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Healthy Food

NEWS
October 1, 2014
IN THESE DAYS of growing income inequality, the rich get richer and the poor get . . . diabetes. And heart disease. And cancer. A recent study of the eating habits of 29,124 Americans by the Harvard School of Public Health verified a widening "food gap" between the poor and everyone else. While people at higher income levels are eating more healthy foods than they were 12 years ago, low-income Americans are lagging even farther behind. Poor eating habits, and the obesity that often results, are strongly tied to a host of chronic (and expensive to treat)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2014
WITH ALL the tempting choices out there, most, if not all of us, struggle with cooking at home. Home-cooked meals from scratch are likely more nutritious and better for overall health. But these days, with our mainly sedentary, round-the-clock lifestyles, it is increasingly difficult for people to carve out the time to plan, shop and prepare nutritious meals at home. Budgeting, planning, shopping and preparing healthy meals can be particularly challenging when resources are slim and money is tight.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
CHILDREN with special needs take their parents on a very particular and personal journey. For Deb Lutz, the latest leg of that journey is today's opening, in Marlton, N.J., of b.good, a fast-casual eatery celebrating healthful cuisine that is locally sourced and seasonally inspired. Lutz is just the fourth franchisee of this New England-based restaurant started by two boyhood buddies in Boston. She plans to open five b.good locations, including one in Philly and another near her Bryn Mawr home.
NEWS
March 1, 2014
Slowly eating right Our experience at the Sunday Suppers program has shown that residents with limited access to healthy food do not make changes just because these foods are available ("Little sign of better health in N. Phila.," Feb. 14). As reported, increased access is a key first step in improving diet and decreasing obesity. But complementary programs are needed to engage consumers and provide them with information and skills. At Sunday Suppers, families set goals like eating more fruits and vegetables, drinking fewer sugary beverages, and exercising more.
FOOD
February 28, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haile Johnston and his wife, Tatiana Garcia-Granados, never set out to change the world. Just their neighborhood. But since moving to Strawberry Mansion in 2002, these University of Pennsylvania Wharton School grads have set up summer camps and after-school programs, planted hundreds of trees and flowers, and promoted farmer's markets and food pantries, all of which led to this bigger challenge: How to bring reasonably priced, seasonal food,...
TRAVEL
October 7, 2013 | By Christa Sywulak-Herr, For The Inquirer
I have a hard enough time compromising on "where/what to eat" with my two boys and husband when we are standing in the middle of the fifth-largest city in the United States, brimming with options. We may have our four differing opinions on what we want to eat, but we all agree good, tasty, healthy food trumps anything else. So it's no surprise that road trips pose a higher degree of difficulty in that process. On a recent nine-hour drive to Toronto, all of our time was spent on state turnpikes and thruways littered with the same fast-food chains that quite literally repulsed us at every turn.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Chester, a city where hard times often plow under shiny promises, a hunger-relief agency's pledge to build America's first nonprofit supermarket was greeted skeptically at first. But Philabundance may be confounding local doubters. Its Fare & Square grocery store, seven years in the making, is ready to open its doors Saturday morning, a rare oasis in what has been called a food desert. "No one believed this was coming," said Denina Hood, a Chester native and an employee of the store that will become the first supermarket in town since 2001.
NEWS
August 19, 2013
It would be morally repugnant to allow food assistance to dry up at a time of heightened need. But a $5 billion boost in yearly food-stamp funding - added under the 2009 stimulus to help more Americans get enough to eat during the recession - is set to expire on Nov. 1. The loss would affect 1.8 million Pennsylvanians and 900,000 New Jerseyans. The reduction would cost a family of four 21 meals a month - "devastating arithmetic for families already living either on the edge or within the abyss of poverty," The Inquirer's Alfred Lubrano wrote.
FOOD
July 19, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost six years ago, longtime registered dietitian Mary Ann Moylan traded her job at Lehigh Valley Hospital for what might strike some as a strange choice. She'd be doing the same counseling, educating, and advocating for smart food choices, but inside the Giant Super Food Store in Willow Grove, an hour's commute from her Allentown home. "This is where we should be, on the preventive side, helping people stay healthy," Moylan says, "instead of getting them to eat healthy after they get sick.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Tuesday, a new kind of food pantry for the poor - featuring exclusively healthful foods - opened in Kensington. The Green Light Pantry, the first of its kind in the city, promotes healthy eating while batting back hunger. "I don't eat healthy much," said pantry client Ebony Culbreath, 20, a formerly homeless woman who filled a shopping basket with her daughter, Kaliyah, 2, on Tuesday. "This stuff is outside my comfort zone. But my daughter eats all of it. " In the fight against hunger, it's not always the most nutritious foods that are used.
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