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Heart Rate

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NEWS
April 26, 2010 | By Alex Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
My patient needed to be delivered. She had just developed eclampsia, a potentially fatal disease that afflicts women in the second half of pregnancy. She had suffered a seizure and dangerously high blood pressure, and was at risk for far worse, including a stroke. No one knows why this condition arises, but delivery sure clears it up in a hurry. So we gave medication to start labor, and the nurses placed a fetal heart monitor. Worn like a belt, but higher on the abdomen, the ultrasound monitor would play a crucial role in the hours to come.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | By Judi Sheppard Missett, Special to The Inquirer
A good way to maintain a healthy lifestyle is to combine proper nutrition with regular aerobic exercise three to five times each week. A majority of Americans do one or the other, but not both. Aerobic exercise is any activity that uses the major muscles (quadriceps, hamstrings, deltoids) and is sustained continually for at least 20 minutes. To enhance the cardiorespiratory system, the activity should raise your heart rate to a "training level" of 60 to 90 percent of your maximum heart rate.
SPORTS
September 26, 2011 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flyers winger Scott Hartnell had an elevated heart rate during the team's last exhibition game and will see a cardiologist Tuesday, general manager Paul Holmgren said after Sunday's practice in Voorhees. Hartnell's heart rate has since gone down, Holmgren said, but the Flyers do not want to take any chances, and the 29-year-old forward will sit out Monday's exhibition against the visiting New York Rangers as a precaution. In Friday's 3-1 win in Detroit, Hartnell picked up an assist, but he did not play in the third period because of an elevated heart rate between the second and third periods, Holmgren said.
SPORTS
August 10, 1993 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A mixture of an over-the-counter decongestant and cold water may have triggered the irregular heartbeat that forced New York Giants lineman William Roberts to leave an exhibition game Saturday, his doctor said yesterday. Jeffrey Borer said he did not consider Roberts' condition life-threatening, adding that it is not uncommon for people with irregular heartbeats to have such episodes occasionally. Roberts had to leave Saturday's exhibition game in Cincinnati in the third quarter when his heartbeat increased rapidly, the third time in two years that he has experienced the problem.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberals may carp that the President has a hard heart. But no one can quibble with its efficiency. The thing's a Swiss clock, a slow-tocking metronome, a humming Texas motor that could very well rank George W. Bush among the world's fittest people - in comparable shape to most professional basketball players, college football players, and major-league baseball players. That's the interpretation of some fitness experts who were wowed by one startling piece of data released by the White House after Bush's medical checkup Saturday: The man's resting heart rate is 43 beats per minute.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former Philadelphia Mayor W. Wilson Goode was resting comfortably last night at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania after being admitted to the emergency room early yesterday with a rapid heart rate. Hospital officials emphasized that he had not suffered a heart attack. His physician, Harold L. Mignott, said Goode would most likely be discharged this morning. Goode, 57, was taken to the hospital by ambulance about 2 a.m. from his home on 59th Street near City Avenue, in the Overbrook Farms section of the city.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Auggie, a 11/2-year-old male Jack Russell terrier, presented to our clinic with muscle tremors. The owners first noticed the tremors the previous evening, when the dog appeared to have tripped on the stairs. Fine muscle tremors, primarily in the buttocks, were apparent on physical exam. The neutered dog showed no pain upon palpation of his spine and manipulation of his neck and limbs but seemed somewhat stiff. He was well hydrated and pulse was normal. "This is the calmest Jack Russell I've ever seen," I said several times, perhaps ominously.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Chronic constipation, heart disease and death Q: I had always believed that Elvis Presley died at 42 from a heart attack. However, I've recently read that his longtime physician George Nichopoulos believes Elvis died from chronic constipation. How does someone die from that? A: According to the autopsy report, hypertensive cardiovascular disease and a "colon problem" were the likely contributing factors to his premature death from a heart attack. It has been reported by his now-retired personal physician that Elvis suffered for years from chronic constipation and that his colon was markedly distended at autopsy.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER A Chester County Court jury has awarded $32.8 million to a 4-year-old girl, concluding that she suffered brain damage at birth because nurses at Phoenixville Hospital failed to alert doctors about changes in her condition. After a two-week trial, the jury on Friday found two nurses were negligent when they waited 13 minutes to tell doctors that Lilly Ciechoski's heart rate had dropped, the family's lawyer said. The same jury found that a third nurse and the hospital were not to blame for the girl's injuries.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Some people's hearts are shrunk in them, like dried nuts. You can hear 'em rattle as they walk. - Douglas Jerrold 19th-century English humorist The heart, that perpetually pulsating little music box, has symbolized many things throughout the ages. Recently, because heart disease has become so prevalent in this country, a hearty heart also has come to represent a healthy body. Today, the heart also is used as a measurement by those who want to pinpoint the exact degree of their fitness.
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NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Dr. Craig Alter, For The Inquirer
A 14-year-old girl had two light-headed spells at school and "nearly fainted. " The incident quickly brought her to the attention of the school nurse, who noted that her heart rate was high at 112 beats per minute. The girl admitted that she had sensed her heart beating quickly over the last few months. Before eighth grade, she had been an A student in honors classes. But this year her grades fell considerably, with mostly Cs. She was playing field hockey but opted to pull herself off the field because she felt short of breath.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Heart failure is characterized by a heart muscle that is weak, stretched out, and flabby, and therefore unable to pump enough blood. Patients with advanced disease have trouble walking more than a few steps without gasping for breath. A new cuff-like device is designed to help patients by doing some of the pumping for them. The cuff is wrapped around the ascending aorta, and it contains a plastic balloon that squeezes in time with the patient's heartbeat, apparently providing relief to some patients in a small study published this month.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware hospital system cut the use of heart-monitoring technology by 70 percent without compromising patient safety by changing the electronic ordering system to reflect cardiac-care guidelines. The study by the Christiana Care Health System in Wilmington, published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, safely reduced the daily number of patients monitored with cardiac telemetry from 357 to 109, a hefty saving of $13,200 a day. "It is remarkable to achieve such a substantial reduction in the use of this resource without significantly increased adverse outcomes," University of California-San Francisco physician Nader Najafi wrote in an accompanying commentary.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER A Chester County Court jury has awarded $32.8 million to a 4-year-old girl, concluding that she suffered brain damage at birth because nurses at Phoenixville Hospital failed to alert doctors about changes in her condition. After a two-week trial, the jury on Friday found two nurses were negligent when they waited 13 minutes to tell doctors that Lilly Ciechoski's heart rate had dropped, the family's lawyer said. The same jury found that a third nurse and the hospital were not to blame for the girl's injuries.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Goldstein has always been freaked out by needles and blood. When he was about five, his mother, physician Susan Wiegers, had a small biopsy done. Goldstein and his brother asked to see the wound. "It was a tiny line with two stitches," she recalled. Goldstein's brother was fascinated. But Goldstein turned away. "I don't feel so good," he said. Then he keeled over. Since then, Goldstein has passed out, or come close to it, every time he has had a close encounter with a syringe or an intravenous line.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Miniature toy drones that can fly and crawl across the ceiling but steer clear of stratospheric prices. Wearable fitness sensors that can track your steps, stairs, calorie use, even your heart rate and sleep patterns. Three-dimensional printers for under $1,000 that can bring your creation to life. Every January during the Consumer Electronics Show, Sin City briefly turns into a technologist's imaginarium - a place to show off innovations, make connections, and catch a glimpse of everybody else's dreams.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Auggie, a 11/2-year-old male Jack Russell terrier, presented to our clinic with muscle tremors. The owners first noticed the tremors the previous evening, when the dog appeared to have tripped on the stairs. Fine muscle tremors, primarily in the buttocks, were apparent on physical exam. The neutered dog showed no pain upon palpation of his spine and manipulation of his neck and limbs but seemed somewhat stiff. He was well hydrated and pulse was normal. "This is the calmest Jack Russell I've ever seen," I said several times, perhaps ominously.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
1Google Glass Now in beta-test mode, this geeky blend of eye glasses and "heads up" monitor/camera/computer could be the biggest thing in wearable tech since the Walkman. 2Recon Jet From the pioneer in sports-minded heads-up displays, these new, high-tech sunglasses ($499) wirelessly connect to third-party devices to show critical info, including heart rate, cadence and power output. With built-in HD camera! 3iWatch Apple's recent poaching of talent and the spotting of execs wearing sports/activity sensors (FuelBand, Jawbone Up)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013
A step stool can add value to your workout. The good news: you probably already own one. If you don't, they are inexpensive and easy to find at supermarkets, hardware stores and even pharmacies. The simple step-up, step-down movement is just what you need to up the intensity of your cardiovascular workout. Do this for 5 minutes and your heart rate will soar. It's all good, whether your workout is 5 minutes or 55. Once you feel comfortable with the basic move, you can graduate to more complex ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Anna Nguyen, For The Inquirer
Nina Kash is living a life that wasn't possible 40 years ago. The 18-year-old from Malvern was born with a single ventricle heart defect, once a fatal condition. Only one of her heart's two biggest chambers was strong enough to pump effectively. Despite that, Kash is an enthusiastic freshman studying education at Penn State Brandywine. She drives her own car, works at Target during school breaks, volunteers at the Malvern Public Library, and shows a passion for shopping that cannot be denied.
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