CollectionsHealth
IN THE NEWS

Health

NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A THIRD psychologist testified yesterday that charter-school founder Dorothy June Brown is competent to stand trial despite some memory issues. Dr. Christine Anthony, a forensic psychologist at Federal Medical Center Carswell in Fort Worth, Texas, is one of five mental-health experts who examined Brown, who is accused of defrauding four schools of $6.3 million and conspiring with other administrators to cover it up. Brown, 77, was scheduled for...
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloria Yocum Marvin, 86, of Cinnaminson, a former social worker who retired as an information specialist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in 1998, died Monday, Jan. 12, at home following a stroke. Mrs. Marvin worked, among others, for St. Christopher's Hospital for Children and the North City Congress in Philadelphia, a son, Charles, said. The website for the congress states in part that its role is "to support older adults to remain living at home with independence. " Mrs. Marvin grew up in Beach Haven, N.J., graduated from Barnegat High School in 1946, and earned an associate's degree in arts at George Washington University in 1949 and a bachelor's in psychology at Rutgers-Camden in 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | BY KIMBERLY GARRISON, For the Daily News
THIS WEEK we celebrated Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. Given recent tragic events in Florida, Missouri, Staten Island and, well, all over America, it's obvious that racism and inequality remain a persistent American problem. It is also worth noting that this year is the 50th anniversary of both the Selma marches and the Voting Rights Act, yet we are still marching and asserting that "black lives matter. " Like all major urban cities, Philadelphia struggles daily with poverty, underperforming and underfunded schools, discrimination and huge disparities around health care, nutrition and fitness.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Lerner, 83, of Philadelphia, a retired mental health association leader, died Tuesday, Jan. 13, of anaplastic thyroid cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Anaplastic is a rare, aggressive form of thyroid cancer. Mr. Lerner graduated from Philadelphia public schools, Temple University, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work, and served in the Army from 1953 to 1955, stationed in Germany. After earning his master's degree, Mr. Lerner became executive director of the Mental Health Association of Camden, and then of the Mental Health Association of Rochester, N.Y. In 1977, he made a final move to become executive director of the Mental Health Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The jury-rigged health-care program for the working poor crafted on Gov. Corbett's orders recently cleared a legal hurdle. A federal judge refused to block it despite evidence that Healthy PA, a substitute for Medicare expansion under the federal health-care reform law, needlessly reduces coverage for many of the 600,000 Pennsylvanians affected. But the program faces additional legal and practical challenges. While state officials reported this month that more than 100,000 households had applied to Healthy PA, advocates say these uninsured residents have encountered a maze of confusing and contradictory requirements to obtain the new coverage over the last six weeks.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying a priority is to expand Medicaid to hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians, Gov.-elect Tom Wolf on Saturday named two cabinet members with experience expanding coverage under President Obama's Affordable Care Act. Wolf reached south of the border to tap Theodore "Ted" Dallas, currently the secretary of the Maryland Department of Human Resources, to be his secretary of human services. The agency serves the most vulnerable by providing cash aid, home-heating help and health care for the poor, foster care and adoption services, child abuse protection, and support for the aging and people with intellectual disabilities.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The drama continued at Don Tollefson's fraud trial Thursday, when the former sportscaster complained of high blood sugar levels, ending the day's proceedings less than two hours after they began. Tollefson, 62, who has type 2 diabetes, had faced a second round of cross-examination by a Bucks County prosecutor over his charity's expenses. But Tollefson was instead taken to Doylestown Hospital by a Bucks County sheriff's deputy. Tollefson had told Bucks County Court Judge Rea Boylan that his blood-monitoring device showed dangerously high levels of blood sugar before arriving at court.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
For close to a decade, a group of Camden health-care providers has used a database of information culled from the city's three hospitals to evaluate medical costs, identify hot spots in neighborhoods, and develop outreach programs. Soon, the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers will also be able to look at data from the criminal justice system, housing, and other public networks - information it hopes will lead the way to root causes of recurring problems. "You may have people who are calling for an ambulance numerous times, having contacts with the police and having contact with various city agencies," said Aaron Truchil, an associate director for the nonprofit coalition.
REAL_ESTATE
January 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A couple of years ago, friends in Society Hill listed their historic restoration for sale and were more than a bit surprised by prospective buyers' reaction to their nearly 200-year-old house. There was a bathroom on each of four floors, all well-maintained. Yet because the bathrooms did not look like the ones on HGTV, the house-hunters wanted the sellers to upgrade at a cost of thousands of dollars before they'd take another look. I asked several real estate agents about it. The response was, in effect, "Welcome to our world.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly half of food-borne-illness outbreaks are linked to restaurant food. The microbes that cause them are invisible and taste just fine. So how can you lower your odds of getting sick? "Go look at the bathroom," suggests Ken Gruen, a retired Philadelphia restaurant inspector ("sanitarian") who advises food establishments at Philadelphia International Airport. "If the bathroom is kept in good condition - it's clean, there is soap, there are paper towels, there is not a lot of litter on the floor - probably the kitchen is the same.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|