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Heart Rate

NEWS
July 26, 2013
1Google Glass Now in beta-test mode, this geeky blend of eye glasses and "heads up" monitor/camera/computer could be the biggest thing in wearable tech since the Walkman. 2Recon Jet From the pioneer in sports-minded heads-up displays, these new, high-tech sunglasses ($499) wirelessly connect to third-party devices to show critical info, including heart rate, cadence and power output. With built-in HD camera! 3iWatch Apple's recent poaching of talent and the spotting of execs wearing sports/activity sensors (FuelBand, Jawbone Up)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013
A step stool can add value to your workout. The good news: you probably already own one. If you don't, they are inexpensive and easy to find at supermarkets, hardware stores and even pharmacies. The simple step-up, step-down movement is just what you need to up the intensity of your cardiovascular workout. Do this for 5 minutes and your heart rate will soar. It's all good, whether your workout is 5 minutes or 55. Once you feel comfortable with the basic move, you can graduate to more complex ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Anna Nguyen, For The Inquirer
Nina Kash is living a life that wasn't possible 40 years ago. The 18-year-old from Malvern was born with a single ventricle heart defect, once a fatal condition. Only one of her heart's two biggest chambers was strong enough to pump effectively. Despite that, Kash is an enthusiastic freshman studying education at Penn State Brandywine. She drives her own car, works at Target during school breaks, volunteers at the Malvern Public Library, and shows a passion for shopping that cannot be denied.
SPORTS
December 9, 2012
Running seems like a simple sport: Throw on some sneakers, a T-shirt, and shorts, and go. But if you're a runner or have a runner on your holiday shopping list, you know it can be a lot more complicated than that. So I asked local running stores what's been flying out of their doors since Black Friday to give you ideas if you have an athlete on your shopping list. Let's start with a big one: a GPS running watch. Not only does this act as a stopwatch, but it will also let you know instantly how far you've run, how fast you're going, and, depending on how many bells and whistles you require (and bucks you want to spend)
SPORTS
October 22, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Belmont Plateau, Neumann University's Dan Rowe had just passed a runner going in the opposite direction. The other runner shouted to Rowe that one of their fellow competitors was passed out in the woods. A lifeguard this past summer for the North Wildwood Beach Patrol, Rowe ran another 50 yards or so and turned a corner, seeing two trail walkers with the fallen runner near the back of the pack. This was Sept. 22, in the 33d annual Philadelphia Metropolitan Cross Country Championships.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Sam Adams, FOR THE INQUIRER
At most concerts, you can tell when a band's set is about to end: Songs grow longer and more dynamic, tempos slow as if seizing on the last chance to stretch the evening out. But if you'd shown up a few minutes late to M83's show at the Electric Factory on Wednesday, you might have cast a worried glance at the time on your ticket. Nearly every song in their hour-plus set sounded like a set-closer, reflecting leader Anthony Gonzales' penchant for playing every song as if it might be his last.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Chronic constipation, heart disease and death Q: I had always believed that Elvis Presley died at 42 from a heart attack. However, I've recently read that his longtime physician George Nichopoulos believes Elvis died from chronic constipation. How does someone die from that? A: According to the autopsy report, hypertensive cardiovascular disease and a "colon problem" were the likely contributing factors to his premature death from a heart attack. It has been reported by his now-retired personal physician that Elvis suffered for years from chronic constipation and that his colon was markedly distended at autopsy.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania House of Representatives has passed a bill designed to protect student athletes with undetected heart ailments from sudden death while playing sports. House Bill 1610 passed unanimously on Monday. Known as the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Prevention Act, it was sponsored by Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery). "I anticipate its moving through the Senate in October, and I'd love to have it to the governor by the end of November," Vereb said by phone from Harrisburg. The bill requires a coach, game official, or school-certified athletic trainer or doctor to be vigilant for signs of sudden cardiac arrest among student athletes.
SPORTS
September 26, 2011 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
SCOTT HARTNELL felt a strange twitching motion in his right arm on Friday night in Detroit. Then he noticed that his heart seemed to be racing a little more than it should have been, considering he was sitting on the bench in Joe Louis Arena. Those two symptoms, which led to the discovery of an alarmingly elevated heart rate, may keep Hartnell off the ice indefinitely, as doctors try to figure the root of the problem. "It wouldn't go down, even after rest, during the intermission," Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren said of Hartnell's heart rate.
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