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NEWS
September 4, 2014
AN AGREEMENT reached last week between the federal government and Gov. Corbett on an expanded Medicaid program means that Pennsylvania will join the ranks of states whose poorer citizens aren't doomed to a short and/or sick life because they can't afford health care. When the federal government offered Medicaid expansion to states as part of the Affordable Care Act, the majority of Republican governors rejected that offer, claiming it would be too expensive to expand eligibility, despite the fact that the feds would pick up almost all of the tab: 100 percent in the first year, and 90 percent thereafter.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yuliana Vazquez of Kennett Square was 25 with an 8-month-old baby girl when doctors found a lump in her breast. Her cancer was even scarier because she did not understand her diagnosis at first. Vazquez is from Mexico, has a middle school education, and speaks little English. Add in complex medical terms and the unreliable interpreter she had found, and Vazquez was lost. She missed some of her treatments. She had to delay some appointments. The cancer later spread to her liver and bones.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A coalition of doctors, nurses, and environmental groups is calling on the Corbett administration to address citizen complaints more comprehensively and better track potential health effects related to natural-gas drilling. With the rapid rise of drilling and related industrial activity in the Marcellus Shale region, the state is abrogating its responsibility to protect public health, health professionals said at a news conference at the Capitol on Tuesday. "The role of the Pennsylvania Department of Health is to 'prevent injury and disease,' and to 'lead the development of sound health policy and planning.' Yet when it comes to fracking, the DOH has done little to prevent exposure or lead policy development," said Julie Becker, a professor at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2014
WITH ALL the tempting choices out there, most, if not all of us, struggle with cooking at home. Home-cooked meals from scratch are likely more nutritious and better for overall health. But these days, with our mainly sedentary, round-the-clock lifestyles, it is increasingly difficult for people to carve out the time to plan, shop and prepare nutritious meals at home. Budgeting, planning, shopping and preparing healthy meals can be particularly challenging when resources are slim and money is tight.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Carol Wolff took over as the head of the Camden branch of a federally funded community health organization, a disease was making headlines as "gay-related immune deficiency," or "gay cancer. " As HIV and AIDS became better understood, Wolff led her organization, the Camden Area Health Education Center, to establish a clean-needle exchange, group and individual counseling for those with HIV or AIDS, and HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness campaigns. The community-based mission led the group to create, in 1996, a weekly summertime farmer's market in downtown Camden.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
KEN CHADWICK had family photos plastered on the walls of his office at Temple University Health System, of which he was associate vice president for real estate and leasing. The photos told associates and visitors where Ken's heart lay. The pictures were of his wife, Gretchen, their five boys and their grandchildren, smiling happily for the camera. And why shouldn't they have been happy? They had their doting husband, father and grandfather to spoil them rotten. "Ken loved more than anything to talk about Gretchen, their boys and grandchildren, and the time they spent together," said Alan N. Rosenberg, senior vice president and chief of staff of the health system.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The storefront in Runnemede suggested it was a place for women to get in shape. But behind the purple sign for the Curves health club was an illegal gambling ring known as the Runnemede Social Club, where people for years played poker all night and watched sports on a wide-screen TV, according to a series of recent guilty pleas. Thomas Rand, 43, of Williamstown, pleaded guilty Friday to promoting gambling. In return for the plea before Superior Court Judge John T. Kelley in Camden County, he agreed to probation after serving 270 days in county jail.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
ISSUE | MENTAL HEALTH Saving lives, costs The excellent article by Erin McCarthy on the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act proposed by U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy (R., Pa.) included claims by opponents that need to be addressed ("Mental health bill pits two rights," Aug. 3). The claims that assisted outpatient treatment - which allows courts to order certain historically violent, seriously mentally ill people into six months of community treatment - would lead to more people being institutionalized involuntarity and turn some away from seeking help are disputed by data showing just the opposite.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it Lucy's booth for the digital age: a "mental health kiosk" at a busy intersection in a ShopRite grocery - next to a blood-pressure machine, opposite the express lanes - and manned by an algorithm in a touch screen. The slogan: "Checkup. Checkout. " Unlike the Peanuts character's quick retorts, this screening tool, professionally developed, asks more than a dozen questions on seven themes ("Feeling sad, empty, hopeless," "Concerned about my teen") before giving a response ("It is likely your child is depressed")
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