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Heiress

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NEWS
May 25, 2011
Huguette Clark, 104, the heiress to a Montana copper fortune who once lived in the largest apartment on Fifth Avenue, died Tuesday at a Manhattan hospital even as an investigation continues into how her millions were handled. Ms. Clark spent the last two decades of her life in New York hospitals. She died "with dignity and privacy," her attorney, Wallace Bock, said in a statement. The Manhattan district attorney is looking into claims made by Ms. Clark's family that she was kept isolated from almost everyone except Bock and her accountant and that she might not have understood decisions being made related to her fortune.
NEWS
August 19, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Oil heiress Caroline Skelly was robbed at knifepoint early yesterday of between $5 million to $10 million in gems - her fourth time as a robbery victim in nine years - and later declared she was swearing off jewelry. Skelly, 64, said afterward: "From now on, I'm only going to wear costume jewelry. " It was the second million-dollar heist from a Newport mansion in less than a month. Skelly's copy of a French chateau, located on Newport's "Millionaire's Row," was broken into about 4 a.m. by a man wearing a ski mask.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
I'd hate to play poker with Gerald Gutierrez. The director of Ruth and Augustus Goetz's The Heiress, which opened Thursday in a Lincoln Center production at the Cort, has managed to stage the whole thing without so much as a solitary giggle. You'd never guess he was holding nothing more than a pair of eights. Well, let's not be ungenerous. The Heiress, a 1947 Broadway hit based on Henry James' 1881 novel Washington Square, isn't really a bad play - just, perhaps, an irrelevant one. If you surrender to its creaky theatricality, it can work pretty well, which is why Gutierrez has had the good sense to play it absolutely straight.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia promoter of the "human potential movement" has been ordered by a Common Pleas Court judge to make restitution of $839,947 to a disabled Kennett Square heiress who fell under the man's influence. Judge Louis G. Hill ordered Robert Toporek to return $564,947 to Suzanne V.M. Squires, heiress to part of the SmithKline Beckman Corp. pharmaceutical fortune, and to deed over to Squires a $275,000 home she purchased for Toporek in the 2300 block of Delancey Street in 1983.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat, 90, who built a billion-dollar fortune with her late husband's Argentine cement companies and became a leading art collector, died Saturday in her luxury apartment in Buenos Aires. Ms. Fortabat became one of Argentina's wealthiest women at age 54, when her second husband, Alfredo Fortabat, 27 years her senior, died in 1976. At the time, Argentina had just fallen under a dictatorship with close ties to the country's wealthy business elites, and the Loma Negra cement businesses flourished through government contracts with the military junta.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
As federal prosecutors tell it, a few days before Christmas 2009, Agnes O'Brien emailed Campbell Soup heiress Mary Alice Malone, for whom she once worked as a personal concierge, cook and confidant. The email was titled "When the Soup Boils. " O'Brien told Malone that she was writing a "work of fiction based on [her] personal experience. " O'Brien allegedly wrote in the email that Maggie (the fictional Agnes O'Brien) was "not willing to be victimized . . . after 30 years of loyal service" and that she hoped that the book would "create a lifelong home and security" for her. She later suggested that Malone could avoid being mentioned in the tell-all book by paying her $250,000 a year for life.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Philadelphia Daily News
A North Carolina woman who posed as the heiress to a fake $2-billion estate was sentenced to five years in federal prison today for her role in an investment scam. Bari Lynn Berger, 68, of Durham, scammed more than 140 investors-including 40 from Philadelphia-of at least $1.6 million from January 2008 to Jan. 2009. Berger pleaded guilty in December to mail and wire fraud. Investors were told Berger was the illegitimate daughter of a billionaire who did not approve of her lifestyle and stipulated in his will that she had to become financially stable and receive necessary medical care in order to be eligible to receive the nest egg. Victims of the scam - often wealthy, elderly individuals interested in get-rich-quick schemes - were told that if they helped Berger, she would repay them with a "gift" from the estate.
NEWS
May 25, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Huguette Clark, a 104-year-old heiress to a Montana copper fortune who once lived in the largest apartment on New York City's Fifth Avenue, died yesterday at a Manhattan hospital. The reclusive Clark spent the last two decades of her life in New York City hospitals, but Manhattan prosecutors are still pursuing a case over her money and care. "Miss Clark's passing is a sad event for all those who have loved and respected her over the years," her attorney, Wallace Bock, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tereza Solomon Demoody was notorious for showing up hours late for appointments or canceling at the last minute, according to the people who knew her. So they weren't surprised when the woman who had told them she was an heiress, socialite, doctor and philanthropist failed to arrive on time for a scheduled hearing earlier this week on charges that she conned a Main Line real estate executive out of $80,000. Yesterday, she not only was on time, she showed up considerably early for her rescheduled hearing before District Justice Henry J. Schireson - having been brought in handcuffs from the Montgomery County prison, where Schireson had sent her Tuesday.
NEWS
September 18, 2007 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With 30 days of court-ordered psychiatric treatment now behind her, a smiling Susan Tabas Tepper arrived at Montgomery County Court yesterday, where she received a sentence of 15 months' probation and a $600 fine for attacking her second employee in a year. The Villanova heiress, 44, pleaded guilty in July to physically harassing her Polish housekeeper and nanny, Urszula Kordzior, and the woman's 9-year-old daughter. Police say an irate Tepper pushed Kordzior, 46, to the ground and shoved the girl when Kordzior tried to go home for the evening on May 20. The attack violated Tepper's probation for a previous incident in which she lobbed a bag of carrots and a cell phone at nanny Xiomara D. Salinas, a Nicaraguan immigrant, on May 21, 2006.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A CERTAIN irritation is festering between a married Main Line millionaire couple, and the wife has made a rash decision, according to a court filing by her husband. Athanasios Konidaris contends that his wife, Shelley Upsher Konidaris, one of two heirs to the Desitin (diaper-rash cream) fortune, is being duped by opportunistic grifters who've poisoned her mind against him and seek to fleece her out of Desitin's millions. The couple until recently shared a home in Bala Cynwyd.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Michael Biesecker, Associated Press
GREENSBORO, N.C. - Shortly before his 2011 indictment on corruption charges, John Edwards called the elderly heiress whose money helped hide his pregnant mistress and asked for $3 million more, a witness testified Monday at the trial of the former presidential candidate. Librarian Tony L. Willis testified his boss, 101-year-old Rachel "Bunny" Mellon, sought his help in drafting a letter to the politician. Willis said Mellon told him she received a call from Edwards last year seeking $3 million to help him launch the next phase of his life.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. - A cooperating witness testified Wednesday that he crashed a heavy plumber's wrench into the skull and face of a Florida millionaire's mother in an attack planned by the millionaire's wife and her brother. And after he was congratulated on "a good job" in the fatal attack, he was recruited into another plot to attack the millionaire himself, hotel heir Ben Novack Jr., the witness said. Alejandro Garcia, 34, a Nicaraguan illegally in the U.S., testified at the federal murder trial of Philadelphian Cristobal Veliz, 58, and Narcy Novack, 55, of Fort Lauderdale.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat, 90, who built a billion-dollar fortune with her late husband's Argentine cement companies and became a leading art collector, died Saturday in her luxury apartment in Buenos Aires. Ms. Fortabat became one of Argentina's wealthiest women at age 54, when her second husband, Alfredo Fortabat, 27 years her senior, died in 1976. At the time, Argentina had just fallen under a dictatorship with close ties to the country's wealthy business elites, and the Loma Negra cement businesses flourished through government contracts with the military junta.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By Karen Zraick, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Cliff Robertson, the handsome movie actor who played John F. Kennedy in PT-109 , won an Oscar for Charly , and was famously victimized in a 1977 Hollywood forgery scandal, died Saturday, the day after his 88th birthday, in Stony Brook, N.Y. Mr. Robertson never rose into the top ranks of leading men, but he remained a popular actor from the mid-1950s into the following century. His later roles included kindly Uncle Ben in the Spider-Man movies. He also gained attention for his second marriage to actress and heiress Dina Merrill, daughter of financier E.F. Hutton and Marjorie Merriweather Post, heiress to the Post cereal fortune and one of the world's richest women.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Philadelphia Daily News
A North Carolina woman who posed as the heiress to a fake $2-billion estate was sentenced to five years in federal prison today for her role in an investment scam. Bari Lynn Berger, 68, of Durham, scammed more than 140 investors-including 40 from Philadelphia-of at least $1.6 million from January 2008 to Jan. 2009. Berger pleaded guilty in December to mail and wire fraud. Investors were told Berger was the illegitimate daughter of a billionaire who did not approve of her lifestyle and stipulated in his will that she had to become financially stable and receive necessary medical care in order to be eligible to receive the nest egg. Victims of the scam - often wealthy, elderly individuals interested in get-rich-quick schemes - were told that if they helped Berger, she would repay them with a "gift" from the estate.
NEWS
May 25, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Huguette Clark, a 104-year-old heiress to a Montana copper fortune who once lived in the largest apartment on New York City's Fifth Avenue, died yesterday at a Manhattan hospital. The reclusive Clark spent the last two decades of her life in New York City hospitals, but Manhattan prosecutors are still pursuing a case over her money and care. "Miss Clark's passing is a sad event for all those who have loved and respected her over the years," her attorney, Wallace Bock, said in a statement.
NEWS
May 25, 2011
Huguette Clark, 104, the heiress to a Montana copper fortune who once lived in the largest apartment on Fifth Avenue, died Tuesday at a Manhattan hospital even as an investigation continues into how her millions were handled. Ms. Clark spent the last two decades of her life in New York hospitals. She died "with dignity and privacy," her attorney, Wallace Bock, said in a statement. The Manhattan district attorney is looking into claims made by Ms. Clark's family that she was kept isolated from almost everyone except Bock and her accountant and that she might not have understood decisions being made related to her fortune.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
As federal prosecutors tell it, a few days before Christmas 2009, Agnes O'Brien emailed Campbell Soup heiress Mary Alice Malone, for whom she once worked as a personal concierge, cook and confidant. The email was titled "When the Soup Boils. " O'Brien told Malone that she was writing a "work of fiction based on [her] personal experience. " O'Brien allegedly wrote in the email that Maggie (the fictional Agnes O'Brien) was "not willing to be victimized . . . after 30 years of loyal service" and that she hoped that the book would "create a lifelong home and security" for her. She later suggested that Malone could avoid being mentioned in the tell-all book by paying her $250,000 a year for life.
NEWS
September 23, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The super-rich got richer, but not so much in the Philadelphia area, according to Forbes' new list of the wealthiest Americans. No new local names joined the four from last year, and the quartet's estimated collective worth was up less than 3 percent. Nationwide, however, the Forbes 400 Richest Americans saw their portfolios bulge by 8 percent, as the cutoff to join the club rose to $1 billion from $950 million. Microsoft founder Bill Gates was still No. 1, but his wealth rose from $50 billion to $54 billion, while investment mogul Warren Buffett, the runnerup again, didn't close the gap enough, as his fortune went from $40 billion to $45 billion.
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