CollectionsHeavy Metal
IN THE NEWS

Heavy Metal

FIND MORE STORIES »
NEWS
November 12, 1997 | by Julie Knipe Brown and April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Dave Davies, Jonathan Takiff and Mister Mann Frisby contributed to this report
They drank some, smoked some and moshed some. A few men and women even bared their chests some. But when it was all said and done, by some estimates, the heavy metal mob at yesterday's parking lot Metallica concert was tamer than the 700 level at Veterans Stadium during the Monday night Eagles game. Despite the neighborhood's fear of riots, traffic jams and thundering guitars, fans and security guards judged the the crowd staid and the music about as loud as the Beach Boys.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1988 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penelope Spheeris anxiously surveyed her posh suite at Park Avenue's Regency Hotel. A scruffy band of heavy-metal rockers had called the film director to say they had just arrived in town and needed a place to stay. They were on their way. Spheeris, 42, had spent six long months penetrating the world of head- bangers for her latest documentary, The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years (which opened at the Roxy Screening Rooms Friday). Now, they were about to enter hers.
NEWS
March 13, 2000 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Chris Gamble, the flaxen-haired lead singer and guitarist for the band Bloodstorm, mounted the stage at the March Metal Meltdown late Friday and gave the fans exactly what they had come for. "This one is for you occultists," growled Gamble, whose face was painted white, with red streaks dripping from his eyes, and who goes by the name Mezzadurus - which the singer said was the moniker of a wizard from Atlantis. "This song is called 'Spell of the Burning Wind.' " Gamble, wearing what appeared to be chain mail, and the rest of Bloodstorm launched into a wall of noise that left the cavernous South Jersey Expo Center quaking.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was a party that Mario Parrillo would have loved. The insistent thump of loud guitar music poured from the doors of a club where friends and family gathered, talking, laughing, singing. But it was a bittersweet night. Parrillo, who had played guitar and written songs since age 10, died of cancer four months ago at the age of 35. Late last month, friends staged a benefit concert to help his wife with unpaid medical bills. Beth Parrillo said the tribute to her husband, who played mostly heavy metal music, was just about perfect.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ooh, ready or not, here we come, Gonna set this town alive; The boys are ready, we're out to rock; Gonna turn it up tonight - "Eye to Eye," by Slaughter What exactly had Doris and Donald Zimmermann gotten themselves into? So they had a spare bedroom, clean towels and plenty of potato salad. But was that enough to host four leonine-tressed heavy-metal stars, their three girlfriends - one of them a 4-foot-9 soft-porn actress and exotic dancer - and five roadies, all with fathomless appetites and alps of dirty laundry?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soundgarden is single-handedly revolutionizing heavy metal. In the beginning, when Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple first reworked the blues, the music's appeal was universal. But since the early '70s, the genre has spoken mostly to suburban teenage boys. At the Tower Theater on Thursday, Soundgarden reclaimed heavy metal for the masses. The work of heavy metal's pioneers remains the bedrock of the Seattle quartet's tunes. Approximately half of Thursday's show was devoted to that older, simpler material.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
The sleeve art on Ozzy Osbourne: Don't Blame Me (100 minutes, $19.98) could be mistaken for a GQ magazine cover shot - the rock star is shown in repose, clad in a spiffy plaid sports jacket and bangle bracelets. It's the first intimation that Sony Music Video's documentary might treat Osbourne's career with a seriousness foreign to heavy-metal music. And it does. Using the expansive length of a motion picture (perhaps too much length for the unconverted), filmmaker Jeb Brien ranges across more than 20 years in Osbourne's career, hitting the highs and lows with a refreshing evenhandedness.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
McDonald's customers who bought Shrek -themed glasses at the restaurant chain can return them starting Wednesday for $3 a glass, the company said. McDonald's announced the recall Friday of 12 million souvenir glasses because the glasses were decorated with materials that contain cadmium, a heavy metal that poses health risks. McDonald's said that the Consumer Product Safety Commission says "the glassware is not toxic" and that the recall is being conducted "out of an abundance of caution.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
A couple of times each week, a longhaired group of young men clad in leather clamorously disrupts the peace of a Far Northeast neighborhood of rowhouses. In the dark recesses of a garage, the group's members bang and clang pieces of metal, screaming about their fantasies, their loves, their hates. Black Task, as the gang of four calls itself, is a sometimes heavy-metal, sometimes rock, sometimes blues band that practices its deafening songs in the Parkwood neighborhood. And if these Northeast natives - Warren Ay, Gus Santiago, Steve Kristiansen and Jim Trub - get their way, the group might well be Philadelphia's next Hall and Oates and hit Top 10 charts across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
Led Zeppelin casts a mighty shadow. Heavy metal existed before the mighty quartet first squawked in 1969; the term is often traced to the "heavy metal thunder line" in Steppenwolf's "Born to Be Wild," and Led Zeppelin could be described as no less. From the first booming chords of "Good Times, Bad Times," the first track on the debut album, it was clear that an essential part of this band's raison d'etre was to be so brazen that if the music didn't lift you up, it could just as well send you hurtling to the ground.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|