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Heart Disease

NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Since the 1960s, the number of people dying from heart disease has fallen steadily in the United States. But heart disease is still responsible for a quarter of all deaths, and remains the leading cause of mortality for both men and women. Innovations in care and more insight into risk factors has helped lessen its damaging impact. One insight is that many people can control their risk. Most heart disease is preventable, but "we don't pay attention to that disease process" until it's too advanced, said Daniel Edmundowicz, medical director of the Temple Heart and Vascular Institute in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr. and Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer Staff Writer Peter Nicholas contributed to this article
State Rep. David P. Richardson Jr. - a relentless advocate for African Americans, the impoverished and the disenfranchised - died suddenly yesterday of a heart attack. He was 47 and had a history of heart disease and diabetes. From the time he was a teenager - when he fought to make African American history part of the public school curriculum - through more than 20 years in the House of Representatives, Richardson threw his heft and his voice into causes he saw as just. In his own neighborhood of Germantown, he had a reputation as the community's moral compass, said U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah.
SPORTS
September 17, 2008 | by Paul Vigna
A chronological list of the former Steelers who have died since 2000 under age 60. Steve Furness: Feb. 9, 2000, 49, heart attack. Tyrone McGriff: Dec. 9, 2000, 42, heart attack. Joe Gilliam: Dec. 25, 2000, 49, heart attack. Mike Webster: Sept. 24, 2002, 50, heart attack. Ron Shanklin: April 17, 2003, 55, cancer. Fred Small: June 24, 2003, 39, his motorcycle collided with two cars on the Pomona (Calif.) Freeway. James Parrish: March 10, 2004, 35, cancer.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Smoking causes about half of all heart attacks among young and middle-aged women, and even three or four cigarettes a day sharply increase the risk, researchers conclude in a newly published study. In a separate study, a scientist reported that living in a home where one or both parents smoke may accelerate the development of hardening of the arteries in young boys and raise their risk of coronary heart disease as adults. The results of both studies should provide more incentive for smokers to quit, researchers said.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | Daily News staff report
Three city residents died yesterday as the result of the heat wave, according to the Philadelphia medical examiner's office. The three were: Robert Chandler, 71, of 76th Avenue near Ogontz; Dorothea Gledhill, 66, of Wagner Avenue near 10th Street, who also suffered from heart disease and cancer; and Elda diMaria, 79, of 16th Street near Reed, who suffered from heart disease. These deaths bring the total heat-related deaths this week to four and the total for the summer so far to nine, according to Health Department spokesman Jeff Moran.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
On the eve of today's Great American Smokeout, two studies released yesterday reported that smoking and exposure to cigarette smoke increases the danger of heart attacks and heart disease among women and boys. According to the Nurses Health Study, smoking causes about half of all heart attacks among young and middle-aged women, and even three or four cigarettes a day sharply increase the risk. Until a few years ago, many experts believed that cigarettes did not contribute to heart disease in women.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another medical guideline. Another controversy. This time, a group of experts wants to redefine high blood pressure - it's now OK for some of us to be a little higher, they say - and other doctors are resisting the change. Raymond Townsend, a kidney specialist at the University of Pennsylvania who helped write the new guidelines, said the group's work is based on the best available evidence from high-quality clinical trials. Published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blood-pressure-lowering drugs known as ACE inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment for many diseases. But with growing use of these heart-helping medications, more and more patients are winding up in emergency rooms with a rare side effect that most have not been warned about: swelling around the face and neck. In the worst cases, the patient's tongue and throat become hugely bloated, closing the airway. No medications can slow or reverse this swelling, called angioedema.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Every morning, I take a One-a-Day women's multivitamin. The label advertises how the pill is "formulated to support" everything from bone strength to heart health. Taking the pill always makes me feel proactive about my health. I never doubted the common view that "vitamins are good for you. " In Do You Believe in Magic?: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine , Paul A. Offit, chief of the division of infectious diseases at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, delivers an epic critique of vitamins, the supplement industry, and our vulnerability to quackery.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Breast cancer. That we know about. From the pink ribbons pinned on jacket lapels to the graphic photographs of defiant, one-breasted women to the next-door neighbor who's wearing a bandanna on her balding head, we are all too familiar with the ravages of this killer of women. But as much as we know about breast cancer, that's how little we know about heart disease, the No. 1 killer of American women: We aren't aware that one in nine women ages 45 to 64 have some form of heart disease.
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