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Heart Attack

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NEWS
August 20, 1996 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
WCAU-TV (Channel 10) features reporter Sheela Allen-Stephens was in stable condition last night after suffering a heart attack in Atlantic City this weekend. Channel 10 news director Steve Doerr said yesterday that Allen-Stephens, 47, became ill Saturday evening while staying in an Atlantic City hotel with her husband, Channel 10 camerman Lonnie Stephens. At first, Doerr said, she thought it was indigestion, but the next morning she was admitted to Atlantic City Medical Center, where doctors diagnosed a heart attack.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Donald Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Horsham Township Council President James Doherty was home relaxing this week and looking forward to returning to work after suffering a near fatal heart attack during the Memorial Day weekend. Doherty said earlier this week that when he traveled to his summer home in the Poconos several weeks ago, he was prepared for "a weekend of relaxation. " Instead, he suffered a "massive heart attack" while sawing limbs off of a fallen tree and ended up spending two weeks in the Mount Pocono Medical Center in East Stroudsburg.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Smith Kline & French Laboratories has agreed to become the exclusive U.S. distributor of a Swedish drug that has the potential to save thousands of heart attack victims. The drug, KabiKinase, is manufactured in Sweden by KabiVitrum AB of Stockholm - one of two world producers of the drug streptokinase, said Jeremy Heymsfeld, SmithKline Beckman spokesman. KabiVitrum is the smaller of the two producers, said Alan Wachter of Smith Kline & French Labs. Terms of the accord were not released, although executives of both firms may say more when they meet with reporters this morning in New York.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 73-year-old Haycock Township man who died Wednesday after statepolice took him into custody suffered a heart attack, according to the BucksCounty Coroner's Office. State troopers at Dublin said they responded to an early morning call fromthe home of Richard L. Frick that was made to Bucks County 911 to investigatea "domestic disturbance. " Cpl. Rick Pendergrass said troopers arrived at the Camp Trail Road home at4:38 a.m. and saw Frick through his living-room window, holding a gun. He said the troopers ordered Frick out of the house and searched him forweapons outside his front door.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Fire Department lieutenant was in critical condition last night after suffering a heart attack while battling a one-alarm fire in a North Philadelphia rowhouse. Stephen Murphy, 47, of Ladder Co. 1 at 1541 Parrish St., was admitted to Allegheny University Hospitals/Hahnemann, where an emergency procedure was performed to open a clogged artery and supply blood to his heart, authorities said. Murphy fell ill while fighting the 2:46 p.m. blaze on the 1500 block of North Garnet Street.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
Stephen Naughton, the veteran Philadelphia police sergeant whose car plunged into the Schuylkill River Tuesday afternoon, died of a heart attack, the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office ruled yesterday. Naughton, 55, died of acute myocardial infarction, with a secondary cause of death listed as drowning, office spokesman Jeff Moran said. The manner of death is listed as accidental. Naughton, a married father of two and 31-year veteran of the force, had just left work at Police Headquarters at 8th and Race streets and was headed to his home in the Andorra section of northwest Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Comedian Rodney Dangerfield suffered a mild heart attack on his 80th birthday and remains hospitalized in intensive care, his publicist said yesterday. Dangerfield, whose long-running gag is that he gets no respect, had the heart attack Thursday, publicist Warren Cowan said. Dangerfield will undergo tests tomorrow, Cowan said. Doctors then will determine what treatment he requires. The comedian's wife, Joan, expects Dangerfield to be home by midweek, Cowan said. Dangerfield kept his sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rosie O'Donnell got a scary reminder of her mortality last week when she had a heart attack at home. She calls it "a miracle" that she survived. O'Donnell revealed the attack in verse form on her blog Monday: "i am happy to be alive/last week i had a heart attack. " After feeling an ache in her chest and becoming clammy, then very hot and throwing up, she decided to check her symptoms online: "i had many of them/but really? - i thought - naaaa. " Then she did something that she credits with saving her life: "i took some bayer aspirin/thank god/saved by a tv commercial/literally.
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SPORTS
August 7, 2015 | BY TOM REIFSNYDER, Daily News Staff Writer reifsnt@phillynews.com
IT MIGHT BE hard to believe, but Pete Mackanin wasn't always the mild-mannered, player-friendly manager he is today. Eight years after finishing his big-league playing career in 1981 with the Minnesota Twins, Mackanin, then 38, found himself storming back to his hotel room in a fit of rage one night after a tough loss as the manager of Aguilas del Zulia, a team in the Venezuelan Winter League. "I was just really going off and I was losing it, and my wife said to me, 'Are you going to have a heart attack over this?
SPORTS
August 7, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pete Mackanin returned to his hotel room in Maracaibo, Venezuela, in 1988. He was managing a team in the winter league and was stewing about a late-season loss. The Phillies interim manager said he "was really going off. " "Then my wife said, 'Are you going to have a heart attack over this? What are you doing?' " Mackanin said. "And it stuck with me. I said, 'You know what? I'm not going to have a heart attack over this. We're either going to win or lose. When I bring in the closer, he's either going to pitch well or he's not going to pitch well.' There's nothing else I can do about it. " Mackanin said that night changed his outlook on baseball.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By David Becker, For The Inquirer
If you have a chronic medical problem, you may be taking a prescription medication daily for the rest of your life. This can prove costly and often causes long-term adverse side effects. But did you know there are alternatives to medications? Though some people will need prescription drugs long-term, others may find that with their doctors' help they can reduce dosages or even get off one or more medications entirely by making simple lifestyle changes. Let's take a look at some of the most-prescribed medications, what they are designed to treat, and how to get started on a path for life with fewer or no medications.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, VINNY VELLA & JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writers farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A FATHER of eight who was shot by police after his car allegedly struck four cops yesterday in Olney was disoriented because he had experienced a seizure while driving, according to the man's family members and a woman who was in the car with him. Rudolph "Blue" Keitt Jr., 46, of West Oak Lane, remained in a medically induced coma last night after undergoing surgery for a gunshot wound to his chest at Einstein Medical Center, his family said....
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By David Becker, For The Inquirer
If you asked 100 random people on the street whether they would like to be in good physical shape, most would answer with a resounding "yes. " Though many people want to exercise, too many of us reason our way off the treadmill and onto the couch. Spring is here and summer is approaching, so I have compiled a list of the top 10 excuses I have heard from patients, and how to overcome them. 1. I don't have time. Planning out time to exercise at the start of the week is crucial.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GEORGE HETTENBACH had a lifelong love of automobiles, so it was considerably trying for him when he wasn't allowed to drive while recuperating from a heart attack in 2011. "Neurologically, he's fine," his wife, the former Alyson Walsh, said at the time. "I'm not dealing with any other issues, other than his complaints about my driving, which he believed could cause him to have a heart attack. " George's life was saved by a dedicated team of doctors and nurses when he suffered cardiac arrest at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in September 2011.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Martin O'Riordan's cardiology practice in Darby and Springfield, it happens weekly. A 45- or 50-year-old patient mentions that her father had a heart attack at the same age. Worried that the same fate will befall her despite being in good health, she takes baby aspirin every day. O'Riordan's typical response: Please stop. Physicians have known for decades that daily, low-dose aspirin makes sense for patients who have had a heart attack or stroke, as it sharply reduces the chance of having a second one. But for people who have never had one of these cardiovascular "events," the thinking on aspirin is less clear, despite two recent large-scale studies.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Can a modified vegan diet - heavy on tofu, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, and low on saturated and trans fats - significantly help with heart disease? It's a question that Robert Fischer, head of the division of infectious diseases at Einstein Medical Center, considered last October, after his second coronary event in 61/2 years. On the surface, Fischer, 65, of Elkins Park, appears to be an unlikely candidate for heart disease. He exhibits none of the usual risk factors.
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Army narrative describes how Jeffrey F. Zauber, a Cherry Hill native, earned a Distinguished Service Cross for "exceptionally valorous actions" in South Vietnam on Feb. 2, 1969. "While serving as company medic during a mission to relieve a sister unit engaged with an enemy force," Mr. Zauber showed "extraordinary heroism," the June 25, 1969, account reads. "Approaching the combat area, Specialist Zauber's company came under intense enemy fire and sustained several casualties.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Dr. Craig Alter, For The Inquirer
A 14-year-old girl had two light-headed spells at school and "nearly fainted. " The incident quickly brought her to the attention of the school nurse, who noted that her heart rate was high at 112 beats per minute. The girl admitted that she had sensed her heart beating quickly over the last few months. Before eighth grade, she had been an A student in honors classes. But this year her grades fell considerably, with mostly Cs. She was playing field hockey but opted to pull herself off the field because she felt short of breath.
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