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NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
August 10, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The storefront in Runnemede suggested it was a place for women to get in shape. But behind the purple sign for the Curves health club was an illegal gambling ring known as the Runnemede Social Club, where people for years played poker all night and watched sports on a wide-screen TV, according to a series of recent guilty pleas. Thomas Rand, 43, of Williamstown, pleaded guilty Friday to promoting gambling. In return for the plea before Superior Court Judge John T. Kelley in Camden County, he agreed to probation after serving 270 days in county jail.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
ISSUE | MENTAL HEALTH Saving lives, costs The excellent article by Erin McCarthy on the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act proposed by U.S. Rep. Tim Murphy (R., Pa.) included claims by opponents that need to be addressed ("Mental health bill pits two rights," Aug. 3). The claims that assisted outpatient treatment - which allows courts to order certain historically violent, seriously mentally ill people into six months of community treatment - would lead to more people being institutionalized involuntarity and turn some away from seeking help are disputed by data showing just the opposite.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it Lucy's booth for the digital age: a "mental health kiosk" at a busy intersection in a ShopRite grocery - next to a blood-pressure machine, opposite the express lanes - and manned by an algorithm in a touch screen. The slogan: "Checkup. Checkout. " Unlike the Peanuts character's quick retorts, this screening tool, professionally developed, asks more than a dozen questions on seven themes ("Feeling sad, empty, hopeless," "Concerned about my teen") before giving a response ("It is likely your child is depressed")
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
He accused them of poisoning his dinner. Eric Stark and his wife did not know what was going on with their 18-year-old son, an athlete who played basketball, football, and baseball in high school. He was suddenly paranoid - "totally out of the blue," Stark recalled. Now 25, 6-foot-3, 230 pounds, he still lifts weights. Little else is the same. He has lost a brother to suicide. He has been hospitalized nine times in the last seven years. His diagnosis: bipolar disorder with psychotic features.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Chris Mondics and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
In an effort to spur economic growth in Camden and surrounding areas, leaders of a new agency established to coordinate health education at Rutgers-Camden and Rowan University say they expect to develop degree programs in a handful of health professions likely to see explosive growth in the next decade. The three-month-old joint board of the two universities is targeting occupations including dental hygienist and physical and occupational therapist as part of a strategy to match South Jersey residents with future jobs.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
S COTT AMES, 27, of Center City, is co-founder with Dr. Grant Mitchell of Curbside Care in University City. The startup will provide on-demand calls by nurse practitioners and doctors to homes, offices and hotels in Center City beginning this month. Ames is a Wharton School MBA candidate; Mitchell is a graduate of Penn's School of Medicine and a Wharton MBA. I spoke with Ames. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I was in Washington, D.C., and my fiancee got an ear infection.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was fog outside the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ in Paulsboro when Jesse Campbell left morning prayer service around 7 a.m. on Nov. 30, 2012, to go home. He said Tuesday he didn't know at the time that the fog was vinyl chloride that leaked during a train derailment or that it could contaminate the borough's air. It was several days before he was stopped by Paulsboro police from going to his shop, where he details cars and does auto repair work, and told he needed to evacuate the area, he said.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
I DIDN'T THINK you could sweat in a swimming pool. "You're at 50 percent, now push it to 80 percent," my water-fitness instructor yells over the blaring music. The tempo is about to increase. Those of us in the class prepare for what's next with groans. "Take it to 100 percent," shouts Trevin Green, water-fitness coordinator at the Theresa Banks Memorial Aquatics Center in Maryland. He's on the pool deck demonstrating how fast he wants us to go on our Hydrorider aqua bikes. Water splashes as we all try to pedal faster, going nowhere but burning hundreds of calories.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bid to cut Medicare spending and help pay for health-care changes, the Obama administration has significantly expanded audits designed to recover improper payments from health-care providers. "We are taking, I would say, a brutal spanking, those that are fully compliant and within regulation," said Tim Fox, founder and chief executive of Fox Rehabilitation, a Cherry Hill company that provides physical therapy and other services to the elderly. "It's dead easy to commit fraud under Medicare, and that's why there's so much fraud and abuse out there," Fox said.
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