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Hedgerow Theatre

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NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
From: Mr. Sherlock Holmes To: Dr. Watson I say, my dear Watson, we can make immediate deductions from our visit to Sherlock Holmes and the Crucifer of Blood at the indubitably pleasant Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley - you know, just down the lane from the county town they call Media. First off, the play by Paul Giovanni - the same one that featured Glenn Close as the female lead on Broadway in 1978 and Charlton Heston as myself in that 1991 telly movie - is loose as the ashes in my pipe bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2016
Servant of Two Masters Through June 26 at Hedgerow Theatre, 64 Rose Valley Rd., Rose Valley. $20-$34. 610-565-4211, hedgerowtheatre.org.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Few farces achieve the status of high art, and Marc Camoletti's Boeing-Boeing is not one of them. But the Hedgerow Theatre's actor-driven production shrugs off any high-minded concerns in pursuit of two-hours of nearly non-stop laughter. In the 1960s, American architect Bernard (Andrew Parcell) lives in Paris, where he juggles relationships with three airline stewardesses. His mild-mannered lothario manages this difficult feat not through charisma but rather by keeping close track of the airline flight schedules and making himself available accordingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfeld, For The Inquirer
I'm not sure why, with all the advances women have made in, well, everything, but certainly playwriting, Hedgerow Theatre chose to haul out Jack Heifner's 1976 hit dramedy Vanities . However, I'm 100 percent certain that, much like the three Southern belles at its core, it didn't age well. In 2009, someone thought Vanities had the makings of a Broadway musical. Fortunately, that effort never made it to the big time, and its consolation prize, an Off-Broadway run, closed after a month.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Two Into One is the 10th Ray Cooney farce produced by Hedgerow Theatre. It's also the 10th with longtime company members Zoran Kovcic and Susan Wefel. And it's the second Cooney work featuring Kovcic as the hapless George Pigden, personal secretary to extramaritally inclined member of Parliament - wait for it - Richard Willey (Shaun Yates) and his lusty wife Pamela (Rebecca Cureton). The first was Out of Order , which premiered in 1981. The 30th anniversary seems an appropriate time to remind audiences why the company keeps turning to this particular Brit for its summer entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Every summer for a dozen years, Hedgerow Theatre has trotted out a farce - some new, some old - by England's reigning farceur, Ray Cooney. Run for Your Wife was their first, as well as Cooney's most successful, and the company revives it again with Penelope Reed behind its wildly veering wheel. The comedy ran for nine years on London's West End, closing in 1991, but last year received an abysmal screen treatment that left reviewers decrying its stale humor. So, have we moved past this zigzagging farce's freshness date?
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Just in time for Valentine's Day, Hedgerow Theatre serves up the world premiere of Larry McKenna's Strictly Platonic , a cute, chocolate-covered cherry of a romantic comedy. McKenna's 11-scene, 90-minute script wastes no time setting up its well-worn premise: It poses the life-altering question, "Do you ever look for meaningful relationships?" The recipient of that question invariably is a self-centered, shallow playboy, in this case, real estate agent Tim (Brendan Cataldo). We meet him in the first scene as he rides home on the train from a night of bar hopping - and phone-number scoring - with his best friend, Josh (Jamie Goldman)
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Does it matter if a professional theater panders to its audience? The Hedgerow Theatre has produced a Ray Cooney farce for 11 summers straight, and the company's artistic director, Penelope Reed, certainly doesn't think so. During her preshow address, a sea of eager hands shot up when Reed asked who had already seen one of their Cooney productions. In response, Reed exclaimed, "That's why we do them!" In her defense, Cooney has penned some of the genre's most successful plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Only one fault mars Hedgerow Theatre's chilling production of Shakespeare's Macbeth : that the audience, so close to the action in that intimate farmhouse space, nonetheless does not actually lie within the world of the play. It's a metaphysical objection, I realize, that no staging could surmount. However, director Dan Hodge and his design team try hard to overcome it in their vivid blend of psychological thriller and supernatural terror. In Patrick Lamborn's World War I-era sound design, the screams of propellers and the roar of dogfights raging overhead contrast with the wails of witches wafting up from the earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
If The Mysterious Affair at Styles sounds like a long-winded title, well, it's a long play with a convoluted plot. With mixed success, the Hedgerow Theatre's world premiere of Jared Reed's adaptation of this, Agatha Christie's first novel, tries to enliven the plot while keeping every clue and wrinkle. Styles is a manor in Essex, where, in 1916, the widowed Emily Inglethorp (Stacy Skinner) resides with her new, decades-younger husband, Alfred (Mark Swift). Emily's two step-sons, John (Ned Pryce)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Few farces achieve the status of high art, and Marc Camoletti's Boeing-Boeing is not one of them. But the Hedgerow Theatre's actor-driven production shrugs off any high-minded concerns in pursuit of two-hours of nearly non-stop laughter. In the 1960s, American architect Bernard (Andrew Parcell) lives in Paris, where he juggles relationships with three airline stewardesses. His mild-mannered lothario manages this difficult feat not through charisma but rather by keeping close track of the airline flight schedules and making himself available accordingly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2016
Servant of Two Masters Through June 26 at Hedgerow Theatre, 64 Rose Valley Rd., Rose Valley. $20-$34. 610-565-4211, hedgerowtheatre.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2016 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
If The Mysterious Affair at Styles sounds like a long-winded title, well, it's a long play with a convoluted plot. With mixed success, the Hedgerow Theatre's world premiere of Jared Reed's adaptation of this, Agatha Christie's first novel, tries to enliven the plot while keeping every clue and wrinkle. Styles is a manor in Essex, where, in 1916, the widowed Emily Inglethorp (Stacy Skinner) resides with her new, decades-younger husband, Alfred (Mark Swift). Emily's two step-sons, John (Ned Pryce)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016
Theater A Christmas Story: The Musical Musical stage adaptation of the classic holiday movie. Closes 1/10. Walnut Street Theatre, 825 Walnut St.; 215-574-3550. $20-$95. A Moon for the Misbegotten 2 lost souls find solace with one another on a Connecticut farm. Closes 2/7. Walnut Street Theatre - Independence Studio on 3, 825 Walnut St.; 215-574-3550. $30-$35. Bearlesque Philadelphia-based burlesque ensemble largely comprised of husky men. Closes 1/14. Kung Fu Necktie, 1248 N. Front St.; 215-291-4945.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most important moment in Susan Wefel's life may have come when she was 5. She saw Mary Martin in the Broadway production of Peter Pan when it was televised for the first time in 1955, and was soon out in the backyard of her Cleveland home, directing siblings and friends in her own production. "We used the swing set for the 'I'm flying' scene," Wefel recalled. She starred in high school productions, studied drama at Boston University, and in 1978 joined the company at Hedgerow Theatre in Rose Valley, taking a room in the century-old Hedgerow House, where all the theater's new young actors lived.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfeld, For The Inquirer
I'm not sure why, with all the advances women have made in, well, everything, but certainly playwriting, Hedgerow Theatre chose to haul out Jack Heifner's 1976 hit dramedy Vanities . However, I'm 100 percent certain that, much like the three Southern belles at its core, it didn't age well. In 2009, someone thought Vanities had the makings of a Broadway musical. Fortunately, that effort never made it to the big time, and its consolation prize, an Off-Broadway run, closed after a month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Only one fault mars Hedgerow Theatre's chilling production of Shakespeare's Macbeth : that the audience, so close to the action in that intimate farmhouse space, nonetheless does not actually lie within the world of the play. It's a metaphysical objection, I realize, that no staging could surmount. However, director Dan Hodge and his design team try hard to overcome it in their vivid blend of psychological thriller and supernatural terror. In Patrick Lamborn's World War I-era sound design, the screams of propellers and the roar of dogfights raging overhead contrast with the wails of witches wafting up from the earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Every summer for a dozen years, Hedgerow Theatre has trotted out a farce - some new, some old - by England's reigning farceur, Ray Cooney. Run for Your Wife was their first, as well as Cooney's most successful, and the company revives it again with Penelope Reed behind its wildly veering wheel. The comedy ran for nine years on London's West End, closing in 1991, but last year received an abysmal screen treatment that left reviewers decrying its stale humor. So, have we moved past this zigzagging farce's freshness date?
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANCIS JUDSON Laird III was a member of a family that was prominent in a tiny municipality scrunched into the midst of Nether Providence Township in Delaware County. His father had been mayor of the .74-acre borough of Rose Valley, whose main attractions have for decades been the School in Rose Valley, Hedgerow Theatre and the Old Mill, a picturesque setting for weddings and other social events on the banks of Ridley Creek. Jud, as he was known, was part of a family that traced its lineage to Joseph Pennock, a pal of William Penn, and other early Quaker settlers.
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