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Heart Rate

SPORTS
January 25, 2002 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Ted Williams, slowed by a series of strokes and congestive heart failure in recent years, was back in the hospital yesterday with a high temperature and low blood pressure. The 83-year-old baseball Hall of Famer was taken from his home by ambulance to Shands Hospital at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He had open-heart surgery last January. Williams was given fluids and antibiotics in the intensive-care unit, and his vital signs improved, the Boston Globe reported last night.
SPORTS
September 1, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Phil Tataurangi collapsed on the 17th tee yesterday during the Air Canada Championship in Surrey, British Columbia, then ignored the advice of doctors and resumed play. Tataurangi, 29, of New Zealand, fell to the ground, clutching his chest, midway through the second round. He never lost consciousness, but paramedics placed him on a stretcher and hooked him up to an oxygen tank. Tataurangi suffers from superventricular tachycardia, a heart condition that causes a sudden increase in his heart rate.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberals may carp that the President has a hard heart. But no one can quibble with its efficiency. The thing's a Swiss clock, a slow-tocking metronome, a humming Texas motor that could very well rank George W. Bush among the world's fittest people - in comparable shape to most professional basketball players, college football players, and major-league baseball players. That's the interpretation of some fitness experts who were wowed by one startling piece of data released by the White House after Bush's medical checkup Saturday: The man's resting heart rate is 43 beats per minute.
NEWS
June 30, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The pager-sized device that Vice President Cheney is likely to have implanted today can monitor his heart rate, shock his heart back into a proper beat if necessary, and transform itself into a pacemaker. And it can all be done by remote control, so doctors do not have to cut into the vice president again. Called an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or ICD, it is a wonder of cutting-edge technology that is starting to soar in use, experts say. "They are the most amazing devices that I can ever imagine," said Sam Sears, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Florida in Gainesville.
NEWS
June 18, 2001 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sixers fanatic Marc Bernstein sat down to watch Game 4 of the NBA Finals against the Lakers attended by a team of doctors. They drew his blood for testing. They hooked him up to a beeping heart monitor. And they planted him in a La-Z-Boy with a full supply of corn chips, soda and sandwiches. "I'm the guinea pig tonight," Bernstein said Wednesday as a doctor attached electrodes to his chest at an Allentown medical clinic. One of two guinea pigs, actually. As research for a forthcoming article in Men's Health magazine, based in nearby Emmaus, doctors at Allentown's St. Luke's Hospital sequestered two fans - one Sixers, one Lakers - to test how their bodies would react to the vein-popping excitement of televised basketball.
SPORTS
June 8, 2001 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kent Bostick is an Olympian and a two-time Pan American Games gold medalist who has set eight national records in the course of winning 12 national titles during a cycling career that has been nothing short of remarkable. But when Bostick takes to the streets of Philadelphia on Sunday to ride the 156-mile First Union U.S. Pro Championship race, he should be applauded loudest for proving that age is only a number. In Bostick's case, the number is 48. That's an age most people would call "ancient" in a sport that has the aerobic demands of bike racing, and maybe even "decrepit," especially against a lineup heavy with cyclists who have been around half as long as Bostick has. In either case, it rivals the best of George Blanda that, 28 years after Bostick climbed into the saddle for his first cycling race, the Chester, N.J., native not only will compete again Sunday but also will continue his gear-jamming comeback from a fractured femur he sustained a year ago. Bostick credits his competitive longevity to several factors, including the past sponsorship of Shakelee's, the vitamin supplement company whose products he lauds.
SPORTS
January 12, 2001 | By Todd Zolecki, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dobbins Tech's boys' basketball coach said last night from his room at the Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital that he feels fine. Rich Yankowitz was rushed to the hospital Wednesday morning after suffering an adverse reaction to medication for a pinched nerve in his shoulder. His heart began to race, and he became disoriented. "The medication was too strong or something," he said. Once he reached the hospital, doctors returned his heart rate to normal. "I feel great," he said.
SPORTS
September 22, 2000 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was the night before she would face double-session soccer practices, and Jaimie Dougherty was exhausted. A senior at Overbrook, Dougherty is a soccer referee in her spare time. In three days, she had officiated 18 games, including 16 on that Saturday and Sunday alone. Each game was an hour long, meaning she was running for 18 hours. On both weekend days, she was officiating from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. For 16 of the 18 games, she was the lone referee. The ages of the players varied from under-11 to under-15.
NEWS
March 28, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A specialized operating room at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton was shut down yesterday after a second incident in which a nurse became ill. Hospital officials said they were perplexed by the string of health problems possibly associated with the operating room. "A nurse became light-headed during an orthopedic procedure Friday morning," said Don Brunn, executive vice president for health services. "It was somewhat different from the other two, because she didn't become sick to her stomach.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Fattest city in America? Even Mayor Street is drumming for a fitter Philly. Could Men's Fitness magazine be right? Maybe. Maybe not. But this much is true: Whatever condition your body's in, it can probably be better. And there's no time like the beginning of a new year to begin building a new you. We'll help. Here's a hint: "Fitness" includes mind, body and spiritual health. The flesh may be flabby, but if the spirit is weak, the weight will hang around, no matter the diet, the workout or roster of resolutions.
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