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Heart Disease

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NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Be happy - it seems to be good for your heart. Scientists have long known that Type A personalities and people who are chronically angry, anxious, or depressed have a higher risk of heart attacks. Now a Harvard review of the flip side of that psychology concludes that being upbeat and optimistic just might help protect against heart disease. Rather than focusing only on how to lessen heart risks, "it might also be useful to focus on how we might bolster the positive side of things," said lead researcher Julia Boehm of the Harvard School of Public Health.
SPORTS
September 7, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
San Francisco 49ers offensive lineman Thomas Herrion had heart disease and evidence of previous heart trouble when he collapsed and died after a preseason game last month in Denver, an official in county coroner's office said yesterday. The coroner's findings confirmed the beliefs of Herrion's family and friends, who were certain drugs played no role in Herrion's death Aug. 20. Herrion's heart condition was caused by factors that are often nearly undetectable, though fairly rare in a 23-year-old athlete in good physical condition.
LIVING
April 1, 1996 | This report was compiled from Inquirer wire services
More than 30,000 cardiologists from around the world met in Orlando, Fla., last week to hear the latest research on heart disease. New findings on vitamin E, cholesterol and heart disease among African Americans were part of the research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 45th annual conference. The new cholesterol study - of people who've already had heart attacks - found that cholesterol-lowering drugs can cut their risk of another heart attack - or death - significantly.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
An elderly woman who was found dead inside her burning South Philadelphia home Monday afternoon had died of heart disease before the fire occurred, the Medical Examiner's Office said Wednesday. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Medical Examiner, identified the woman as Dorothy Powell, 84. Firefighters encountered heavy fire on the first floor of the home on the 2100 block of Pierce Street in Point Breeze, Executive Chief Richard Davison said. He said firefighters found Powell dead inside the home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Sue Ann Rybak INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's time to pump it up - your bicycle, that is. Sunday morning, you can hit the road for the fifth annual Girls with Gears: A Women's Cycling Event, to be held at Limerick Community Park. The event is sponsored by Bikesport in Trappe and CAROL for Heart Inc. CAROL, a nonprofit, aims to "eradicate women's heart disease through increased awareness and education. " "Almost every minute, a woman in the U.S. dies of heart disease. Nearly five times as many women (200,000)
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Silent, symptomless heart disease is more dangerous and far more likely to result in a heart attack than the kind accompanied by warning chest pains, researchers reported yesterday. The finding, from one of the first long-term studies of silent ischemia, highlights the need for people at high risk of heart disease to undergo diagnostic tests, said Dr. Gordon Walters of the Medical University of South Carolina. "The people we're talking about here classically are middle-aged men who smoke, have a family history (of heart disease)
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
High-strung, ambitious men with Type A personalities are almost twice as likely as less aggressive men to survive heart disease, according to a study released yesterday that challenges the advice that heart-attack victims should slow down and relax. The surprising findings also cast new doubt on the theory that Type A behavior puts people at higher risk of getting heart disease in the first place. That idea has already been questioned by several other researchers in recent years.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Baby Cecilia, abandoned at birth 28 months ago with cocaine in her system, a lung disease and three heart defects, died over the weekend from severe congenital heart disease in a Boston hospital, hospital officials said. The baby, christened Cecilia by Lucinda Brzozowski, the pediatric care nurse who quit her job earlier this year to be the baby's foster mother, had been flown to Boston Children's Hospital last week from Philadelphia. The Boston hospital was the only hospital in the region that could perform complicated procedures to fix two of the baby's heart defects, but Cecilia had not received the surgery before she died Saturday, according to Laura Humphrey, a hospital spokeswoman.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cardiologists are riding the crest of a wave of recent discoveries that promise to prevent heart attacks and sudden death, help hearts that are already damaged and sharply reduce the death rate from the nation's number-one killer like never before. Every week seems to bring news of yet another advance or improvement in an existing technique or promising results from long-term studies showing that a particular drug or procedure is producing long-term, beneficial results. In only 15 years (from 1972 to last year)
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | Tom Avril
Please floss and brush, by all means. It's still good for your teeth and gums. But don't imagine that you're going to ward off heart disease in the process. That's the message of a new "scientific statement" from an expert committee of the American Heart Association, which analyzed more than 500 papers and articles on the topic. The idea that periodontal disease might impair the cardiovascular system dates back more than a century, according to the statement, published in the journal Circulation, and the hypothesis had a resurgence beginning about 20 years ago. Indeed, people with bad gums are more likely to have strokes, heart attacks, and hardening of the arteries.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016
Stanley K. Sheinbaum, 96, a former economics professor whose drive for Mideast peace had him mingling with presidents, royalty, and movie stars, died of heart disease Monday at his Los Angeles home. Dr. Sheinbaum gave up teaching to devote himself to what he called his quest to "create a little peace and justice in this unjust world. " He raised funds to defend Daniel Ellsberg during the military analyst's trial for releasing the Pentagon Papers, a secret study of the Vietnam War. Never one to shrink from controversy, Dr. Sheinbaum met with then-Palestinian Authority President Yasir Arafat in an unofficial diplomatic mission to bring peace to the Middle East.
NEWS
July 3, 2016
The patient's doctor referred him to a cardiologist, because of his multiple cardiac risk factors. His initial exam in my office was unremarkable. His EKG was abnormal, but consistent with his history of high blood pressure. His aortic calcifications, noted on the CAT scan, raised a flag because calcium in blood vessels can suggest atherosclerotic disease. I asked him to have a nuclear stress test, which involves receiving a small amount of a radioactive material that can help detect coronary blockages.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Juliet Sims, Jessica Berthold, and Sarah Mittermaier
Philadelphia scored a major victory for public health last week by becoming the first large U.S. city to pass a tax on sugary drinks. Only the small city of Berkeley, Calif., has managed to do likewise; Philly's tax is heftier and will affect far more people. What's more, the fact that this measure passed in a city where it failed twice before, and in the face of strong opposition from the beverage industry, will inspire and embolden cities like San Francisco, Boulder, Colo., and Oakland, Calif., where voters will decide on sugary-drink taxes this fall.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
Q. How can I protect myself from a second heart attack? A. After you experience a heart attack, your chance of having another is higher. Most people survive their first heart attack and can return to their normal routine, but they will need to make a few changes. Depending on how badly your heart was damaged and the degree of your heart disease, your doctor will recommend specific medications and lifestyle changes that are right for you. However, it is up to you to follow those recommendations to make a full recovery.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A woman whose body was found on a Society Hill street on May 7 died of natural causes, the Medical Examiner's Office said Tuesday. Lorraine Grant, 58, suffered from heart disease, Jeff Moran, the office's spokesman, said. She was found unresponsive on South Fifth Street near Lombard about 10:35 a.m. Saturday, May 7, and was pronounced dead 10 minutes later by medics at the scene, police have said. shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592 @julieshawphilly  
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have been in a serious relationship with my boyfriend for two years. He shared with me that he was sexually abused by a cousin for years as a child. He told me he has never disclosed it to anyone but me. My boyfriend says he has come to terms with the abuse and his abuser, but I'm not sure it's true. He became really upset when he spoke about it the one time, and we haven't discussed it since. I'm afraid to pry, but I think he may need help. His abuser is still present in his life.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
A daily dose of aspirin can help prevent both heart disease and colorectal cancer in adults age 50 to 69 who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular problems, an independent panel of medical experts said Monday. The final recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said that low-dose aspirin - typically, 81 mg - is most beneficial for people age 50 to 59. For adults 60 to 69, a decision should be made with their doctors because aspirin can increase the risk of bleeding, the panel said.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Ever since a landmark federal clinical trial gave menopausal hormone therapy a black eye almost a generation ago, critics have argued that the results overstated the cardiac dangers for newly postmenopausal women. Now, a new trial suggests that women who start taking hormones within six years of menopause can slow age-related thickening of their heart arteries, an indicator of heart disease. The therapy had no effect on two other indicators of heart disease, and the trial was not large or long enough to see whether estrogen and progesterone actually reduced heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Evidence has been mounting for a few years that raising "good" cholesterol levels is not necessarily helpful in preventing heart disease. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers explains a piece of that complicated puzzle, at least for people with a particular genetic quirk. Good cholesterol is called that because it is a measurement of how much of the waxy, artery-clogging stuff is being shuttled to the liver for disposal, carried by high-density lipoprotein (HDL)
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