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Hearing Loss

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NEWS
March 6, 1992 | By Karen Auge, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
More than 150 steelworkers, who contend that years of laboring in the roar of the Fairless Works plant caused their hearing losses, will share nearly $9 million in compensation from USX Corp. Under terms of an agreement reached with lawyers representing the workers this week, the steel company will compensate current and former employees of its Bucks County mill who had brought claims for worker's compensation. The money will be divided according to a formula that considers a number of factors, including the degree of hearing loss, the number of years the worker spent at the plant and the worker's age. Lawyers representing the workers and the company devised the formula.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Union leaders are unhappy with a new state law backed by Lukens Steel that redefines how claims for hearing loss are to be handled. Spokesmen for the state AFL-CIO and the United Steelworkers, which represents Lukens workers, said the legislation would substantially curtail the rights of workers to collect for hearing loss suffered on the job. Supporters of the law contend that it actually will be fairer in operation than the previous system...
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A bill co-sponsored by State Sen. Earl M. Baker would virtually eliminate the rights of Pennsylvania employees to collect workers' compensation for job- related hearing loss, according to state union leaders. "The bill itself is a loser. It would knock out all the claims for hearing loss," said David Wilderman, legislative director for the Pennsylvania AFL- CIO. On the other side of the issue, though, a coalition of more than 270 corporations in Pennsylvania say the bill is needed to stem what has become a flood of hearing-loss cases.
NEWS
January 27, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For the last 10 years, the Hearing Discovery Center in Darby, a nonprofit agency staffed mostly by volunteers, has ministered to the needs of thousands of senior citizens and other people suffering from hearing loss. With grants and contributions, it has trained counselors and set up a library of assistive hearing devices that it lends free of charge. When clients find a device that works for them, they return it after a week and are advised where they can buy the item and what the price range is. The center stocks about 75 such devices, and, according to the center's coordinator, Claire Carroll, is the only free operation of its kind in the three-state area.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
All day long, the presses rise and fall with a thunderous roar, stamping metal into hoods and tailgates, and pounding Robert Neal's ears. After 6 1/2 years as a press operator, he often can't hear a ringing telephone or ordinary conversation at home. Richard Vizzarri has had a quieter job in the Budd Co. Hunting Park plant for 12 years, but he'll never forget the time, back when he worked on the presses, that he lost his hearing completely for three days. Budd worker James Todd never touches a press, but, after three months off work for a hand injury, he still carries the ringing in his head from the air hoses that whistle nonstop in the room where he works as a welder.
NEWS
January 4, 2005 | By Elaine Procida
The surprise of my life has to be one day in Miss Singer's sixth-grade class at Anthony Wayne in South Philadelphia. By that time, I had no illusions that school would be anything more than passing from one frustrating year to the next. My preschool year had been a happy one, and I became the teacher's pet. Often called on, I sometimes did not respond, which was how my hearing loss was noticed. My mother denied it, unable to believe her talkative, lively daughter was slowly going deaf.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU This article includes information from the Associated Press
Gov. Ridge underwent surgery yesterday to remove a small cyst from inside his right ear, and doctors expressed confidence that the operation would halt his hearing loss. Dr. Donald Kamerer performed the two-hour procedure, called an atticomastoidectomy, at the Eye and Ear Institute at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The governor, who was put under general anesthesia, was wheeled out of the recovery room and "cracking jokes" about 11:20 a.m., said Tim Reeves, Ridge's spokesman.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | By Cindy Anders, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More than 200 current and former employees of Lukens Inc. have filed claims for workers' compensation contending that noise at the Coatesville steel mill has damaged their hearing. The claims, seeking payment for medical expenses and a cash stipend for each person, follow the pattern of filings by workers at the defunct Fairless Works USX Corp. steel plant in Bucks County. Ultimately, USX paid $8.5 million to 150 steelworkers. Joseph L. Della Guardia, the Philadelphia lawyer processing the Lukens claims, said he began filing the claims two weeks ago after more than 400 workers responded to his firm's radio and newspaper advertisements for free hearing tests.
LIVING
June 15, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two-day-old Leilonnie Gilchrist was sleeping in her bassinet at Temple University Hospital when a small probe was placed in her left ear. The probe started to emit rapid clicking sounds that sent back a signal to a nearby computer. Colorful graphs flashed on the screen. In less than 20 seconds, the test confirmed the baby could hear the sounds. Much like the ritual of counting toes and checking heart rates, the hearing test is fast becoming part of the routine evaluation newborns receive before leaving the hospital.
NEWS
March 8, 1995 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deep within Gov. Ridge's right ear something abnormal is happening. It's a common ear condition that can cause serious hearing loss or other damage if left untreated. But doctors expect no such problems for the 49-year- old governor, who will undergo surgery Friday. Usually caused by repeated ear infections, the condition, known as cholesteatoma, involves a growth of dead skin cells that gradually blocks up the middle ear. Ridge, who wears a hearing aid on his left ear, will undergo surgery Friday morning at the University of Pittsburgh's Eye and Ear Pavilion to correct the developing problem in his right.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A hearing test given to Pennsylvania 11th graders every year may be failing to identify most of those with hearing loss, according to a study led by Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Part of the reason, the authors say, is that the test does not measure hearing ability at higher frequencies - the very ones that teenagers are likely to have trouble hearing after frequent exposure to loud music and other noise. State health officials say they are aware of the findings, published earlier this year in the Journal of Medical Screening, but are waiting for additional research before making any changes.
SPORTS
May 16, 2014
FLYERS FORWARD Steve Downie was to have surgery yesterday on his right ear to alleviate hearing loss resulting from a fight with Washington's Aaron Volpatti on Nov. 1. The 27-year-old forward, acquired the day before from Colorado for Max Talbot, slogged through a lost season as a result of the injury. He is set to become an unrestricted free agent on July 1. Flyers defenseman Nicklas Grossmann will begin rehabbing his surgically repaired right ankle this week. His full recovery is expected in 6 to 8 weeks.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Decker had all the signs. He often missed things that actors said on TV. Hearing in crowds was a challenge. And when he came home each day from work in a noisy data center, where cooling fans whirred nonstop, his wife would tell him he talked too loudly. Why not get hearing aids? A big reason: the cost. Decker, 70, of Northeast Philadelphia, learned what millions of aging baby boomers are starting to discover. High-end devices can cost $6,000 a pair, and most insurance plans cover a fraction of the cost at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'So . . . how did you two meet?" It's what one family member says to another when the latter brings home a prospective mate. Especially somebody different. Unexpected. As in "S/he's not one of us, is s/he? How did this happen?" How indeed is what's explored in Tribes , by English playwright Nina Raine, now being presented by Philadelphia Theatre Company at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre in a coproduction with Pittsburgh's City Theatre Company. Billy (Tad Cooley) is the deaf son of an extremely verbal English family.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Noise is so ubiquitous you might not even notice that you've forgotten what silence sounds like. There are sirens, buses, planes, squealing brakes, and hostile horns if you frequent the city, and lawn mowers, leaf blowers, snow blowers, and over-vigilant dogs if you don't. There's whatever you're blasting through your ear buds, voices from the next 12 cubicles over, jarring cellphone ring tones, the television, children screaming, roaring sports fans, restaurants so loud you have laryngitis when you leave, snoring.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
Exposure to tobacco smoke while in the womb can lead to diminished hearing by adolescence, doctors have found in the first study ever to link tobacco use and hearing impairment. The new research by Michael Weitzman and Anil Lalwani of the NYU-Langone School of Medicine suggests compounds in tobacco smoke cross the placenta and harm the auditory system. In the past, doctors have linked low birth weight, asthma, sudden infant death syndrome, and recurrent ear infections to both maternal smoking and exposure of the mother to secondhand smoke while pregnant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My wife of 25 years has an annoying habit that drives me crazy. When she starts a conversation with me, she'll speak in a very low voice and mumble without looking at me. I truly cannot hear or understand what she's saying and have to respond with, "Excuse me?" "Pardon me?" or "What?" When I speak to her, I make sure I talk clearly and in a loud enough voice, but she always throws the same remarks back at me - "Excuse me?" etc. She doesn't do this with anyone else.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2011
T HE GIZMO: Maxell Kids Safe Headphones. GIMME A BREAK: It's a relief when the kids have earphones on a long road trip. Beats grown-up you being forced to listen to their repetitive video-game noises, teenybop tunes or jarring cartoon sound tracks. But while you're enjoying the calm, the kids may be doing themselves permanent damage, warns the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Listening too loudly for too long on headphones can lead to noise-induced hearing loss.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Strachota, 71, formerly of Wallingford, who taught hearing-impaired children in Delaware County for 36 years, died of kidney cancer Wednesday, June 15, at White Horse Village in Newtown Square. Ms. Strachota spent her professional career working with hard-of-hearing children at Delaware County Intermediate Unit in Morton. She believed most children born with a hearing loss could learn to speak and to "listen" by reading lips and using hearing aids, said Marcia Finisdore, whose three children inherited hearing loss from her and were taught by Ms. Strachota.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My heart ached after reading the letter from "Stumped in California," who wondered what could be done about an older co-worker, "Anita," who she said was showing "signs of dementia. " I would caution her about making judgments based on stereotypes of older workers and their health problems. Like Anita, I am in my late 60s. I am also underwater in my mortgage, which means I have no nest egg. Because my husband is unemployed, my savings have been depleted. My short-term memory is poor, and the meds I am on to help me function do not improve my memory.
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