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Heart Attack

NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catherine McCollum Mattson, 71, of Glassboro, an English teacher for more than two decades at Overbrook High School in Pine Hill, died of a heart attack on Friday, Nov. 8, at Underwood-Memorial Hospital in Woodbury. Born in Philadelphia, she lived in Camden and Pleasantville and earned a bachelor's in 1964 and later a master's, both in English, at what is now Rowan University. Mrs. Mattson taught at Washington Township High School in Sewell before beginning her Overbrook career in the early 1970s, her husband Charlie said.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
How big is Big Data? Big enough that it may someday justify all the hype it has generated over the last few years - and big enough to have stirred a flurry of economic activity visible almost anywhere, from the lowliest start-ups to the nation's largest companies. That was the message delivered Wednesday by Jeanette Horan, IBM's chief information officer, and her smaller-company counterparts who followed her to the stage at the Software and Information Industry Association's "Data Is Destiny" conference this week at Philadelphia's Hyatt Regency Hotel.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
TOMMY "TJ" Ramos, a 9-year-old catcher on the Torresdale Boys Club baseball team, had just stepped onto the field on Leon Street near Eden for practice at about 6 p.m. Sept. 12 when he collapsed for no explicable reason. "He went down on his face. It looked like a seizure," said his mother, Micki Ramos. "I completely freaked. " But it wasn't a seizure. TJ's small, young heart was undergoing cardiac arrest. He was having a heart attack. Luckily, two off-duty Philadelphia cops - K-9 Officer John Callahan, a coach with TJ's team, and Gang Unit Officer John Pasquarello, who was watching his son practice - jumped into action while another coach called 9-1-1.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-century after a U.S. Surgeon General's report raised the alarm on tobacco, most Americans know that smoking may eventually cause lung cancer. Far less appreciated is what can happen just minutes - 60 seconds, according to some research - after taking in a breath of smoke, even secondhand. In the bloodstream, platelets are activated and become sticky. They clump together to form clots that can cause a heart attack or stroke. They stick to artery walls, ripping the lining when blood flow increases and interfering with the vessels' ability to expand and contract as needed.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you show up to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's emergency room but aren't in serious trouble, get ready to wait. New federal data show that the prestigious university hospital has the highest median ER wait times in the city at 81 minutes to see a doctor. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which publish the data from hospital submissions, say long waits can be a sign of understaffing or gridlock elsewhere in the hospital. And they can lead to lower quality care and more stressful stays for patients and families.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cooling the body is the one practice that has been shown to reduce brain injury after resuscitation for cardiac arrest. Yet "therapeutic hypothermia" is rarely used on patients who are already hospitalized when their hearts stop, according to a study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers. Disappointing as that may sound, interpreting the findings is difficult. Outside the hospital, cardiac arrest - complete stoppage of the heart, which can be fatal within minutes - is usually caused by a heart-related problem.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
TV VIEWERS may well continue to argue for decades about whether Tony Soprano is dead, but it won't feel the same, now that the man who brought him to life is gone. James Gandolfini, the burly - and surprisingly shy - actor who shot to stardom in HBO's "The Sopranos" as an up-and-coming mobster suffering a midlife crisis, died in Italy yesterday of a possible heart attack, and never wanted to see his character go that way. Killing the panic-attack-prone Tony off with a heart attack would be "kind of lame," he told reporters in 2006, back when speculation about how the show would end was all the rage.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Bob Meistrell, 84, who cofounded the Body Glove clothing company and helped develop the first neoprene wetsuit, has died in Southern California. Body Glove International president Russ Lesser told the Torrance Daily Breeze that Mr. Meistrell suffered a heart attack on his boat Sunday while returning from Catalina Island. In the 1950,s Mr. Meistrell and his identical twin, Bill, developed a wetsuit with the insulating material used in the back of refrigerators. The streamlined suit fit like a glove and eventually was marketed under the name Body Glove.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
The world's oldest Jewish person, Evelyn Kozak, whose family fled Russia to escape anti-Semitism in the 1880s, died Tuesday at 113. Mrs. Kozak had suffered a heart attack the day before, her granddaughter Brucha Weisberger said. She was buried next to her parents in a Brooklyn cemetery. Mrs. Kozak was the world's oldest documented Jewish person and the world's seventh-oldest person, said Robert Young, a senior database administrator at the Los Angeles-based Gerontology Research Group, an organization of physicians, scientists, and engineers who validate supercentenarians, people 110 or older.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Is there a doctor on board? Surprisingly often, there is - in half of in-flight medical emergencies - and sick airline passengers almost always survive, a new study finds. The research is the largest look yet at what happens to people who develop a medical problem on a commercial flight - 44,000 of the 2.75 billion passengers worldwide each year, researchers estimate. Most cases do not require diverting a plane as the study's leader, Christian Martin-Gill, advised a pilot to do two years.
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