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Heart Transplant

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NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daily tasks, the little things, have been getting harder for Dan Stickney. In April 1986, Stickney, a sergeant on the Haverford Township police force, suffered a massive heart attack. He was attending a police survival course in Montgomery County, learning how to apprehend felons who have guns. He was wrestling with another police officer when the pain struck. Stickney was determined to recover. In the process, he worked up to walking more than two miles a day. Yet now he can barely walk at all. He can't play ball.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Jefferson Health announced Friday that it was taking the unusual step of voluntarily suspending heart transplant procedures for six to nine months while it begins a "significant redesign" of the program. "Every facet of healthcare delivery in our country is changing, and transplant care is no exception," Anne Docimo, chief medical officer of Jefferson Health, said in a statement. Asked why expansion would require a suspension, spokeswoman Jacqueline Kozloski said, "we are taking a timeout.
SPORTS
February 3, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson was recovering yesterday after a heart transplant. The team issued a statement that said Richardson, 72, underwent the 5-hour overnight procedure at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. He had been on a heart-transplant list since December. Team officials said Richardson was resting comfortably yesterday morning. Dr. Mark Stiegel, one of the doctors who performed the surgery, said "the donor heart was working well. " The normal recovery time is 3-6 months, the team said.
NEWS
December 24, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Bill Frist still keeps a white doctor's coat in his car and has always been willing to dispense medical advice - whether during the anthrax scare on Capitol Hill or on overseas trips he makes to provide medical care to the poor. The Tennessee heart surgeon-turned-politician has a reputation as a deliberate thinker, a recognized expertise on health care issues and a willingness to reach across the aisle - even on issues opposed by others in his party. For instance, when Republicans jettisoned President Clinton's 1995 nomination of Henry Foster as surgeon general, Frist joined Democrats in trying to salvage the nomination of Foster, a fellow Tennessean whom he had known for years.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Kasie Hunt, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Former Vice President Dick Cheney had a heart transplant Saturday and is recovering at a Virginia hospital, his office said. An aide disclosed that Cheney, 71, who has had a long history of cardiovascular trouble including numerous heart attacks, had been waiting for a transplant for more than 20 months. "Although the former vice president and his family do not know the identity of the donor, they will be forever grateful for this lifesaving gift," aide Kara Ahern said in a written statement that was authenticated by several of the Republican politician's close associates.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Highway Patrolman Mike Rash, the only police officer in the country ever to return to hazardous street duty after a heart transplant, died last night at Temple University Hospital - one year to the day after he received his new heart at Temple. Rash, 30, died about 6:30 p.m., police officials said. While the cause of his death was not immediately known, his new heart had been showing signs of rejection, officials said. The officer, a member of the force for eight years, had been admitted to the hospital Saturday, a hospital spokesman said.
NEWS
February 13, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tonya Kay Love of Bensalem, the recipient of a heart transplant in May, died Friday at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, eight days after her 18th birthday. Miss Love received a transplant at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia to replace a "complex congenital heart with multiple holes and a small left ventricle. " After the surgery, doctors said the next year would be a "delicate time" because of the possibility that her body would reject the new heart.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Chris McAllister had been prepared by his family physician for the message that he would receive from the doctors at Temple University Hospital: a virus had attacked his heart. A transplant was inevitable. What the doctors there could not prepare him for was the support from some of his neighbors in Collingdale. That support - in the form of various fund-raising efforts - will help McAllister pay for a heart transplant. Doctors have told him that the cost of the operation will exceed $150,000.
NEWS
April 11, 1995 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dick Pothier, 55, a former Inquirer reporter whose most famous story was a vivid personal account of his own 1989 heart transplant, died yesterday at his home in West Townshend, Vt. Mr. Pothier's first-person tale about his operation appeared in Inquirer Magazine six years ago. Later reprinted in Reader's Digest, it won him a measure of fame, allowing him to serve as an eloquent spokesman for those who had transplants. In retirement in Vermont, where he lived in a log cabin beside a creek, Mr. Pothier occasionally ventured forth - usually on his motorcyle - to appear at medical conferences, do TV and radio talk shows, or write op-ed pieces about transplantation.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
For Julie Keeton, the only thing worse than learning that the Short family died over the weekend - the result of a murder-suicide - has been the presumption by some that Megan Short, who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, was the shooter. "Media outlets are spinning a narrative that the PTSD could've been her motive," says Keeton, a friend of Short. "I don't believe for a minute that she did this. " Keeton seethes at headlines like "MOTHER STRUGGLED WITH EMOTIONS," in Monday's Reading Eagle.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Jefferson Health announced Friday that it was taking the unusual step of voluntarily suspending heart transplant procedures for six to nine months while it begins a "significant redesign" of the program. "Every facet of healthcare delivery in our country is changing, and transplant care is no exception," Anne Docimo, chief medical officer of Jefferson Health, said in a statement. Asked why expansion would require a suspension, spokeswoman Jacqueline Kozloski said, "we are taking a timeout.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2016
In the Region Tabula Rasa plans stock sale Tabula Rasa HealthCare Inc. , which operates drug software maker CareKinesis, among other brands, has filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission in hopes of raising $115 million in a public stock sale. The money will go to pay back investors, including Eastward Fund Management and Bridge Bank NA , and to add products and buy companies. The Moorestown-based company, headed by CEO Calvin Knowlton, employs about 180 and booked sales of $50 million from January through September 2015, up from $35 million in the first nine months of 2014.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN NOBLE Khayee Lee saw the comely young woman in a Chinese market at 22nd and Lehigh, he knew she was the woman for him. There was just one problem. Noble was afflicted with crippling shyness. But love conquers all, as the saying goes, and love conquered Noble's shyness. "I got up my courage and spoke to her," he said. "She was so happy and smiling. I felt comfortable right away talking to her. " Noble had no way of knowing that the young woman, Alexis Sloan, had gained a kind of notoriety by being one of the five people who received the organs of a boxer, Francisco "Paco" Rodriguez, who died of head injuries in 2009 at age 25 after a bout at the Blue Horizon.
SPORTS
August 5, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kennedy Cunningham was one step ahead of her father, Steve, at DSG Boxing Gym one afternoon last month. While Cunningham, a 39-year-old heavyweight from Philadelphia, changed into his workout spandex, his 9-year-old daughter pulled on big red gloves and threw them at a punching bag. While Steve had his hands taped, Kennedy stepped into the ring and playfully sparred with her 4-year-old brother, Cruz. Cruz backed her into a corner, and she fought her way out, squinting and smiling.
SPORTS
April 26, 2015 | Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacob Hafer was in a hurry on Friday. He wanted to get the Berks Catholic 4x100 relay team off to a fast start in its race at the 121st Penn Relays. He also wanted to get back to the Reading area in time to prepare for his senior prom. Hafer has a busy life. A good life. A miraculous life. "Someone died so I could live," Hafer said in a stark and poignant description of his special place in this world as the recipient of a heart transplant. Hafer, a thoughtful 19-year-old, will be the first to say that every day is special for him. But some days are more special than others.
SPORTS
December 7, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
STEVE CUNNINGHAM has won 28 professional fights, is a two-time IBF cruiserweight world champion and only 2 months ago defended his USBA heavyweight belt. The Philadelphia boxer's daughter won a much bigger battle yesterday. Kennedy Cunningham, 9, who since birth has had a rare congenital heart defect called hypoplastic left heart syndrome, had a successful heart transplant yesterday at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Kennedy's story has garnered national attention since it was shared on the NBC Sports Network's telecast of Cunningham's April victory over Amir Mansour at the Liacouras Center.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Rebecca Voltmer watches her classmates run through a dress rehearsal of You Can't Take It With You , the 1937 Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy. It's hell week - theater-speak for the days before opening night - and the Abington Senior High School cast is amped. Rebecca stands a curtain fold from being on stage, blond hair sliding over her shoulders, arms hugging her gray sweatshirt, smiling at a funny line. And then longing captures her face. She so wants to be out there, bathed in the footlights, exchanging lines with the other actors.
SPORTS
November 26, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
WHEN JALEEL Benton awoke in his North Philadelphia home in early October, he had an uncomfortable feeling in his chest. Once a shy and socially anxious youngster, Benton had found a measure of confidence on the football field. The 6-5, 375-pound nose guard for Prep Charter hadn't grown up immersed in the game. In fact, he didn't play high school ball at all until his junior year. Nevertheless, a passion developed quickly. However, on that morning, Benton, now a senior, had no idea the game he loved would be taken away forever.
SPORTS
June 17, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
PINEHURST, N.C. - Erik Compton has never won a PGA Tour event. He nearly picked a heckuva place to start. Many knew his story. Now it's out there for real. He had a heart transplant when he was 12. Then he had to have another 6 years ago. At 34, he's living his dreams. Or perhaps he's exceeding them. "It's a really special moment," he said yesterday at Pinehurst No. 2, after finishing a distant second to a guy who was pretty much unbeatable. "Nobody was catching [Martin Kaymer]
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