take up health-care reform in a serious way. Perhaps our legislators recognize that, after all, it is not really a mystery why we don't do better in this country: a history of starting reform efforts too late (that should have happened more robustly in the 1960s)
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Kristi Nelson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The long-overdue draft health assessment of the proposed East 10th Street Superfund cleanup site is expected to be finished by October, according to an environmental health scientist for the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Jack Kelly, a regional representative for the agency, said he would give an update to the public at an Environmental Advisory Council meeting scheduled for 7 tonight in the borough hall, 10th and Market Streets. The agency is an independent arm of the Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
February 14, 1993
When May rolls around and it's time for Hillary Clinton to present the health-reform plan that could make or break the Clinton presidency, we hope she's looking as sunny, poised and confident as she was in Harrisburg last week. She was a class act, lighting up a health-care conference called by Sen. Harris Wofford, the man who almost single-handedly catapulted America's health crisis to center stage. Health policy has a way of aging people; bogging them down. "I started with a full head of hair," John Russell of the Pennsylvania Hospital Association told the First Lady.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With Springfield Hospital operating at a loss of $1 million a year, some might think it would be looking to downsize operations. Just the opposite: It plans to double its size by adding outpatient services as well as a health and wellness center. Hospital officials presented their plans at a community meeting last night in a hospital conference room. Executive director Martha Waters said she had invited about 35 community members, although only six showed up. Waters said the new facilities were needed to generate profits, to make up for losses in providing regular hospital services.
NEWS
December 22, 1997
Sex is not the reason readers routinely turn to this page. Throbbing and orgasmic are not the words routinely inserted here to buttress an argument or shape a policy. But medical researchers, too often killjoys in white coats, have finally divined that something we enjoy is not going to kill us, and such a scientific triumph cannot be ignored. Sex is healthy. Joy to the world. Pardon the excess, but the mortality-rate study released last week of 918 men between the ages 45 and 49 in Caerphilly, Wales, is worth our attention both for its simplicity and its flaws.
NEWS
January 27, 1994
The most dramatic aspect of Gov. Casey's speech to the General Assembly yesterday was the fact that he was there at all - seven months after a risky, life-saving operation. The thrust of Mr. Casey's address was that Pennsylvania can better serve its citizens in areas such as crime, welfare and health care, even as the state substantially cuts taxes on business to juice the economy. The proof of this must await the Casey budget next month, but we believe the governor's emphasis on tax relief for business let him avoid addressing inadequacies in current programs and policies.
NEWS
March 25, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anthony Gordon never imagined he would spend yesterday afternoon coursing through a human vein - even if the experience was only virtual. But the 48-year-old Mayfair resident, joining thousands of visitors yesterday to the sixth annual Fit Fest, ended up at Alpha II, an exhibit that offered a tour of the human body inside a moving capsule with 11 other passengers, all wearing 3-D glasses. "It was interesting and fun," said Gordon, adding that he did not mind the wait time of almost 45 minutes for the popular, six-minute ride.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anchors away - KYW's Stephanie Stahl has another assignment. Stahl, 39, who's been coanchoring the 6 p.m. news on Channel 3 since April of '94, and is also a lead reporter on the 11 o'clock news, will become the station's health correspondent by the end of the year. She'll still be a regular presence on both the 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts, says news director Paul Gluck. This is not a demotion, Gluck says, but something that both parties wanted. "It was mutual. She's a great reporter to do this stuff," Gluck said.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|