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Healthy Habits

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NEWS
April 22, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kris Sumey went to Temple University's Liacouras Center yesterday because, she said, "My whole family is overweight. " Sylvaneta Lewis' motivation was her 8-year-old daughter, who "is overweight for her age. " The two mothers were among 550 people registered for a conference run by Shaping America's Youth (SAY), a nonprofit group based in Portland, Ore., aimed at educating parents and other caregivers about childhood obesity. For years the medical community has urged overweight Americans to eat less, eat healthy and exercise.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Seniors a lot younger than W. James Cassels of Springfield, Delaware County, should envy his energy. At age 71, he jogs, plays basketball, swims, bikes, golfs and visits the gym regularly. Last summer, Jim, as he is known, participated in the Delaware County Senior Olympic Games for the first time and came home with seven medals in three sports. He presented one of them, a silver award for freestyle swimming, to a cardiologist "who gave me back my life. " Despite his lean and healthy appearance at 5 feet, 9 inches and 160 pounds, Cassels lives with a heart transplant and a pacemaker, and he knows that lots of exercise is more than a good health practice.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | Special to The Inquirer / JIM ROESES
Healthy habits were the objective as a team of medical personnel visited St. Catherine of Siena School in Horsham last Thursday. Above, Giggles the clown, played by Patricia Slavin, checks the heartbeat of second grader Collin Schmidt, as Chris Bell (center) and John Blank watch. At right, X-ray technician Craig Lawson talks to a third-grade class.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The state Senate voted unanimously yesterday to require public school teachers to tell girls how to examine themselves for breast cancer, legislation that apparently would make New Jersey the first state in the country with such a statutory requirement, experts said. The bill, aimed at fostering healthy habits more than screening for actual cancer, still must be introduced and debated in the Assembly, and then signed by Gov. Whitman. It was hailed by the American Cancer Society and education officials, although some disagreed with the narrowness of the approach.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
It's official - we're living in the City of Brotherly Love Handles. Philadelphia has been rated the fattest city in America, says Men's Fitness magazine. The survey blames among other things the proliferation here of pizza parlors and fast-food joints. "Home to the Liberty Bell and the eponymous cheesesteak sandwich, [Philadelphia] scores high in history but low in healthy habits," wrote Keith Griffiths in his cover story in the January issue of the magazine. But Philadelphia's once-portly mayor, who recently lost weight on the Atkin's diet, said he's living proof that it's possible to keep your weight down while living in the city where a TastyKake is finger food.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
CHILDREN'S Hospital of Philadelphia is part of a national study called the Today trial, which is investigating ways to treat Type 2 diabetes in children and teens. One question being asked is whether intensive efforts to improve eating and exercise habits can help control young patients' blood sugar, and the hospital is pairing kids with "personal assistants to the lifestyle intervention" - PALs for short - to help make healthy habits stick. "It's very hands-on," says Dr. Lorraine Levitt Katz, a pediatric endocrinologist who's leading the Today study at CHOP.
NEWS
September 13, 2004
To promote youth fitness, President John F. Kennedy commissioned a catchy exercise record for kids called "Chicken Fat," sung by Robert Preston of Music Man fame. Many kids who grew up in the '60s and '70s still feel the burn. "Touchdown, ev'ry morning - 10 times. Not just, now and then. Give that chicken fat back to the chicken, and don't be chicken again. No, don't be chicken again. " The idea was simple: Children needed more exercise, and daily calisthenics could make a difference.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
IN THE MOOD If you're trying to relax, avoid records billed solely as "easy listening" and reach instead for the type of music you usually enjoy. "Mood music" can do more to put people on edge than silence can, two Penn State researchers found during seven years of work at the university's Altoona campus. ANIMAL RIGHTS The fur is still flying in the animal-rights debate. When 1,004 adults nationwide were surveyed for Parents magazine, 85 percent disapproved of killing animals to make fur coats and 81 percent disapproved of cosmetics research on animals.
NEWS
December 30, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting next week, the mayoral policy on fatty hoagies is changing. No more mayonnaise. No more oil. No more photo-ops with the city's mayor gorging himself on processed luncheon meats. After Mayor-elect John F. Street is sworn in Monday, the preferred sandwich of the Philadelphia Mayor's Office will be a vegetarian cheesesteak made with wheat gluten. No beef. And Street is encouraging Philadelphians to make it their favorite, too. At a news conference yesterday at Reading Terminal Market with the editor of Men's Fitness magazine, Street bit into a cheeseless wheat-gluten steak with gusto and announced that he would make healthy living and physical fitness a major part of his focus as mayor.
FOOD
May 3, 2007
Friday, May 4 Five-course dinner prepared by executive chef J.C. Nunez, including oyster with mignonette aspic and herb-roasted filet of veal and more, with white wines from Robert Mondavi Winery; hosted by the winery's associate winemaker Rich Arnold. $95 includes museum admission. 6 p.m. at the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Museum Restaurant, 26th Street and the Parkway. For further information or reservations visit www.philamuseum.org/dining or call 215-235-7469. Monday, May 7 Philadelphia Food: Past, Present and Future , book launch of The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink , with discussion with editor Andrew F. Smith and others on the history of local foodways and the importance of food in shaping Philadelphia's identity today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2014
FIT AND FINE at 44, Ron Wood has seemingly accomplished the impossible. The Philadelphia native is a master of capoeira contra, a third-degree black belt, a choreographer, entrepreneur and hip-hop artist. But all that accomplishment hasn't gone to his head. "I'm never the best, there's always something to work on, and I still feel like I'm just learning my body," he told me. Born and raised in West Philadelphia, the humble Wood overcame poverty and escaped the street's many traps.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I have recently developed what I consider to be a very healthy lifestyle. I exercise and eat lots of fruits and vegetables and mostly whole foods. My problem is I think I may be becoming obsessed. It has become harder and harder to eat away from home. I constantly plan what I'm going to eat next. Apparently, there's a disorder similar to anorexia known as orthorexia. It's the psychological obsession with eating healthy. I don't think I could be classified as an extreme case, but what should I do before I become one?
NEWS
August 11, 2012
Financially happy One doesn't need a "happiness study" to understand that adequate finances are required to maintain good health, enjoy leisure activities, and feel in control of one's life ("Federal Reserve chairman is asking: Are you happy?" Tuesday). Ben Bernanke's failing monetary policies have all but eliminated income on individual savings while enabling banks to enjoy increased profit margins and return to business as usual. The same banks, with the help of the government's elimination of the Glass-Steagall Act and other regulations, largely contributed to the recession.
NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sister Helen Thomas, the "hands-on" principal at St. Laurence Catholic School in Upper Darby, has brought technology to her school in a big way. Emilia Rastrick, a gym teacher at Lingelbach School in Philadelphia's Germantown section, launched a dragon-boat league to promote healthy lifestyles and cooperation among middle-school students. And Sherman Denby, a science teacher at the Cherry Street School in Bridgeton, N.J., quietly goes out of his way to help his low-income students and their families.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008
CHILDREN'S Hospital of Philadelphia is part of a national study called the Today trial, which is investigating ways to treat Type 2 diabetes in children and teens. One question being asked is whether intensive efforts to improve eating and exercise habits can help control young patients' blood sugar, and the hospital is pairing kids with "personal assistants to the lifestyle intervention" - PALs for short - to help make healthy habits stick. "It's very hands-on," says Dr. Lorraine Levitt Katz, a pediatric endocrinologist who's leading the Today study at CHOP.
NEWS
November 26, 2007 | By Colleen Dunn INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kelly Hough started dieting at 13. One at a time, she moved through a sea of options: Jenny Craig, NutriSystem, Slim.Fast, Herbalife, the Cabbage Soup Diet, and, most recently, Atkins. Last month at Whole Foods, her approach was different. Zipping up the produce aisle, Hough grabbed a plastic-wrapped package of precut cauliflower. That's OK, her shopping companion said. But don't forget that cut vegetables expose more surface area to oxygen, reducing their nutritional value. This was their third grocery store tour.
FOOD
May 3, 2007
Friday, May 4 Five-course dinner prepared by executive chef J.C. Nunez, including oyster with mignonette aspic and herb-roasted filet of veal and more, with white wines from Robert Mondavi Winery; hosted by the winery's associate winemaker Rich Arnold. $95 includes museum admission. 6 p.m. at the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Museum Restaurant, 26th Street and the Parkway. For further information or reservations visit www.philamuseum.org/dining or call 215-235-7469. Monday, May 7 Philadelphia Food: Past, Present and Future , book launch of The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink , with discussion with editor Andrew F. Smith and others on the history of local foodways and the importance of food in shaping Philadelphia's identity today.
NEWS
April 22, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kris Sumey went to Temple University's Liacouras Center yesterday because, she said, "My whole family is overweight. " Sylvaneta Lewis' motivation was her 8-year-old daughter, who "is overweight for her age. " The two mothers were among 550 people registered for a conference run by Shaping America's Youth (SAY), a nonprofit group based in Portland, Ore., aimed at educating parents and other caregivers about childhood obesity. For years the medical community has urged overweight Americans to eat less, eat healthy and exercise.
NEWS
July 27, 2006 | By Beverly Black
When I was a kid, I was what we called chunky. I think if I were growing up today, I'd be known as super chunky deluxe. I mean, I used to walk to and from school. I even came home for lunch, so I walked the round-trip twice. On Sundays, we walked to and from church, seven blocks each way. I rode my bike to my friend's house and then we rode around the neighborhood. I drank milk at every meal, and if the family ate dinner out it was because it was somebody's birthday or someone had graduated from something.
NEWS
September 13, 2004
To promote youth fitness, President John F. Kennedy commissioned a catchy exercise record for kids called "Chicken Fat," sung by Robert Preston of Music Man fame. Many kids who grew up in the '60s and '70s still feel the burn. "Touchdown, ev'ry morning - 10 times. Not just, now and then. Give that chicken fat back to the chicken, and don't be chicken again. No, don't be chicken again. " The idea was simple: Children needed more exercise, and daily calisthenics could make a difference.
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