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Heart Disease

NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scenes are too common for comfort: A mother grabs her daughter's arm roughly on the bus. A father at a Wawa growls coarsely into his son's ear. Not legally defined as child abuse, it's known as harsh or authoritarian parenting. Regardless of race or income level, mothers and fathers everywhere are capable of it. But low-income parents who struggle with stresses from overwhelming issues such as hunger, or lack of a job or adequate housing, seem to engage in harsh parenting more often, researchers have concluded.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blood-pressure-lowering drugs known as ACE inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment for many diseases. But with growing use of these heart-helping medications, more and more patients are winding up in emergency rooms with a rare side effect that most have not been warned about: swelling around the face and neck. In the worst cases, the patient's tongue and throat become hugely bloated, closing the airway. No medications can slow or reverse this swelling, called angioedema.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr. and Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer Staff Writer Peter Nicholas contributed to this article
State Rep. David P. Richardson Jr. - a relentless advocate for African Americans, the impoverished and the disenfranchised - died suddenly yesterday of a heart attack. He was 47 and had a history of heart disease and diabetes. From the time he was a teenager - when he fought to make African American history part of the public school curriculum - through more than 20 years in the House of Representatives, Richardson threw his heft and his voice into causes he saw as just. In his own neighborhood of Germantown, he had a reputation as the community's moral compass, said U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Smoking causes about half of all heart attacks among young and middle-aged women, and even three or four cigarettes a day sharply increase the risk, researchers conclude in a newly published study. In a separate study, a scientist reported that living in a home where one or both parents smoke may accelerate the development of hardening of the arteries in young boys and raise their risk of coronary heart disease as adults. The results of both studies should provide more incentive for smokers to quit, researchers said.
NEWS
August 10, 2001 | Daily News staff report
Three city residents died yesterday as the result of the heat wave, according to the Philadelphia medical examiner's office. The three were: Robert Chandler, 71, of 76th Avenue near Ogontz; Dorothea Gledhill, 66, of Wagner Avenue near 10th Street, who also suffered from heart disease and cancer; and Elda diMaria, 79, of 16th Street near Reed, who suffered from heart disease. These deaths bring the total heat-related deaths this week to four and the total for the summer so far to nine, according to Health Department spokesman Jeff Moran.
NEWS
November 19, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
On the eve of today's Great American Smokeout, two studies released yesterday reported that smoking and exposure to cigarette smoke increases the danger of heart attacks and heart disease among women and boys. According to the Nurses Health Study, smoking causes about half of all heart attacks among young and middle-aged women, and even three or four cigarettes a day sharply increase the risk. Until a few years ago, many experts believed that cigarettes did not contribute to heart disease in women.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two federally funded clinical studies have dashed hopes that cholesterol-fighting statin drugs could relieve severe or life-threatening breathing problems. Past studies suggested patients with lung damage who were taking statins had better outcomes than patients who were not, presumably because statins can reduce inflammation and block cholesterol production. But one of the trials, designed and led by Temple University researcher Gerard J. Criner, found that simvastatin (brand name Zocor)
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Breast cancer. That we know about. From the pink ribbons pinned on jacket lapels to the graphic photographs of defiant, one-breasted women to the next-door neighbor who's wearing a bandanna on her balding head, we are all too familiar with the ravages of this killer of women. But as much as we know about breast cancer, that's how little we know about heart disease, the No. 1 killer of American women: We aren't aware that one in nine women ages 45 to 64 have some form of heart disease.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
A woman found dead inside her burning South Philadelphia home Monday afternoon died of heart disease before the fire occurred, the Medical Examiner's Office said Wednesday. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the medical examiner, identified the woman as Dorothy Powell, 84, of the 2100 block of Pierce Street in Point Breeze. - Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Study: Hostility can predict heart disease A personality test may do a better job than standard examinations in predicting a man's heart disease risk, researchers said yesterday after finding a close link between hostility and heart symptoms. Men who suffered heart attacks, chest pain or other incidents of heart disease were much more likely to have scored high in hostility on a personality exam, the team at Brown University, Harvard Medical School, Boston University, the Veterans Administration and elsewhere found.
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