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NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
M.L. Simone isn't averse to risk. You might remember Simone, the self-proclaimed "most-educated coffee pourer in Philadelphia," who has a business degree and an art administration degree, and who first shared her insurance story here in December. She opened Hinge Cafe, a coffee bar/art gallery in Port Richmond when it was still a Maxwell House Coffee-drinking, blue-collar neighborhood. In Hinge's early years, Simone also risked not having health insurance. Starting a business put health insurance low on her list of priorities, not to mention that she couldn't afford it. But when her daughter was born five years ago, Simone jumped into the pre-Affordable Care Act individual health insurance market, paying a $600 monthly premium.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Marilynn Schmidt Malony was diagnosed May 21 with terminal lung cancer and given perhaps six weeks to live, she told her family about her priority. And it was not her. The shower for a granddaughter, Beth Malony, was set for May 31. Beth's wedding to David Koscielny was to be on June 20. Mrs. Malony's son Steve said she told his daughter, Beth: "No matter what happens, the shower goes on and the wedding goes on. " And so they did, as planned. Mrs. Malony died a week after her diagnosis, on Thursday, May 28, at the Hospice of Philadelphia in East Falls.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Butler takes home $250 a week for driving a school bus with blind children to a Catholic day school part time. Her health insurance premiums are $517 a month. She pays 76 cents, and Washington picks up the rest. The Supreme Court is expected to rule within a week on whether that subsidy, a key part of President Obama's health-care law, is legal in 34 states. If it decides not, then the West Philadelphia resident's premiums would swell to half her income. "Fortunately for me, I'm pretty healthy," Butler said.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Bob Stewart, For The Inquirer
When workers at Surf City Squeeze clean fruit for the day's juices and smoothies, they use a section of the sink where they also wash dishes. Though that might be usual practice at home, in a commercial setting it would be a health-code violation if the business hadn't secured special permission from the Philadelphia Health Department. Surf City operates in Amtrak's 30th Street Station food court, where retailers and regulators have learned to improvise to fit modern sanitation standards into a historic building.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Perno watched closely as Joshua George sprinkled tomatoes and mozzarella onto flatbread. George, a chef and dietitian, was manning the grill outside the Merchantville Fire Department, making the unusual pizzas for firefighters and their family members Friday as part of a Camden County and Cooper University Health Care program to promote healthy living among local first responders. About 75 percent of firefighters are obese, according to Cooper officials. Perno, 39, has been a volunteer firefighter with the Merchantville department for 13 years.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
On a frosty late February morning, Dennis Doman awoke with the metallic taste of blood in his mouth. Throwing off the blankets, he padded the few steps to the bathroom sink. He coughed and then coughed again. The third time, he spewed blood. He bled so profusely, "I turned my bathroom into a crime scene," he says. Doman called 911 and was rushed to a hospital. The initial diagnosis was a gastrointestinal problem. "I told them no because I can taste blood," remembers Doman, 64. Further tests revealed Doman was right - it wasn't his stomach.
FOOD
June 19, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Bryn & Dane's expands Not too long ago, a guy named Bryn was sharing a room with a guy named Dane. Bryn worked late into the night on his idea for a healthy fast-food restaurant. Dane just wanted a good night's sleep. They're brothers; Bryn is now 30 and Dane is 14. Four years ago, Bryn Davis opened a small smoothie shop that morphed into a well-trafficked cafe in Horsham, a catering arm, and a stand inside the Ambler YMCA. Menu is based on wraps, salads, and smoothies.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross and Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals will begin collaborating July 1 to fund innovations in health care and help identify and potentially give seed money to in-house entrepreneurs. Called the Independence Blue Cross-Jefferson Health Innovation Collaboration, the $2 million partnership will be funded evenly by IBC's Blue Cross Center for Health Care Innovation and Jefferson's Innovation Pillar. The partnership creates an entrepreneur-in-residence at Jefferson and funds a fall 2015 "hackathon," an entrepreneurship curriculum, and a business speaker series for medical students and faculty.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diagonally across from the Walter Rand Transportation Center in Camden, a small strip of storefronts and restaurants attracts a steady stream of people in and out to get fried chicken, look at new cellphones, buy clothing. The scene is set to be replaced with a different sort of bustle as state authorities last week granted preliminary approval to $50 million for a new health sciences building. Stretching from Broadway west to Fifth Street and from Martin Luther King Boulevard south to Stevens Street, the Joint Health Sciences Center and related buildings are meant to bring together Rowan University, Rutgers-Camden, and other medical and educational institutions in the city for teaching and research.
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