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NEWS
August 1, 2014
S COTT AMES, 27, of Center City, is co-founder with Dr. Grant Mitchell of Curbside Care in University City. The startup will provide on-demand calls by nurse practitioners and doctors to homes, offices and hotels in Center City beginning this month. Ames is a Wharton School MBA candidate; Mitchell is a graduate of Penn's School of Medicine and a Wharton MBA. I spoke with Ames. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I was in Washington, D.C., and my fiancee got an ear infection.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
There was fog outside the Church of the Lord Jesus Christ in Paulsboro when Jesse Campbell left morning prayer service around 7 a.m. on Nov. 30, 2012, to go home. He said Tuesday he didn't know at the time that the fog was vinyl chloride that leaked during a train derailment or that it could contaminate the borough's air. It was several days before he was stopped by Paulsboro police from going to his shop, where he details cars and does auto repair work, and told he needed to evacuate the area, he said.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
I DIDN'T THINK you could sweat in a swimming pool. "You're at 50 percent, now push it to 80 percent," my water-fitness instructor yells over the blaring music. The tempo is about to increase. Those of us in the class prepare for what's next with groans. "Take it to 100 percent," shouts Trevin Green, water-fitness coordinator at the Theresa Banks Memorial Aquatics Center in Maryland. He's on the pool deck demonstrating how fast he wants us to go on our Hydrorider aqua bikes. Water splashes as we all try to pedal faster, going nowhere but burning hundreds of calories.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bid to cut Medicare spending and help pay for health-care changes, the Obama administration has significantly expanded audits designed to recover improper payments from health-care providers. "We are taking, I would say, a brutal spanking, those that are fully compliant and within regulation," said Tim Fox, founder and chief executive of Fox Rehabilitation, a Cherry Hill company that provides physical therapy and other services to the elderly. "It's dead easy to commit fraud under Medicare, and that's why there's so much fraud and abuse out there," Fox said.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorraine E. Piccone, 79, a nurse and resident of Upper Darby and later, Broomall, died Friday, July 18, of septic shock at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. Work and family were top priorities for Mrs. Piccone, whose maiden name was Shelzi. A talented and dedicated nurse, she graduated from Notre Dame Academy in Moylan and pursued her nursing studies and training at Pennsylvania Hospital Nursing School. She spent many years administering long-term care at Little Flower Manor and St. Francis Country House, Catholic nursing facilities in Darby Borough.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
IN THE SHADOW of the old Tastykake factory in Nicetown, there's a greenhouse with an organic vegetable garden and a 170,000 square-foot warehouse owned and operated by the SHARE Food Program. About noon yesterday, Jimmy Rollins and his wife, Johari, prepared a batch of fried green beans for a hungry group of fans and SHARE volunteers outside the greenhouse. "You can't have fries all the time," the Phillies shortstop said. He insisted you try his "green fries" instead. The recipe was simple enough - green beans, olive oil and a dash of salt - but the idea that Philadelphians don't have access to fresh, healthy foods is more complex, and an issue that the Rollins family is invested in. Rollins was outside the SHARE factory to pledge $10,000 from the Rollins Family Foundation and to put a familiar face behind SHARE's initiative to serve healthy and affordable foods to Philadelphians across the city.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
To a teen, everything - from a breakup to a bad grade - can be the end of the world. That's why, said Rep. Tim Murphy (R., Allegheny), the age at which mentally ill children can choose whether they should have treatment should be raised. In Pennsylvania, that so-called age of maturity is 14 - "absurd," Murphy said. That is just one of many parts of a "broken" system that Murphy, a clinical psychologist, wants to fix with his federal mental-health-treatment bill. Reps. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Bucks)
BUSINESS
July 1, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol J. Quinn, now chief executive officer of Mercy Home Health and Mercy LIFE, runs a $130 million operation that employs 780 people focused on the home care of the frail and elderly. Much of what Quinn does as an executive, however, is governed by something that she noticed as a fledgling nurse working in community health: Patients often don't understand, or can't absorb, the discharge instructions they are given when they leave the hospital. "They are under too much stress," she said.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Claudia Gordon spent 14 years chasing down bad boys as a Philadelphia policewoman. As a woman officer, Gordon occasionally ran into a perp who was thinking, "Whatcha gonna do?" Bad move, bad boy. "They think women are weak," said Gordon, 59, who retired in 2006. "But we're not as weak as they think. " On the street, there was no intimidating Gordon. But buying health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace - well, that rattled her. Like so many others who tried to buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last fall, Gordon had to make a couple of attempts to finally get her plan, and only then with the help of a navigator.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is getting a makeover. It wants new health ideas to go viral. It wants partners in business and government, to magnify its impact. And it seeks game-changing ideas from inventors to improve doctor visits and reshape medicine into a "culture of health. " The nation's largest health philanthropy has long been focused on discrete health problems such as smoking and obesity. But in a major policy shift publicly discussed Wednesday for the first time, the Princeton-based foundation is seeking to up its game and inspire mass movements.
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