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Heart Rate

NEWS
June 18, 2001 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sixers fanatic Marc Bernstein sat down to watch Game 4 of the NBA Finals against the Lakers attended by a team of doctors. They drew his blood for testing. They hooked him up to a beeping heart monitor. And they planted him in a La-Z-Boy with a full supply of corn chips, soda and sandwiches. "I'm the guinea pig tonight," Bernstein said Wednesday as a doctor attached electrodes to his chest at an Allentown medical clinic. One of two guinea pigs, actually. As research for a forthcoming article in Men's Health magazine, based in nearby Emmaus, doctors at Allentown's St. Luke's Hospital sequestered two fans - one Sixers, one Lakers - to test how their bodies would react to the vein-popping excitement of televised basketball.
SPORTS
June 8, 2001 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kent Bostick is an Olympian and a two-time Pan American Games gold medalist who has set eight national records in the course of winning 12 national titles during a cycling career that has been nothing short of remarkable. But when Bostick takes to the streets of Philadelphia on Sunday to ride the 156-mile First Union U.S. Pro Championship race, he should be applauded loudest for proving that age is only a number. In Bostick's case, the number is 48. That's an age most people would call "ancient" in a sport that has the aerobic demands of bike racing, and maybe even "decrepit," especially against a lineup heavy with cyclists who have been around half as long as Bostick has. In either case, it rivals the best of George Blanda that, 28 years after Bostick climbed into the saddle for his first cycling race, the Chester, N.J., native not only will compete again Sunday but also will continue his gear-jamming comeback from a fractured femur he sustained a year ago. Bostick credits his competitive longevity to several factors, including the past sponsorship of Shakelee's, the vitamin supplement company whose products he lauds.
SPORTS
January 12, 2001 | By Todd Zolecki, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dobbins Tech's boys' basketball coach said last night from his room at the Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital that he feels fine. Rich Yankowitz was rushed to the hospital Wednesday morning after suffering an adverse reaction to medication for a pinched nerve in his shoulder. His heart began to race, and he became disoriented. "The medication was too strong or something," he said. Once he reached the hospital, doctors returned his heart rate to normal. "I feel great," he said.
SPORTS
September 22, 2000 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was the night before she would face double-session soccer practices, and Jaimie Dougherty was exhausted. A senior at Overbrook, Dougherty is a soccer referee in her spare time. In three days, she had officiated 18 games, including 16 on that Saturday and Sunday alone. Each game was an hour long, meaning she was running for 18 hours. On both weekend days, she was officiating from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. For 16 of the 18 games, she was the lone referee. The ages of the players varied from under-11 to under-15.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A specialized operating room at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton was shut down yesterday after a second incident in which a nurse became ill. Hospital officials said they were perplexed by the string of health problems possibly associated with the operating room. "A nurse became light-headed during an orthopedic procedure Friday morning," said Don Brunn, executive vice president for health services. "It was somewhat different from the other two, because she didn't become sick to her stomach.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Fattest city in America? Even Mayor Street is drumming for a fitter Philly. Could Men's Fitness magazine be right? Maybe. Maybe not. But this much is true: Whatever condition your body's in, it can probably be better. And there's no time like the beginning of a new year to begin building a new you. We'll help. Here's a hint: "Fitness" includes mind, body and spiritual health. The flesh may be flabby, but if the spirit is weak, the weight will hang around, no matter the diet, the workout or roster of resolutions.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Jesper Parnevik, Europe's top player in the Ryder Cup, withdrew from the World Golf Championship event in Sotogrande, Spain, because of heart problems and probably won't play the rest of the year. His mother, Gertis, said her 34-year-old son was experiencing pain and had an irregular heart beat. She said his sleep had been affected and said he keeps a machine to check his heart rate. Parnevik, known for wearing the bill of his cap flipped up, was 3-1-1 in the Ryder Cup. His condition most likely will keep him from the Million Dollar Challenge in South Africa next month.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In recent years, public health officials have been preaching a kinder, gentler philosophy of getting and staying in shape: Instead of a sweat-soaked workout three times a week, simply build 30 minutes of moderate physical activity into your daily life. Two studies in today's Journal of the American Medical Association offer new evidence that it works. "Lifestyle" activity such as short, brisk walks turned out to be as effective as going to the gym in improving respiratory fitness, reducing heart-disease risks, and controlling weight.
SPORTS
December 24, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Dan Reeves was supposed to forget about football this week. The blackout lasted three days. The Atlanta Falcons coach, recovering from heart bypass surgery, delivered a Gipper-like message from his hospital room yesterday. Talking to his players by speaker phone, Reeves congratulated them on their NFC West championship and encouraged them to keep winning. "It was inspirational to know that our coach is still with us," safety William White said. "He's very proud of us, and that just makes us feel so good.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
If there's such a thing as a "mild" heart attack, the one Frank Sinatra suffered yesterday was it. Hospital officials described the incident that put the singer back into the hospital yesterday as an "uncomplicated" heart attack. That means the attack is not associated with more serious heart failure, at least for now. "It means that he has coronary artery disease," said Dr. Irv Herling, a cardiologist and associate professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center.
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