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NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Joy Tsin Lau, the Chinatown eatery where 100 lawyers and law students were sickened in February, received another scorching helping of criticism last week from the city Health Department. The dim sum restaurant "does not have adequate refrigeration equipment [or the] capacity to maintain all refrigerated foods at a temperature of 41 degrees or below," inspector Thomas Kolb wrote Thursday. Temperatures over 41 degrees promote the rapid growth of potentially toxic bacteria. In his report, Kolb wrote that jellyfish, duck, and bean sprouts were being stored at temperatures of 50 degrees or more at Joy Tsin Lau. The inspector also cited the restaurant for two additional serious risk factors - an employee eating in the kitchen prep area and another who did not follow proper hand-washing protocols - and seven lesser infractions.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, STAFF WRITER
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney released another round of appointments Friday morning, keeping three commissioners in their posts and tapping two new department heads. Those staying on in the new administration are Arthur C. Evans Jr., commissioner of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services; Thomas Conway, deputy managing director of the Community Life Improvement Program; and Bridget Collins-Greenwald, commissioner of Public Property. "Arthur, Tom and Bridget have provided strong leadership and oversight to their respective city departments.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new study of Camden's food landscape identifies plenty of ways in which city leaders, local politicians, and large corporations can use access to food as a way to grow the city's economy. As several large corporations plan to move into Camden, the study recommends that the city find ways to tap into the growing daytime workforce, which could mean opening new restaurants as well as supporting and promoting existing ones. Anchor institutions, such as the city's universities and hospitals, could consider developing nutrition and voucher programs for residents and partnerships with local nonprofits.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
THE WAITES family of West Philadelphia never thought of Loreen Jones as anything but a treasured member of the family, even if she was a foster kid. "Loreen joined the Waites family circle when she was 14 months old," said Jean Waites-Howard, who was 14 years old when Loreen arrived. "She was the beloved baby of the family. " Jean more or less adopted her "baby sister," taking her everywhere, the baby propped on her hip. And Jean's mother, Bessie Waites, was no less attentive.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Taking better care of ourselves is a popular New Year's resolution. We vow to eat healthier and exercise more - reasons for all the advertisements on TV for diet plans and gym memberships. If our bodies could talk - which they really do - we'd also be hearing that now's the time to strategize on ways of getting a better night's sleep, a third link in the chain for improving our physical and mental well being. Maybe one or more of the clever bedroom-focused health tech products we've stumbled upon (while sleep walking or suffering insomnia)
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Officially, Friday was a holiday for state employees. But for Loren Robinson, Pennsylvania's deputy secretary for health promotion and disease prevention, that just meant working a double shift. Robinson, 34, moonlights as an overnight physician at Abington-Lansdale Hospital. And, as has been her tradition for a decade, it was a hospital Christmas: She worked from 7 a.m. to 7 a.m., with a six-hour break for a nap and a plate of cafeteria turkey and mashed potatoes. The way the South Philadelphia resident sees it, it's the best and highest use of her holiday.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
After the last of the baby boomers become fully eligible for Medicare, the federal health program can expect significantly higher costs in 2030, because of the high number of beneficiaries and because many are expected to be significantly less healthy than previous generations. The typical Medicare beneficiary who is 65 or older then will more likely be obese, disabled, and suffering from chronic conditions such as heart disease and high blood pressure than those in 2010, according to a report by the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Holy Redeemer Health System is expanding in Bucks County, with three outpatient facilities expected to open next year in Warminster, Feasterville, and Richboro. The health system, anchored by a hospital in Meadowbrook, Montgomery County, now has two outpatient centers, in Bensalem and Southampton, and got 30 percent of its $348 million in patient revenue from outpatients in fiscal 2015. The cost of the three new sites is expected to be $20 million, with Holy Redeemer paying $7 million and the developer, MRA Group, responsible for the rest, Holy Redeemer said.
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