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Hearings

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NEWS
November 13, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
City Council's hearings on Philadelphia's energy future should be quite a show, rich with spectacle and irony. The hearings, expected to start today and continue Friday, are in lieu of real consideration of a $1.86 billion deal to sell the Philadelphia Gas Works to Connecticut-based UIL Holdings Corp. Council's schedule coincides with state Public Utility Commission hearings on PGW's high rates and rotting pipes, so Council members clearly want the attention - and voters should provide it, especially since they're all up for reelection next year.
NEWS
February 1, 2013
WHILE PRESIDENT Obama and other elected officials everywhere look for ways to deal with gun violence, Philadelphia City Council wants to be involved in the debate. Councilman Jim Kenney introduced a resolution Thursday calling for hearings to review how effectively the city spends its resources to combat gun violence. "I think if cities' primary responsibility is public safety, we need to see if [District Attorney] Seth [Williams and] Police Commissioner [Charles] Ramsey are getting the resources they need," Kenney said.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board said today that it scheduled hearings for four applicants vying for the second of two state licenses to run a resort casino with as many as 600 slot machines and 50 table games. The 10 a.m. hearings, to be held in the municipalities where would-be operators want to locate a casino, are: Aug. 30, Hampden Township, Cumberland County, regarding the application of Penn Harris Gaming L.P. Aug. 31, Cumberland Township, Adams County, regarding Mason-Dixon Resorts L.P. Sept.
NEWS
January 10, 1988 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
At the request of a township resident, the East Marlborough supervisors will re-open hearings on reducing housing density in the Willowdale area, where a townhouse development has been proposed. Cuyler Walker, one of three landowners who had petitioned the supervisors to reduce the allowed density to prevent possible construction of 238 townhouses, on Monday asked the supervisors to reopen hearings on the petition. Walker said that private negotiations to reduce the number of planned townhouses had broken down between the landowners and C.L.X.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
If a quick survey of public opinion in Center City this morning is any indication, the TV networks won't be setting any ratings records by broadcasting the congressional hearings on the Iran-contra affair. More than half of 25 people surveyed by the Daily News were either totally unaware of the hearings or had only a vague idea that the hearings were beginning. "I heard something about it on the radio this morning," said a middle- aged man stopped by a reporter on Market Street near 8th. "I have no comment.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Georgia Ashby, Special to The Inquirer
The time had arrived, at Tuesday night's hearing, for attorney and developer David H. Moskowitz to rebut months of testimony before the East Nantmeal Planning Commission on the negative impact his planned development, Morganshire Village, might have on groundwater, roads, safety of the residents and the Great Marsh. But instead, Moskowitz opened his presentation by introducing a hydro- geologist witness - a gambit that was met with the immediate objection of Ronald C. Nagle, attorney for the Planning Commission.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite heated community opposition, Maximo Santiago, longtime head of the city Human Relations Commission's field office in North Philadelphia, will be temporarily transferred to the commission's Center City offices Monday. Leah Gaskin White, commission executive director, met yesterday with a group of Puerto Rican community leaders opposed to the transfer. After the meeting, White said in an interview: "As far as I'm concerned, we're moving ahead to utilize the services of the North Philadelphia team.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | By Ben Wattenberg
A British journalist living in Washington and reporting on America decided he would report on America from America, rather than from Washington. His name is Andrew Manderstam of the London Broadcasting Co. His topic was the Iran- contra affair and the congressional hearings about it. Several weeks ago, Manderstam traveled to two American cities, Nashville and Detroit. He arranged meetings with small groups of Americans and, with them, watched videotapes of the hearings. He asked them what they thought about it all. Later, Manderstam made phone calls to more or less ordinary Americans in other parts of the country.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
The Birmingham supervisors set hearing dates in October for two controversial developments that would add 253 houses to the township. The supervisors also filled three vacancies on the Planning Commission, which will review the plans before the hearings. On Oct. 19 and 26, the supervisors will hear testimony on a proposal by Brandywine Development Co. for a planned residential development on the Charles Davis Farm. On Oct. 24, the board will conduct its hearing on T.J.E.M.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
Hearings on a challenge to the zoning ordinance of East Marlborough will continue Wednesday night in the township municipal building. Edward Carney and Richard Jensen, owners of a 27.7-acre site on Route 926, west of Route 82, contend that the ordinance is unconstitutional because it does not allocate enough land for commercial zoning. About 40 residents attended a hearing the supervisors held Monday night on the challenge to the ordinance. "We hope to end the hearings this month," said John Hufford, chairman of the Board of Supervisors.
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NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
BELLEFONTE, Pa. - Seeking to overturn their client's conviction, Jerry Sandusky's lawyers focused Monday on a lingering mystery from his 2012 prosecution: Who was Victim 2? Who was the boy that graduate assistant Mike McQueary said he saw Sandusky rape in 2001 in a locker-room shower - an accusation that not only helped put Sandusky away, but brought down head football coach Joe Paterno, and led to charges against former Pennsylvania State University president Graham B. Spanier and two others?
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A controversial and much-litigated natural gas pipeline project will likely face new challenges next week when the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection hosts the first of two wetlands hearings related to the proposed "Southern Reliability Link" route. New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) is seeking to build a 30-mile, 30-inch pipeline that would start in Chesterfield Township in Burlington County, pass through protected Pinelands on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, and terminate in Manchester Township in Ocean County.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
A large crowd turned out at a public hearing Wednesday night at West Chester University to support and to oppose the contentious Mariner East 2 pipeline project, which Sunoco Logistics Partners L.P. wants to build to transport liquid fuels like propane from the Marcellus Shale to a terminal in Marcus Hook.   More than 200 people attended a hearing at the Sykes Student Union organized by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. More than 40 people signed up to speak during the public comment section, with testimony evenly divided for and against the project.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
A jury of six men and six women was selected Monday to decide the fate of Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane, clearing the way for opening arguments Tuesday in Norristown. "We have our jury," Common Pleas Court Judge Wendy Demchick-Alloy announced after a nine-hour selection process. She said Kane's trial on perjury, conspiracy, obstruction, and other charges would last a week. Earlier in the day, the judge read a list of people who will either be witnesses at the trial or whose names may come up in testimony.
SPORTS
August 10, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
LOS ANGELES - Every night, Chase Utley said, he sees one or two Phillies jerseys in the stands. The native Californian plays here, so far from the first 13 years of his major-league career that made him an adopted son of Philadelphia. But the jerseys are a reminder. So is a certain phrase he uttered after a parade one October afternoon. "I hear it here at this stadium," Utley said Monday as he grabbed the top of the home dugout at Dodger Stadium, hours before he faced his old team for the first time.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON — A mother still paying off student loans for her murdered son. Another whose son declared bankruptcy after he was unable to keep up with payments. A young woman who worried she would never be able to have a child because of her six-figure debt. These were stories New Jersey lawmakers heard Monday as they took testimony on the state's Higher Education Student Assistance Authority (HESAA), which recently drew scrutiny in a ProPublica investigation. The investigation, published last month in collaboration with the New York Times , described the state's loan program as an anomaly among government lending programs for students, "with extraordinarily stringent rules that can easily lead to financial ruin.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Bill Cosby says jurors at his coming sex-assault trial in Montgomery County should not be allowed to hear a recording of a phone call he made to his accuser's mother after the alleged attack. In a suppression motion filed Wednesday, Cosby's lawyers contend that Andrea Constand's mother illegally recorded the 2005 phone call because the entertainer did not know it was being taped. His lawyers say he placed the call from his home in Cheltenham. Pennsylvania law requires consent of both parties to record a conversation.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
ISSUE | SUPREME COURT Conduct hearings Senate Republicans have refused to consider the nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to replace deceased Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia until the next president takes office ("Phila. lawyer urges hearings," Sunday). The Constitution is clear about how appointments must be made, and the rules have been followed for more than 200 years. Former federal judge Tim Lewis said he put his ideological differences aside and testified on behalf of conservative Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. because he was a "good person and a fine judge" and "it was the right thing to do. " That's what is missing in the U.S. government today: the selfless act of doing the right thing for the good of the people.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, Staff Writer
The mother of a slain Philadelphia police officer and loved ones of two other fallen officers addressed the Democratic convention Thursday, calling for unity at a time of heightened tensions between law enforcement and civilians. That tension was underscored this week by the Philadelphia police union's rebuke of the Clinton campaign for not initially scheduling speaking time for fallen officers' families - and by words heard in the Wells Fargo Center during a moment of silence just before they spoke.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, STAFF WRITER
In a highly unusual move Wednesday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed to hear on an emergency basis a lawsuit filed last week by two retired Supreme Court justices and a prominent Philadelphia lawyer challenging the wording of the ballot question on the state's judicial retirement age. The three-paragraph order gave Pedro Cortes, Pennsylvania's top election official, until next Wednesday to respond, and it promised to hear expedited arguments....
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