CollectionsHeart Disease
IN THE NEWS

Heart Disease

NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Yourshaw was 93 and in hospice care at his home in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, in February when he asked his visiting daughter for his bottle of morphine. That much appears undisputed. Now, Barbara Mancini of Philadelphia is facing prosecution for allegedly aiding her father's suicide - an allegation she denied through her lawyers. "Prosecution of Mancini is an assault on a loving daughter and a violation of a dying patient's constitutional right to pain relief," said Kathryn Tucker, a lawyer with Denver-based Compassion and Choices, an end-of-life advocacy group that is helping Mancini.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc Winans had a right to feel uneasy. His maternal grandfather died of a heart attack at 55. His mother's brother made it to 57 before meeting the same fate. Several cousins on his mother's side also had heart disease - including a second cousin who died at 40. Yet Winans did not have especially high cholesterol levels, and at 38, the Jeffersonville resident was a nonsmoker and in good physical shape. Should he take statins as a precaution? The answer, he hoped, lay in a big white doughnut at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Battling the flames and billowing black smoke, Deborah Feairheller fought her way into the Caln Township home. As a metal air pack pumped oxygen into her mask, she yanked down the ceiling with a long pole to ventilate the attic above. Understandably, she feared for her safety, if not her life. " 'Is the floor going to hold me up?' " Feairheller said she thinks each time she enters a fire. " 'Is the ceiling going to fall on top of me?' " Yet Feairheller knew, better than most, that the top cause of fatalities among firefighters is not collapsing walls, or ceilings, or floors - or smoke inhalation.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medical guidelines are meant to unify doctors and standardize care for patients around treatments supported by the best available science. But the latest guidelines on the use of statins, a class of drugs used to reduce cholesterol, are already generating significant pushback from doctors. The controversy is likely to confuse patients. The new rules released this week by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology would expand the number of people getting statins to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, or stroke while eliminating specific numeric goals for LDL, or bad cholesterol.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blood-pressure-lowering drugs known as ACE inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment for many diseases. But with growing use of these heart-helping medications, more and more patients are winding up in emergency rooms with a rare side effect that most have not been warned about: swelling around the face and neck. In the worst cases, the patient's tongue and throat become hugely bloated, closing the airway. No medications can slow or reverse this swelling, called angioedema.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years of telling people that a daily glass of wine or beer could lower the risk of heart disease, earlier this month came new research that said exactly the opposite. What should people believe? Such course corrections are part of science, as researchers reexamine assumptions, refine methods, and perform new experiments. Scientists caution that the results of any one study should be viewed in the context of the larger body of work. Physicians must give patients the best available information at the time.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Smoking causes about half of all heart attacks among young and middle-aged women, and even three or four cigarettes a day sharply increase the risk, researchers conclude in a newly published study. In a separate study, a scientist reported that living in a home where one or both parents smoke may accelerate the development of hardening of the arteries in young boys and raise their risk of coronary heart disease as adults. The results of both studies should provide more incentive for smokers to quit, researchers said.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | Daily News staff report
Three city residents died yesterday as the result of the heat wave, according to the Philadelphia medical examiner's office. The three were: Robert Chandler, 71, of 76th Avenue near Ogontz; Dorothea Gledhill, 66, of Wagner Avenue near 10th Street, who also suffered from heart disease and cancer; and Elda diMaria, 79, of 16th Street near Reed, who suffered from heart disease. These deaths bring the total heat-related deaths this week to four and the total for the summer so far to nine, according to Health Department spokesman Jeff Moran.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
On the eve of today's Great American Smokeout, two studies released yesterday reported that smoking and exposure to cigarette smoke increases the danger of heart attacks and heart disease among women and boys. According to the Nurses Health Study, smoking causes about half of all heart attacks among young and middle-aged women, and even three or four cigarettes a day sharply increase the risk. Until a few years ago, many experts believed that cigarettes did not contribute to heart disease in women.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Breast cancer. That we know about. From the pink ribbons pinned on jacket lapels to the graphic photographs of defiant, one-breasted women to the next-door neighbor who's wearing a bandanna on her balding head, we are all too familiar with the ravages of this killer of women. But as much as we know about breast cancer, that's how little we know about heart disease, the No. 1 killer of American women: We aren't aware that one in nine women ages 45 to 64 have some form of heart disease.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|