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Heart Disease

LIVING
February 15, 1999 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Do you think you can tell the difference between whole milk and a slimmed-down version - blindfolded? Folks in Harrisburg bet you can't. They also think there's a good chance you won't like fattier milk once you have sipped the no-fat or low-fat alternative. Such taste testing is part of the Pennsylvania Department of Health's new initiative to cut the risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks and strokes. The aim is to get people to switch from whole milk as a way to reduce their consumption of saturated fat - a major contributor to heart disease.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Nearly a third of Americans experience long-lasting pain - the kind that lingers for weeks to months - and too often feel stigma rather than relief from a health-care system poorly prepared to treat them, the Institute of Medicine said Wednesday. The staggering tab: Chronic pain is costing the nation at least $558 billion a year in medical bills, sick days, and lost productivity, the report found. That's more than the cost of heart disease, the No. 1 killer. All kinds of ailments can trigger lingering pain, from arthritis to cancer, spine problems to digestive disorders, injuries to surgery.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
In an effort to head off artery disease before it gets started, the American Heart Association (AHA) recommended yesterday that parents limit the fat intake of children over age 2 and encourage them to exercise regularly. "All we're advising is that children begin now living a healthy lifestyle," said Dr. William Weidman, head of the AHA panel that drew up new guidelines released during the association's annual scientific meeting here. The policy statement aimed at preventing, or at least slowing, development of the artery-clogging disease called atherosclerosis highlights a gradual shift in the medical community away from a more lenient approach to early childhood.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: My triglyceride level was 419 and my doctor recommended that I take the drug Tricor to lower it. Since I feel fine, do I need to take it? Why is an elevated triglyceride level bad? What raises the triglycerides? Answer: Triglycerides are a part of the total cholesterol in your blood. For years, we weren't quite sure whether or not treating triglycerides made a difference in preventing heart disease. High levels over 400 usually got treated, while numbers between 200 and 400 were treated at the doctor's discretion.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women could substantially cut their risk of heart disease by consuming about twice as much folic acid and Vitamin B6 as is currently recommended, a new study suggests. Harvard University researchers tracked 80,000 healthy nurses for 14 years and found that those who consumed at least 400 micrograms of folic acid and 3 milligrams of Vitamin B6 each day from food or vitamin supplements cut their risk of heart disease in half compared with women with the lowest intakes. The current Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Ken Dilanian, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Stephanie Knoll, 6, had a particularly good reason to be dancing. "I had heart disease myself when I was little," she said, without hesitation. "And I feel I should do something for people who are like me. " Stephanie, of Lower Gwynedd, was born with a defect that required her to have open-heart surgery at the age of six months, said her mother, Mary Knoll. Stephanie is scheduled to take one last test next month to make sure she is fully recovered. On Saturday, she joined 185 other youths, ages 3 to 18, in a dance-athon for the American Heart Association held Saturday at Jane Lopoten's School of Dance in Lansdale.
NEWS
September 29, 1994 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They'll be walking this weekend, thousands of volunteers who hope to speed the progress Americans have made against two deadly diseases: heart disease and diabetes. A diabetic, Mary Jo Garner, will lead a 50-member team from the Newtown Fitness and Racquet Club along an eight-mile course through Tyler State Park on Sunday. About 2,000 people in four Philadelphia-area parks will join them in the fourth annual Walktoberfest to aid the American Diabetes Association. In neighboring Core Creek Park, hundreds will trek five miles Saturday in the third annual American Heart Walk benefiting the American Heart Association.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Watching your weight? Hoping for better heart health? Trying to prevent type 2 diabetes? Nuts to all that! It turns out that nuts appear to bestow a wide variety of health benefits, from helping clear out bad cholesterol to cutting down on visceral fat to reducing the risk of dying from heart disease or cancer. The benefits of consuming nuts were emphasized late last year in a large study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Findings revealed that participants in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who ate a fistful of nuts daily were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than those who did not consume nuts.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
One thing Chicken Little apparently didn't need to worry about was that he'd suffer a heart attack or stroke. New work out of the University of Pennsylvania shows that chickens and other birds do not share our vulnerability to heart disease. For humans, those diseases look like the price we pay to get a blood-clotting system that keeps us from bleeding to death every time we fumble with the kitchen knife. Chickens avoided this evolutionary trade-off by using a different blood-clotting system.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | By JOHN SUTHERLAND
Cornering the market on misguided rage these days is the radical AIDS activist group Act Up, which has been holding demonstrations all over the country. Eight people were arrested in a clash with Philadelphia police last month during an Act Up protest staged around a visit by President Bush. When the group is practicing its particular brand of civil unrest, it has all the charm and educational benefit of a car wreck - people stop to look, are appalled and go away having learned nothing.
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