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Heart Rate

SPORTS
December 9, 2012
Running seems like a simple sport: Throw on some sneakers, a T-shirt, and shorts, and go. But if you're a runner or have a runner on your holiday shopping list, you know it can be a lot more complicated than that. So I asked local running stores what's been flying out of their doors since Black Friday to give you ideas if you have an athlete on your shopping list. Let's start with a big one: a GPS running watch. Not only does this act as a stopwatch, but it will also let you know instantly how far you've run, how fast you're going, and, depending on how many bells and whistles you require (and bucks you want to spend)
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | by Monica Lewis, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode was listed in satisfactory condition yesterday following what doctors classified as a simple case of an "irregular heartbeat. " "At this point, his heart rate is normal and he is resting in stable condition," said Dr. Harold Mignott, a faculty member at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During a news briefing yesterday at the hospital's Ravden Institute, Mignott, a physician in HUP's general internal medicine division, said a combination of heat and strenuous activities may have caused Goode to suffer from an atria arrhythmia, a condition that causes the top of the heart to beat rapidly.
NEWS
November 6, 1995 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
A shopping mall should be gauged the same way as an aerobic workout: by measuring the target heart rate. A shopper reaches the optimum cardiac level upon discovery of a fabulous store, passing a particularly alluring window display or spotting a wicked sale. At the universe's best mall - shoppers' heaven - the target rate is maintained throughout the entire experience, and the shopper never veers into tachycardia danger zone. At the mall in hell, which has only a Scotch Tape Nook and a Hickory Farms, the shopper has to be administered cardio pulmonary resuscitation.
FOOD
July 31, 1988 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
As the old saying goes, if you knew you were going to live so long, you would have taken better care of yourself. There is no doubt that we are living longer. In fact, health experts say that in 30 years, more than 50 million Americans will be 65 years old or older. But reaching that milestone doesn't mean a whole lot if you feel lousy once you get there. You know what happens to a car that is left unused for a few months: When you try to start it up, it coughs and wheezes.
SPORTS
October 23, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The defensive-line rotation that has worked so well for the 5-0 Eagles will likely be down a man tomorrow in Cleveland. Backup defensive end Jerome McDougle was added to the Eagles' injury list and designated as doubtful after being diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat after Thursday's practice at the NovaCare Complex. McDougle, a backup to Jevon Kearse at left defensive end, did not practice yesterday. "Jerome came to me after practice [Thursday] and had upper-respiratory-infection-type symptoms," Eagles trainer Rick Burkholder said.
LIVING
July 3, 1995 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since she was 5, Ann Zavitsanos has remembered fainting. She has blacked out on ice-skating rinks, in dentists' offices, at home. She faints regularly, unpredictably, perhaps four times every year. At Lankenau Hospital, she told a nurse that she always fainted when she got a shot. And so, because doctors wanted to observe her fainting symptoms, the nurse slid a needle into her arm, under her taut, broken, translucent skin. Nothing happened. Her fear of injections had not triggered the abnormal reflex that made her faint, the conspiracy between her brain and her heart.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Jesper Parnevik, Europe's top player in the Ryder Cup, withdrew from the World Golf Championship event in Sotogrande, Spain, because of heart problems and probably won't play the rest of the year. His mother, Gertis, said her 34-year-old son was experiencing pain and had an irregular heart beat. She said his sleep had been affected and said he keeps a machine to check his heart rate. Parnevik, known for wearing the bill of his cap flipped up, was 3-1-1 in the Ryder Cup. His condition most likely will keep him from the Million Dollar Challenge in South Africa next month.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
BITING ANALYSIS Since tomorrow is Halloween, we address the question of whether there really are such things as vampires. Eighteenth-century sightings frequently included such evidence as unearthed corpses that seemingly had fattened, that had florid faces and blood coming from the mouth, and that had moved and emitted sounds. In fact, corpses do all those things - but they're the result of decomposition, not supernatural forces, reports Natural History magazine. ALZHEIMER'S FINDING There's encouraging news on Alzheimer's disease: Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered that victims' brains have unusually high levels of receptors for a substance called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF- 1)
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A Common Pleas judge has dismissed murder charges against an Upper Darby man who the prosecution contends "scared to death" a taxi driver on July 27. "At best," said Common Pleas Judge Michael Stiles this week, Vincent Romano, 39, might be found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for causing John Fuscellaro, 49, of 9th Street near Shunk, to suffer a fatal heart attack. The judge left that charge stand against Romano. Defense attorney A. Charles Peruto Jr. had challenged a Municipal Court ruling ordering Romano to stand trial on charges of deliberately killing Fuscellaro.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
A study of pacemakers installed in Philadelphia hospitals in 1983 shows that 20 percent were implanted unnecessarily. In another 36 percent of cases, researchers lacked adequate information to make a judgment on whether the pacemakers were required, either because confirming tests were never performed or because results were not properly charted. A pacemaker is an electric device that works like a spark plug, putting out an electrical charge that stimulates the heart to work at a prescribed rate.
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