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Heating System

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NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
Corroded boiler tubes, rusty cast-iron traps and deteriorating control valves in the heating system at the Octorara Intermediate School and High School may force the school board to spend more than $1.13 million on a new heating system for the two schools. The last four years, the boiler tubes, which are from 50 to 75 feet long and cost several thousand dollars each, have been replaced each summer, said Rick Kolb, consulting engineer with Consolidated Engineers of Sinking Spring, Pa. At a board meeting Monday, Kolb suggested that the district replace each school's 30-year-old heating system instead of replacing the parts.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Octorara school board members continue to discuss a proposed $4.3 million bond issue that would be used to renovate district buildings and improve facilities. A resident, Charles E. Smallwood of Christana, asked the board to gather more information before deciding whether to replace the heating system for the schools complex. The cost of the project is estimated at $940,000. Smallwood said he had met with the district's architect, William Gallagher of The Design Coalition of Lancaster.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Dan Hardy, Special to The Inquirer
The East Lansdowne Borough Council has rejected a bid for the installation of a new heating system for the Borough Hall and will ask for another round of bids in time for its August meeting. At Monday's meeting, the council voted, 5-0, to reject the only bid submitted for the heating system - a $22,380 bid from the M. A. Snyder Co. of Upper Darby. Council members George Bobnak and Michael Wells were absent. "In the absence of other bids, I don't know if this is the best price we can get, so I recommend that the Borough Council ask for new bids," borough engineer Edward Korab said.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Investigators continued yesterday to focus on the electrical baseboard heating system as the likely ignition source in Friday's blaze that claimed the lives of a woman and her three daughters in their Levittown home. Fire Marshal Ed Copper said that although the investigation was inconclusive, he was still leaning toward the fixed baseboard heat as the source for the 1:57 a.m. fire. Thomas Krutsch, a deputy Bucks County fire marshal, joined Copper again yesterday at the house, along with representatives of a Philadelphia law firm acting on behalf of the family's insurance carrier, including former Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Joe Rizzo.
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rev. Margaret Floyd, 65, is tired of sleeping in five layers of clothing and in shoes to stay warm in her one-bedroom apartment. Meanwhile, some of her neighbors in the sprawling Lynnewood Gardens complex are equally tired of stripping down to shorts because their homes are too hot. The problem, the management told about 50 angry tenants at a monthly meeting Saturday, is an outdated boiler system and no money to replace it. "The system...
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Correspondents Mary Anne Janco and Joyce Vottima Hellberg contributed to this article
Ice and snow always cause headaches for school superintendents, but yesterday's weather conditions gave Radnor's John DeFlaminis more than his share of troubles. Below-zero temperatures burst 20 pipes at Radnor Middle School, and an aging heating system at Radnor High School refused to warm things up above 50 degrees. And after jump-starting more than 55 school buses for a planned two- hour delayed school opening, there were not enough drivers or clear roadways to leave the lot. "A lot of bus drivers were unable to come in, and that along with the icy condition of the roads would have slowed down the runs," DeFlaminis said.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | By Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writer
The parents of two small children who were scalded to death in the bathtub of their Public Housing Authority apartment have filed suit alleging that authority officials caused the deaths by failing to inspect the apartment's heating system. The suit was filed in Common Pleas Court Monday by Kevin and Sandra Wilson, who had lived in the 16-story Queen Lane public housing project, on Queen Lane near Pulaski Avenue, Germantown, only about two weeks when Troy Ayers, 2 1/2, and his baby brother, Kevin, 13 months, died there Feb. 9. The children had climbed into the bathtub and turned on the water while their parents, both 25, were napping in a bedroom, two rooms away.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester High School was plunged into a deep freeze after the heating system failed last week, and administrators had to close off the first two floors. "This unusually cold winter, with temperatures in the teens for several days in a row, has strained the very old heating system at Chester High School," said Chester Upland Superintendent Gregory Shannon. School started two hours late Monday and Tuesday as administrators shuffled students and teachers onto the third, fourth, and fifth floors.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | By Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
An autopsy was scheduled to be performed today on a 72-year-old Germantown woman who was found dead yesterday in her carbon-monoxide-filled apartment, the medical examiner's office said. Police found Florence Stewart in her third-floor apartment while they were helping firefighters rescue 13 other residents of the building on Walnut Lane near Morton Street shortly after 6 a.m. yesterday. Investigators said it was possible the fumes that seeped into the six-unit building had come from a blocked gas-furnace flue.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | By David Enscoe, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken school board agreed last night to pursue an $11 million expansion and renovation program at Pennsauken High School, the middle school and at least two elementary schools. Funding for most of the project, the district's first in 22 years, would have to be approved by voters in a bond referendum. Nearly half the money is targeted for renovations and construction of a science wing at the high school. The one-story addition would house 13 laboratories, and the current outdated facilities would be converted into 18 classrooms.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
March 14, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
It's almost spring, and my electronic desk is accumulating more advice than I can share with you in a lifetime. An interesting bit of counsel comes from Lennox, which manufactures heating, ventilation and air-conditioning equipment: Leaves, weeds and grass collect on outdoor condenser units during the fall and winter, resulting in blocked air flow and reduced energy efficiency. Clearing the debris allows for unrestricted airflow, improving an air-conditioning system's efficiency, reducing operating costs, keeping the air clean, and increasing energy savings.
REAL_ESTATE
December 6, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Where does the time go? Just when you finally get the central air-conditioning working well enough to make the house comfortable, cold weather threatens to show up. Here are some ideas that might help cut your energy costs this winter, courtesy of Sunnova, the solar-power company: Does your house really need hot water when no one's home? Probably not. Consider installing a timer on your water heater, to turn it off when you're not there. Use cold water instead of hot when washing clothes.
REAL_ESTATE
November 2, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I'm not a farmer, but the Farmer's Almanac is suggesting that this winter might be worse than the last one. Looking at the almanac's map, the Philadelphia area falls into the "crisp and very stormy" category, whatever that means. I'm still saving for a portable generator myself. But even if we don't get another round of tree-snapping ice and power outages, with colder weather generally come higher energy bills. Windows and doors can be big sources of heat loss. Don't skimp on weather stripping.
REAL_ESTATE
March 30, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
The financial reality that the Mitchell family faced in 2010 was this: Their perfect home in West Chester had to be sold. Josh Mitchell, now 38, a self-employed contractor, had worked on the fieldstone rancher for 10 years. But a crisis involving wife Dawn's stationery shop - her partner suddenly pulled out - created debt, and when she became pregnant with the couple's third child, she closed the store. So they decided to create a new reality: They'd buy and restore a cheap house in a good neighborhood - luckily, just five minutes away, on the street where Dawn Mitchell's parents lived - and they would nearly double its 1,110-square-foot size.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he came to work in January, Jason Allen got a chilly reception. A boiler pump providing heat for the Camden County Historical Society building complex in Camden had broken down during the holiday break as outside temperatures plummeted to single digits. Allen, the society's executive director, quickly called in a contractor, who restored the heat but unintentionally set in motion an even bigger problem that will end up costing about $100,000. Frozen water pipes thawed, then sprouted leaks at couplings in ceilings and walls over the next few days - first in the Camden County Museum, then in the Charles S. Boyer Building, where the Richard Hineline Library and administrative offices are located, and later in Pomona Hall, an 18th-century plantation house.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester High School was plunged into a deep freeze after the heating system failed last week, and administrators had to close off the first two floors. "This unusually cold winter, with temperatures in the teens for several days in a row, has strained the very old heating system at Chester High School," said Chester Upland Superintendent Gregory Shannon. School started two hours late Monday and Tuesday as administrators shuffled students and teachers onto the third, fourth, and fifth floors.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add flushing a toilet to the list of ways to help the environment. PSE&G is funding a $1.3 million project at Camden County's sewage treatment plant using geothermal technology to heat buildings with raw sewage. The technology is used in Europe and China. Paris' historic sewer system - a popular tourist destination - also has a project in the works. But the local project is believed to be the first of its kind in the United States, said Jack DiEnna, executive director of the Geothermal National and International Initiative, an industry group.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I need some guidance. Even though my gas heater/hot water radiators are still working, I'm thinking about having a heating specialist replace my more-than-50-year-old system with a newer one that might include central air. The problem is that I know absolutely nothing about what I should look for in a system, either combined with central air, or just the heating alone. I have a small, two-story, three-bedroom, brick rowhouse, about 800 to 1,000 square feet, with a basement that runs the length of the house and an attached garage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2010 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HERE'S SOMETHING it would be nice to know before you got on a Boeing 757: Every once in awhile there's a problem with the window heating system. It's been enough of a problem that Boeing knows of 29 incidents over eight years involving the window heating system on its 747s, 757s, 767s, and 777s. The airplane manufacturer issued safety bulletins to airlines between 2004 and 2007 requiring them to check for a loose screw holding the wires connected to the heating system. Planes made since 2005 have used a different wiring system that Boeing believes has solved the problem, spokeswoman Sandra Angers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
HERE'S SOMETHING it would be nice to know before you got on a Boeing 757: Every once in awhile there's a problem with the window heating system. It's been enough of a problem that Boeing knows of 29 incidents over eight years involving the window heating system on its 747s, 757s, 767s, and 777s. The airplane manufacturer issued safety bulletins to airlines between 2004 and 2007 requiring them to check for a loose screw holding the wires connected to the heating system. Planes made since 2005 have used a different wiring system that Boeing believes has solved the problem, spokeswoman Sandra Angers said.
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