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Heirs

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BUSINESS
October 24, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge in Camden has ordered the holders of the controlling block of stock in Resorts International to appear in court Monday. The group, heirs of late Resorts chairman James M. Crosby, didn't show up at the courthouse yesterday for scheduled preliminary proceedings on a suit filed against them by other Resorts investors. The suit alleges that the defendants gave Resorts' shareholders "deceptive and misleading" information and failed to consider valid offers for their Resorts holdings.
NEWS
February 25, 1994 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A year before he died, Lewis W. Ascah recalled how the big bosses at Crown Cork & Seal would often praise him at board meetings for doing "a good job" as a vice president and director of purchasing. "I was in work at 7:30 in the morning, stayed late, worked Saturdays, and the vast majority of that effort was for Crown Cork & Seal," Ascah testified in a deposition to Crown representatives. By then, his bosses knew that Ascah had taken more than $5.7 million in kickbacks from companies that sold goods and services to Crown, a Philadelphia-based can and container maker with more than 14,000 employees and $2 billion in sales a year.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Joy Gasta, Special to The Inquirer
Pennsbury Township supervisors Monday night gave preliminary approval to a subdivision plan from Harold Haskell, who wants to carve out 3.4 acres from a 1,200-acre tract for his heirs. But the supervisors said final approval would wait until they saw a sketch plan for the entire piece of land. "We have a responsibility to have some idea of what his plans are," said Supervisor William Reynolds, calling the Haskell tract - at Cossart Road and Route 100 - "the most important piece of undeveloped land in the township.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown Township may have to pay as much as $1.25 million more than anticipated for the Darlington tract that it acquired as part of its Project 300 open-space program. A jury of view appointed by Delaware County Court has determined that the 177-acre Darlington tract is worth $2.75 million. The township paid $1.5 million for the property that it condemned in May 1987. "We were disappointed with the figure of $2,750,000 because the township's appraisal was $1.5 million," said council President Larry Hartley.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Mark E. Neumann, Special to The Inquirer
The West Whiteland Board of Supervisors agreed Monday to give up a right of way through a township park so the heirs of Henry Waltz could sell their landlocked property. Harvey and John Waltz, sons of Henry Waltz - after whom the township park is named - agreed to pay $15,000 in exchange for the access way to their 30- acre tract. The Waltz brothers have been trying to sell the land, which was part of their father's estate, since the 1970s. Township manager Steven Ross said the money likely would go to offset some of the cost for relocating two Little League baseball fields in the park.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
It was quiet at 5 p.m. Tuesday in Dallas. So quiet that phones began ringing in Philadelphia a few hours later. The 5 p.m. deadline marked the expiration of a $100-a-share offer by Pratt Hotel Corp. of Dallas - which owns the Sands Casino in Atlantic City - to buy controlling shares in Resorts from the heirs of late Resorts chairman James M. Crosby. The bid could have totaled as much as $109 million for all outstanding Class B shares. "I received no response at all, and it was earth-shattering to think I was treated so cavalierly," said Jack Pratt Sr., Pratt chairman.
NEWS
October 9, 2010 | By Sam Wood and Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writers
A New York real estate tycoon has been ordered by a Bucks County judge to pay $10 million to the heirs of the late Philadelphia landlord Samuel Rappaport. Richard Basciano, a real estate investor the New York Times once called "the undisputed king of Times Square porn," had been close to Rappaport. Before he died in 1994, Rappaport named Basciano the executor of his estate. Rappaport's extensive holdings included the old Philadelphia Saving Fund Society bank on Walnut Street and other vacant and decaying Center City landmarks, former Reading Co. properties, Atlantic City's sewer system, properties on the Boardwalk, parking garages, a Florida resort, and a prime building site adjoining the University of Delaware.
NEWS
June 2, 1995
A battle is brewing in Harrisburg, pitting bankers against folks with trust funds. Hmmm. Hard to know whom to root for: the pinstriped trolls who charge $30 for a bounced check or the Social Register types for whom a financial pinch means the groundskeeper must be let go. Stereotypes aside, there's a real issue here. Some banks do do a lousy job of handling trusts that affluent people set up for relatives and (in many cases) charities. Some banks don't do a great job of investing the funds, or letting beneficiaries know how the trust is doing.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The heirs of the late state Treasurer R. Budd Dwyer could collect a lump sum of $1.2 million from the state pension fund as a death benefit to settle Dwyer's pension claims, according to government sources. The State Employees' Retirement Board, which is scheduled to vote on Dwyer's pension today, was informally told by its attorneys last month that the treasurer's heirs were entitled to his pension despite his conviction in a computer-contract bribery case and his subsequent suicide.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
You can't blame a guy for trying. So, even though Provident National Bank acknowledged that it had no legal right to the cash, the bank risked a 22-cent stamp and wrote Joan Smith asking for $16,000 from her share of an inheritance. Her brothers got similiar letters. In all, Provident asked the heirs of Isidor P. Strittmatter for $48,000 above the fees the bank had agreed to accept for managing a trust set up by their grandfather before his death in 1938. "They must be crazy," said Tony Smith, Joan's husband.
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NEWS
May 14, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writerthompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
A FULL 30 YEARS after "Thunderdome," George Miller returns with a new "Mad Max" and shames any recent movie that claimed to be either fast or furious. "Mad Max: Fury Road" crushes most recent action films under its monster truck wheels, and reminds us what eyeball-scorching marvels his movies were when first we saw them in 1979 and '80. First there was "Mad Max" and its leather-and-mohawk punk energy, which, even in the form of dubbed VHS, made all other biker movies look like commercials for Can-Am trikes.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Melanie Burney, and Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writers
Adamant that the investigation was bungled, Mark Sheridan is preparing to challenge the ruling that his father, Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr., fatally stabbed his wife, set their home on fire, and killed himself. In the coming weeks, Sheridan, a prominent 41-year-old lawyer, plans to file a lawsuit in Superior Court in hopes of changing his father's manner of death, now listed as a suicide. The legal maneuver ventures into rarely charted legal waters in New Jersey - and provides no certainty that the family will prevail in clearing their father's name, experts say. Challenging the finding by the state Medical Examiner's Office and the Somerset County Prosecutor's Office may be not only an arduous task, but lengthy and costly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THE JURY sure didn't see any blurred lines. In Los Angeles, Marvin Gaye 's children were awarded nearly $7.4 million yesterday after a decision that Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams copied their father's music to create "Blurred Lines," the biggest hit song of 2013. Gaye's daughter Nona Gaye wept as the verdict was being read and was hugged by her attorney, Richard Busch . "Right now, I feel free," Nona Gaye said after the verdict. "Free from . . . Pharrell Williams and Robin Thicke's chains and what they tried to keep on us and the lies that were told.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
DEAR HARRY : I'm 93 and in excellent health. I live in a retirement community in the suburbs. My pension (fully funded) and Social Security cover all my expenses and then some. Including my recent inheritance from my deceased wife, my estate is about $11 million. I have been making gifts to my children and grandchildren of $14,000 a year each. You may be wondering why I need free advice. You are objective and fair-minded, and I knew your brother many years ago. My money was made by "aggressive" investing.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
DEAR HARRY : I recently lost my brother. He was unmarried and had no children. I was named to administer his estate. My surviving brother is the only other heir. My deceased brother left substantial money and stock, which are easy to handle. They covered all of the estate's expenses and then some. He also left a house in an affluent area of Montgomery County. The house is not in good repair, and I have been told to rehab it before trying to sell it. The problem is that this will cost about $50,000.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By George R. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Vineland (N.J.) Veterans Memorial Home, assistant business manager William H. Palmer Jr. has a special bond with the 175 or so World War II veterans who live there. His father, Ensign William H. Palmer, was part of a secret mission during the D-Day invasion that delivered messages from the command ship Ancon to the shore during days of radio silence. His father, who was originally trained for one of the rocket boats that pounded the beach right before the troops went in, rode near the beach in a British seaplane tender, then swam the rest of the way. He made several such swims for the first two or three days of the invasion as part of Task Force K of Force O (for Omaha)
NEWS
May 14, 2013
D EAR HARRY: My in-laws are considering making wills for the first time. They had this superstition that making a will meant an imminent death. They have a real problem in that he was married to another woman a long time ago. He had three children from that marriage and two more from his current marriage. He was concerned about some of the things he wanted to do, so he spoke to a friend who works in a bank. My husband wanted to be sure about some of what he was told, so I'm writing to you. My father-in-law wants to leave money only to some of his children, but his friend said that he is required to treat all of his children equally.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
  L   ORNE MICHAELS ' position as the godfather of NBC comedy was solidified yesterday when the network announced that Seth Meyers will move from his job as "Saturday Night Live" head writer and host of "Weekend Update" to replace Jimmy Fallon when Fallon replaces Jay Leno . With this move, Michaels will be the executive in charge of "Late Night," "Tonight" and "Saturday Night Live," which will all originate from New...
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
In even the most functional family, there can be a painful something that triggers a strong emotional response, despite the passage of time. For the Benders, it's the digital camera. "Digital killed the family business," Ben Bender says. Yet digital just might be the route to a family-business revival, as well. Bender has become the region's only franchise owner for TapSnap, a social-media-equipped replacement for the party photo booth. To fully appreciate this cycle of commercial irony - a primary motivator of which was his cancer scare three years ago - a little history is required.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Frank Bajak and Alexandra Olson, Associated Press
CARACAS, Venezuela - Voters chose Sunday between the hand-picked successor who campaigned to carry on Hugo Chavez's self-styled socialist revolution and an emboldened second-time challenger who warned that the late president's regime has Venezuela on the road to ruin. Nicolas Maduro, the longtime foreign minister to Chavez, pinned his hopes on the immense loyalty for his boss among millions of poor beneficiaries of government largesse and the powerful state apparatus that Chavez skillfully consolidated.
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