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Heart Attack

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NEWS
August 20, 1996 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
WCAU-TV (Channel 10) features reporter Sheela Allen-Stephens was in stable condition last night after suffering a heart attack in Atlantic City this weekend. Channel 10 news director Steve Doerr said yesterday that Allen-Stephens, 47, became ill Saturday evening while staying in an Atlantic City hotel with her husband, Channel 10 camerman Lonnie Stephens. At first, Doerr said, she thought it was indigestion, but the next morning she was admitted to Atlantic City Medical Center, where doctors diagnosed a heart attack.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Donald Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Horsham Township Council President James Doherty was home relaxing this week and looking forward to returning to work after suffering a near fatal heart attack during the Memorial Day weekend. Doherty said earlier this week that when he traveled to his summer home in the Poconos several weeks ago, he was prepared for "a weekend of relaxation. " Instead, he suffered a "massive heart attack" while sawing limbs off of a fallen tree and ended up spending two weeks in the Mount Pocono Medical Center in East Stroudsburg.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Smith Kline & French Laboratories has agreed to become the exclusive U.S. distributor of a Swedish drug that has the potential to save thousands of heart attack victims. The drug, KabiKinase, is manufactured in Sweden by KabiVitrum AB of Stockholm - one of two world producers of the drug streptokinase, said Jeremy Heymsfeld, SmithKline Beckman spokesman. KabiVitrum is the smaller of the two producers, said Alan Wachter of Smith Kline & French Labs. Terms of the accord were not released, although executives of both firms may say more when they meet with reporters this morning in New York.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A 73-year-old Haycock Township man who died Wednesday after statepolice took him into custody suffered a heart attack, according to the BucksCounty Coroner's Office. State troopers at Dublin said they responded to an early morning call fromthe home of Richard L. Frick that was made to Bucks County 911 to investigatea "domestic disturbance. " Cpl. Rick Pendergrass said troopers arrived at the Camp Trail Road home at4:38 a.m. and saw Frick through his living-room window, holding a gun. He said the troopers ordered Frick out of the house and searched him forweapons outside his front door.
NEWS
January 28, 1998 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Fire Department lieutenant was in critical condition last night after suffering a heart attack while battling a one-alarm fire in a North Philadelphia rowhouse. Stephen Murphy, 47, of Ladder Co. 1 at 1541 Parrish St., was admitted to Allegheny University Hospitals/Hahnemann, where an emergency procedure was performed to open a clogged artery and supply blood to his heart, authorities said. Murphy fell ill while fighting the 2:46 p.m. blaze on the 1500 block of North Garnet Street.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
Stephen Naughton, the veteran Philadelphia police sergeant whose car plunged into the Schuylkill River Tuesday afternoon, died of a heart attack, the Philadelphia Medical Examiner's Office ruled yesterday. Naughton, 55, died of acute myocardial infarction, with a secondary cause of death listed as drowning, office spokesman Jeff Moran said. The manner of death is listed as accidental. Naughton, a married father of two and 31-year veteran of the force, had just left work at Police Headquarters at 8th and Race streets and was headed to his home in the Andorra section of northwest Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rosie O'Donnell got a scary reminder of her mortality last week when she had a heart attack at home. She calls it "a miracle" that she survived. O'Donnell revealed the attack in verse form on her blog Monday: "i am happy to be alive/last week i had a heart attack. " After feeling an ache in her chest and becoming clammy, then very hot and throwing up, she decided to check her symptoms online: "i had many of them/but really? - i thought - naaaa. " Then she did something that she credits with saving her life: "i took some bayer aspirin/thank god/saved by a tv commercial/literally.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Comedian Rodney Dangerfield suffered a mild heart attack on his 80th birthday and remains hospitalized in intensive care, his publicist said yesterday. Dangerfield, whose long-running gag is that he gets no respect, had the heart attack Thursday, publicist Warren Cowan said. Dangerfield will undergo tests tomorrow, Cowan said. Doctors then will determine what treatment he requires. The comedian's wife, Joan, expects Dangerfield to be home by midweek, Cowan said. Dangerfield kept his sense of humor.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 9, 2016
By George Heyrich When it comes to a heart attack, minutes matter most. With today's modern medicine, hospitals can stop a heart attack in its tracks. However, if you wait too long to seek care, your risk of permanent heart damage is higher, which could lead to heart failure or death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly 735,000 Americans experience a heart attack every year. The clock starts at the onset of the first heart-attack symptom. This is where rapid intervention saves lives.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
Q. How can I protect myself from a second heart attack? A. After you experience a heart attack, your chance of having another is higher. Most people survive their first heart attack and can return to their normal routine, but they will need to make a few changes. Depending on how badly your heart was damaged and the degree of your heart disease, your doctor will recommend specific medications and lifestyle changes that are right for you. However, it is up to you to follow those recommendations to make a full recovery.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Thomas Metkus, For The Inquirer
A woman in her early 70s received a call from her son one night to tell her his recent colonoscopy results: The screening showed he had colon cancer. Very upset over the news, she awoke that night with severe, crushing chest pain and labored breathing. She called 911 and was taken to the emergency room in the middle of the night. I was on call that night and received a call from the emergency department. I saw that her electrocardiogram and evaluation were consistent with a heart attack.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When Lynn Niblick woke in the middle of the night with chest pains, she didn't pay them much mind. But once she got to work the next day as a benefits administrator, she no longer could ignore the pain. She agreed to go to the hospital, where she discovered at 58 she was having a heart attack. "I blew off pain a lot," said Niblick, of Easthampton. "I was busy with my family and my job, and I thought if I went to the hospital they'd make me stay. "I didn't have time for it. " Niblick, 65, needed five stents inserted in her heart.
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Hooman Noorchashm, For The Inquirer
I trained to be a heart surgeon, because from the first moment in training, I saw how high-impact this specialty could be. Heart surgeons specialize in fixing broken hearts. It takes a long time and many hours of operating to learn this trade, and the learning never ends. It's a privilege with a downside: Despite our best efforts, some patients die, sometimes in terrible pain, either because their disease is too severe or they are not treated quickly enough. Most of us learn to tolerate the losses and focus on the many who make it. But we also remember the ones we lose as well as those we save.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Q: How can I stay safe while shoveling snow? A: The blizzard of 2016 behind us, take the time to ask yourself, "How can I prepare my body for the next snowstorm?" Whether you see the snow as a workout opportunity or a nuisance, you should follow several general rules to avoid a heart attack. The American Heart Association warns that the risk of a heart attack during snow shoveling may increase for some, and the combination of colder temperatures and physical exertion increases the workload on the heart.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
An 18-year-old pregnant woman died Saturday morning of a suspected heart attack after shoveling snow at her Pottstown home. Briahna Gerloff was eight months pregnant and suffered from several heart defects, according to Pottstown police. Gerloff's soon-to-be born daughter, whose name was to be Kayliana, also died. Gerloff's younger brother, Stosh, found Gerloff unresponsive in her kitchen shortly after 9 a.m. and called 911. She could not be revived. The cause of death has not been determined, police said.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Michelle Andrews, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Insurance policies that pay a lump sum if workers get cancer or another serious illness are being offered by employers in growing numbers. Companies say they want to help protect their workers against the financial pain of increasingly high deductibles and other out-of-pocket costs. But it's important to understand the limits of these plans. Critical-illness plans have been around for decades, but they have become more common lately as employers have shifted more health-care costs onto their workers' shoulders.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Once again, you've come to the right place. If you read this, you're going to LOL. But this time, I can't take the credit. Sometimes the world hands you an ace. All you have to do is set it down on the table and play. I'm talking, of course, about the SmartBra. Have you heard about this? If not, I'm here to tell you that at the recent Consumer Electronics Show, a Canadian tech company introduced a smart bra, which is a bra that is smarter than you are. Or at least smarter than your breasts.
NEWS
January 11, 2016
Otis Clay, 73, a Blues Hall of Fame singer known as much for his charitable work in Chicago as for his performances, died on Friday. The Mississippi-born singer - whose gruff, tenor on songs such as "Trying to Live My Life Without You" varied from his haunting but hopeful baritone on gospel standards such as "When the Gates Swing Open" - died suddenly of a heart attack at 6:30 p.m., said his daughter, Ronda Tankson. The one-time Grammy nominee had a year's tour planned, manager Miki Mulvehill said.
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