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Hearing Aids

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BUSINESS
April 7, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The forlorn man in the hearing-aid ad said he used to dread going out with his friends. "Background noise kept me from joining in the conversation," until a new type of hearing aid, a Miracle Ear Clarifier, ended his social isolation, according to the television advertisement. "Now I can hear and understand just fine even in noisy restaurants," the smiling Miracle Ear user gushed. Such glowing testimonials were just noise, according to state officials. Claims that Miracle Ear hearing aids with Clarifier circuits could eliminate background noise, allowing users to understand conversation in noisy environments, are "false and misleading," according to settlements filed yesterday by attorneys general in 36 states, including Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 28, 2001 | By Sidney B. Kurtz
Being a senior, I quite naturally come in contact with many other seniors. At the Jewish Community Center and M'kor Shalom, or at any synagogue or church, you can meet seniors by the dozens. Some are fairly well off financially, while many must live on less-than-adequate limited incomes. If you speak to a senior and get no answer, chances are he or she suffers from some degree of hearing loss. So why don't they take advantage of the relief that hearing aids might give them? First, take this quickie quiz: What's the size of an average microwave oven, contains myriad microchips and countless other electronic parts, is able to compute at lightning speed, and costs about $1,000?
NEWS
December 31, 2008
Health insurers in New Jersey are now legally required to cover hearing aids for children. Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey signed "Grace's Law" yesterday, requiring insurers to cover the cost of hearing aids for children 15 and younger. The benefit can be capped at $1,000 per hearing aid every 24 months. Codey is filling in while Gov. Corzine is away for the holidays. The estimated cost to the state is $348,000 per year for the next three years for children insured under state programs.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Decker had all the signs. He often missed things that actors said on TV. Hearing in crowds was a challenge. And when he came home each day from work in a noisy data center, where cooling fans whirred nonstop, his wife would tell him he talked too loudly. Why not get hearing aids? A big reason: the cost. Decker, 70, of Northeast Philadelphia, learned what millions of aging baby boomers are starting to discover. High-end devices can cost $6,000 a pair, and most insurance plans cover a fraction of the cost at best.
LIVING
October 18, 1988 | By Dianna Sinovic, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Honneger has a tiny magnet in her head that helps her hear better. The 64-year-old retired Temple University biology professor had the dime- size magnet implanted just behind her right ear in February. The rare-earth magnet holds a small external hearing device in place and they vibrate the mastoid bone, allowing her ear to pick up sound. "For four or five hours, I forget it's there," said Honneger, who still sometimes wears her conventional hearing aid. The implantable hearing device, called a Xomed Audiant Bone Conductor, is one of the latest advances available to the hearing impaired.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2003 | By Markus Verbeet INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some people start a business because they want to help others. John Stephenson wanted, first of all, to help himself. When the retired aerospace engineer bought hearing aids for himself in the mid-1990s, he did not like purchasing them through the usual source: audiologists. They regularly dispense, fit and adjust hearing aids, a process that sometimes requires several visits. Stephenson said he thought: "There should be a simpler, more affordable way. " So he invented a computer tool that serves as a shortcut, allowing customers to use their PCs and the Internet to fine-tune their hearing aids without a visit to an audiologist.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At age 6, Elienne Lawson came home from school and made an announcement. "Peace is too important to be left to the politicians," she told her parents. "I'm going to Russia to do something about this. " Soon after, the elementary schooler traveled to the Soviet Union as part of an international project to show the children of the world they were all, basically, the same. She was the youngest ambassador to the Soviets ever. "Elienne's always been an unusual child," said her father, Greg.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Rea Rossi, sound has always been a tricky thing: elusive and slippery, wrangled only with therapy, concentration, and excellent hearing aids. So Rossi, 29, an artist based in Fishtown, began contemplating how to capture it and make it tangible, solid enough to wrap around a wrist or drape over her shoulders. The resulting artworks - visualizations meant to represent sound waves created in a computer-assisted design program and 3D-printed from nylon - are somewhere on the spectrum between jewelry and sculpture.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
NEWARK, N.J. - Media day in the Prudential Center was loud, and of course, silly, with "reporters" dressed in see-through lace dresses and as Waldo. (But sadly, not as Waldo in a see-through lace dress.) Derrick Coleman did fine with the silly. The "loud" could have been a problem, had the Seattle Seahawks' fullback not been tucked away at the back of yesterday's hurly-burly. "As long as you're looking at me, I can read your lips, and we're good to go," said Coleman, the first deaf offensive player in the NFL. He wears hearing aids in both ears.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Those tiny little batteries that power hearing aids and watches are more potent than they look. They are packed with mercury, a substance that can be hazardous even after the batteries run out of steam. Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc. is starting a pilot recycling project in Falls Township to keep the batteries out of household garbage sent to landfills and incinerators. "Mercury needs to be taken out of the solid-waste stream," said Christine Meket, public-relations manager for Wheelabrator's mid-Atlantic region.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Rea Rossi, sound has always been a tricky thing: elusive and slippery, wrangled only with therapy, concentration, and excellent hearing aids. So Rossi, 29, an artist based in Fishtown, began contemplating how to capture it and make it tangible, solid enough to wrap around a wrist or drape over her shoulders. The resulting artworks - visualizations meant to represent sound waves created in a computer-assisted design program and 3D-printed from nylon - are somewhere on the spectrum between jewelry and sculpture.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN DOROTHY Donnelly Caparella found out she was qualified to join the Daughters of the American Revolution, she wasn't impressed. Turns out an ancestor on her father's side of the family, Francis Stimmel, fought in the Revolutionary War, enabling Dottie to become a member of the iconic DAR, long a passionate promoter of patriotism and the American way. Dottie was not impressed. It wasn't that Dottie lacked interest in her family history. She was a devoted family matriarch who always put her family's needs ahead of her own. But the DAR didn't interest her. Dorothy L. Donnelly Caparella, one-time part owner of a hearing-aid store in Southampton, a dedicated traveler who was frequently on the go, often looking for a place where she could get a good meal, a loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died Friday.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The duPont Hospital for Children had too few of the little wagons that young patients prefer to wheelchairs, so Peter Zucca started a foundation to raise money for a fleet of them. A patient couldn't get blood for a transfusion, so Peter planned a series of drives, the first to be held Monday. And when he saw that most books about the challenge of childhood hearing loss "are really bad," he wrote his own. At age 12, Peter Zucca has already had a world of experience with cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Friends unfailingly describe Eileen McDonnell, a retired public school speech and hearing therapist, as "quiet" and "reserved. " Except when the conversation turns to nature. Watch her eyes widen and her speech grow animated! "She effervesces," says Andrea V. McCabe, development director at Foulkeways at Gwynedd, the Quaker-affiliated continuing-care retirement community in Montgomery County. McDonnell, 83, formerly of Harleysville, has lived at Foulkeways for a decade, and from Day 1 she's been "effervescing" about the place, trying to boost awareness of the 110-acre campus' flora and fauna.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Decker had all the signs. He often missed things that actors said on TV. Hearing in crowds was a challenge. And when he came home each day from work in a noisy data center, where cooling fans whirred nonstop, his wife would tell him he talked too loudly. Why not get hearing aids? A big reason: the cost. Decker, 70, of Northeast Philadelphia, learned what millions of aging baby boomers are starting to discover. High-end devices can cost $6,000 a pair, and most insurance plans cover a fraction of the cost at best.
SPORTS
February 1, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
JERSEY CITY, N.J. - There might be a time in the Super Bowl when the Seattle Seahawks' Derrick Coleman cannot hear quarterback Russell Wilson make a call at the line of scrimmage. So the fullback will get Wilson's attention and read his lips. Coleman is legally deaf. He wears hearing aids. He said that if a normal-hearing person is an eight, nine, or 10 on a scale of zero to 10, he would qualify as a two without the hearing aids and a six, seven, or eight with the hearing aids - "depending on the day. " He's believed to be the first legally deaf offensive player in the NFL. The story has generated attention in recent weeks, and especially this week with the Seahawks taking center stage.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
NEWARK, N.J. - Media day in the Prudential Center was loud, and of course, silly, with "reporters" dressed in see-through lace dresses and as Waldo. (But sadly, not as Waldo in a see-through lace dress.) Derrick Coleman did fine with the silly. The "loud" could have been a problem, had the Seattle Seahawks' fullback not been tucked away at the back of yesterday's hurly-burly. "As long as you're looking at me, I can read your lips, and we're good to go," said Coleman, the first deaf offensive player in the NFL. He wears hearing aids in both ears.
NEWS
May 19, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I visited Mother Mary, but it wasn't all laughs. I had a night free on book tour in Naples, Fla., so I made the trip to Miami to take her out to dinner for Mother's Day. I arrived to pick her up, but she wasn't dressed, because she had decided she didn't want to go. "We should stay home and order Papa John," she said, frowning. "Ma, you can't have Papa John's on Mother's Day. " "Why not?" "Let me take you out. " "No. " "Please. It's my Mother's Day, too. " "Hmph.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | By Martha Irvine, Associated Press
WINNETKA, Ill. - What if you knew, even before your child was born, that she wouldn't look like everyone else? Clara Beatty's parents knew. They were living in Belgium at the time, a decade ago. Prenatal screening was extensive, probably more than would have been done in the United States. Those tests determined that baby Clara, their third child, was likely to be a perfectly normal kid inside. ButĀ even in the womb, doctors could see severe facial deformities - droopy eyes, under-developed cheekbones, and a tiny jaw. It meant she would need a tube in her neck to help her breathe after birth.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I cheaped out on Mother Mary for Christmas. I didn't mean to, actually. What really happened was that I gave up. I surrendered. You can't buy present for Mother Mary without a fistfight. Here's what happened. A month before Christmas, I started asking her what she wanted, but I should have known better. Joking aside, she's the best and most unselfish mother on the planet. So I know that she doesn't want me to spend money on her. That she would rather I didn't worry about her. That she would prefer it if I got gifts for Francesca instead.
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