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NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
FBI agents raided a Fairhill mental health clinic Monday, two months after a former employee sued, claiming she was fired for questioning what she described as fraudulent Medicaid billing. In April, Sheree Brown of Yeadon sued Juniata Community Mental Health Clinic, claiming its administrator, Sandy Acosta, and director, Carlos Matos, who is also a Democratic ward leader in Kensington, pushed her out of a job last year after she voiced her concerns. Federal authorities would not say whether their search of the practice, at 2637 N. Fifth St., was tied to Brown's allegations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is getting a makeover. It wants new health ideas to go viral. It wants partners in business and government to magnify its impact. And it seeks game-changing ideas from inventors to improve doctor visits and reshape medicine into a "Culture of Health. " The nation's largest health philanthrophy has long been focused on discreet health problems such as smoking and obesity. But in a major policy shift publicly discussed Wednesday for the first time, the Princeton-based foundation is seeking to up its game and inspire mass movements.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
THE AFFORDABLE Care Act has accomplished much: Not only has it given health coverage to millions of Americans who didn't have it, but it provided Republicans with something to galvanize around in their attempts to undermine President Obama. In one respect, the Affordable Care Act has also become a perfect controlled experiment: Almost exactly half the states have accepted a federal expansion of Medicaid as part of ACA, and the other half - all ruled by Republicans - haven't. Medicaid expansion is a feature of the ACA that encourages states to expand enrollment eligibility for Medicaid, and reimburses the states 100 percent of the costs for the first few years, and 90 percent thereafter.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of losing millions of dollars on its outpatient mental health program in Willow Grove, Abington Health is making big changes. It is sending notices this week to 2,200 patients who use its Creekwood Center that the program will close Dec. 1. About one-third will be routed to primary care offices in the system, where they will be treated by new, integrated teams of doctors and social workers. The rest, including 680 patients who received care through a contract with Montgomery County, must find new providers.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Tajiri came to Philadelphia from her Wisconsin birthplace a robust young lioness. But her health was short-lived. Just shy of two years old when she arrived, the playful cat had sailed through her pre-shipment medical clearance, as well as her one-month health quarantine at the Philadelphia Zoo. There, she was observed closely and screened for everything from parasites to feline viruses before being placed in the zoo's Big Cat Falls exhibit....
NEWS
June 3, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state study conducted in the aftermath of the 2012 train derailment in Paulsboro found that more than half of those interviewed reported new or intensified health issues in the days after the accident. Most commonly, residents noted experiencing headaches, respiratory symptoms, and coughing in the week after the Nov. 30 accident, according to the Department of Health report, based on two surveys. In its findings, 58 percent of those interviewed in person and 66 percent of those responding to a mail-in survey said they experienced "new or worsening symptoms" in the week after the derailment, which leaked about 20,000 gallons of toxic vinyl chloride into the atmosphere.
NEWS
May 29, 2014
EVERY ONCE in a while you get a chance to meet two needs with one action. I won't say kill two birds with one stone. This isn't about throwing stones or killing anything - just the opposite. It's about changing public policy to enhance, maybe even to save, lives; and by doing so, possibly providing a political boost to a politician who could use one. First, the policy: Community health centers for poor folks in Philly and across Pennsylvania are hurting. They're losing money big time, according to a new study by George Washington University: $29 million in Pennsylvania this year, half or more of that in Philly.
NEWS
May 29, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
CNN, NPR, and CBS have grilled Scott Charles about the youth violence-prevention program he cofounded at Temple University Hospital. A group of middle-school journalists? No problem. Then the team of reporters from Healthy NewsWorks asked Charles, a trauma outreach coordinator at Temple, how he feels when he must counsel victims of the gun violence his program warns young people about. "I thought, 'Are you kids trying to make me cry?' " said Charles, 47, cofounder of the Cradle to Grave initiative.
NEWS
May 13, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DR. EVELYN B. WIENER was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in late 2010, but she was not about to let the disease either define or sideline her. Evelyn, an internist and longtime executive director of the University of Pennsylvania's Student Health Service, never lost her optimistic view of life, her enthusiasm for her work or her plans for the future. "She worked tirelessly through chemotherapy," her family said. She was so committed to her chosen profession that even after recurring symptoms sent her back to the hospital, she told friends that she fully intended to keep her plans to attend continuing education and conferences in Boston and San Antonio.
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