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Helmet To Helmet

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SPORTS
November 22, 2010
'I'LL BE BACK," Ellis Hobbs said. He was walking out of the Eagles' locker room, flanked by a couple of club employees, wearing a leather jacket and a neck brace. Injured players generally don't do interviews after games, but Hobbs shared those three words with ESPN's Sal Paolantonio early this morning as he moved toward the door. I'll be back. Brave. Hopeful. Football player. Two hours earlier, Hobbs lay face down, not moving, on the turf at Lincoln Financial Field.
SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
With New Orleans poised to score on its opening possession Saturday afternoon, San Francisco's Donte Whitner delivered a crushing blow that knocked out running back Pierre Thomas and forced the first of five Saints turnovers. An army of fans (and bettors) rose up and screamed for a penalty. But the helmet-to-helmet hit by the 49ers safety was legal. Whitner was not penalized because the tackle was not against a defenseless player. Helmet-to-helmet hits are banned against defenseless players in eight categories, and a runner is not one of those categories.
SPORTS
October 19, 2010
WITH THE NFL considering a tougher crackdown on helmet-to-helmet contact, Steelers linebacker James Harrison might want to retract his latest statement: "I try to hurt people. " Harrison laid out Browns receivers Joshua Cribbs and Mohamed Massaquoi with concussion-causing tackles Sunday in Pittsburgh's 28-10 win. "I don't want to injure anybody," Harrison said. "[But] there's a big difference between being hurt and being injured. You get hurt, you shake it off and come back the next series or the next game.
SPORTS
December 8, 2010 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
DeMaurice Smith, the head of the NFL players' union, said Tuesday he plans to meet soon with commissioner Roger Goodell to discuss the NFL's increased fines for helmet-to-helmet hits and the way those sanctions are appealed. The high-level meeting, which Smith said would take place "in the near future," would address a sensitive issue that has grabbed attention league-wide and especially in Philadelphia, where the Eagles have seen players heavily fined, hit, and knocked unconscious on plays that sometimes drew penalties and sometimes did not. "I think it's important that we discuss both the policy, the fines, the amount of the fines, and the manner in which the amounts were determined and the punishment was determined," Smith said at an NFL Players Association event at the Water Works Restaurant and Lounge.
SPORTS
October 17, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
The NFL fined Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis $25,000 yesterday for two separate plays, including a helmet-to-helmet hit on Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chad Ochocinco. The Ravens said Lewis will appeal the fine. Both plays occurred in the fourth quarter of Baltimore's 17-14 loss on Sunday. The league deemed that Lewis "unnecessarily kicked the opponent" and later "unnecessarily struck a defenseless receiver. " During the latter play, Lewis hit Ochocinco after a pass from Carson Palmer sailed incomplete, and the 15-yard penalty for unnecessary roughness helped set up the winning touchdown with 22 seconds remaining.
SPORTS
October 19, 2010 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Suspensions may be the only way With the NFL considering suspensions as the only way to effectively deal with helmet-to-helmet hits, the league got an endorsement from an unexpected quarter. Former Chargers and Patriots all-pro Rodney Harrison, now an analyst for NBC, said he thinks suspensions might be the only way. The only pro ever to have 30 sacks and 30 interceptions was fined more than $200,000 during his career and was suspended for a game in 2002 for a helmet-to-helmet hit. "You didn't get my attention when you fined me 5 grand, 10 grand, 15 grand," he said on the Sunday Night Football pregame show.
SPORTS
October 25, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
NASHVILLE - It used to be that Ernie Sims would be all smiles about the wood he laid on Chris Johnson. He'd consider his job well-done, his hard-hitting reputation burnished. That was last week. Yesterday, Sims flew in from his linebacker spot and crushed Johnson near the Titans' sideline. It was late in the first quarter. It was the signature hit in the Eagles' effort to limit Johnson, the league's No. 2 rusher. The effort worked. Johnson managed 66 yards on 22 carries. The hit might cost Sims dearly.
SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO - With New Orleans poised to score on its opening possession, Donte Whitner delivered a crushing blow that knocked out running back Pierre Thomas and forced the first of five Saints turnovers. San Francisco's hard-hitting, opportunistic defense set the tone in the 49ers' thrilling 36-32 playoff win the same way it has all season. From Justin Smith and Aldon Smith harassing Drew Brees all day, to Patrick Willis and NaVorro Bowman shutting down the running game and Dashon Goldson making punishing hits and key plays from the secondary, the defense is the biggest reason for the resurgence in San Francisco that has the 49ers (14-3)
SPORTS
August 15, 1997 | by Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Writer
Ray Rhodes longs for the days when tacklers could tackle the way they were taught without fear of retribution. The day after Denver linebacker Bill Romanowski was fined $20,000 for a hit that broke the jaw of Carolina quarterback Kerry Collins, Rhodes couldn't help but sympathize with "Romo. " It left the Eagles coach misty for the days before the recent crackdown on helmet-to-helmet hits - the days when he played in the 1970s and in 1980. "Romanowski [might become] a passive football player," Rhodes said of the former Eagle at training camp yesterday.
SPORTS
November 3, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
San Diego Chargers strong safety Rodney Harrison is used to doing the hitting. The NFL hit back yesterday, and Harrison felt singled out. Harrison was fined $40,000 - one of the biggest penalties in NFL history - for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Oakland Raiders tight end Jeremy Brigham on Sunday night. "Obviously it has to be personal, I feel," said a defiant Harrison, who wondered why the NFL was trying to take the violence out of a violent game. It was the seventh time Harrison has been disciplined, and he didn't understand why the amount more than quadrupled since his last fine, $7,500 for a hit on New Orleans quarterback Jeff Blake on Sept.
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SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO - With New Orleans poised to score on its opening possession, Donte Whitner delivered a crushing blow that knocked out running back Pierre Thomas and forced the first of five Saints turnovers. San Francisco's hard-hitting, opportunistic defense set the tone in the 49ers' thrilling 36-32 playoff win the same way it has all season. From Justin Smith and Aldon Smith harassing Drew Brees all day, to Patrick Willis and NaVorro Bowman shutting down the running game and Dashon Goldson making punishing hits and key plays from the secondary, the defense is the biggest reason for the resurgence in San Francisco that has the 49ers (14-3)
SPORTS
January 16, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
With New Orleans poised to score on its opening possession Saturday afternoon, San Francisco's Donte Whitner delivered a crushing blow that knocked out running back Pierre Thomas and forced the first of five Saints turnovers. An army of fans (and bettors) rose up and screamed for a penalty. But the helmet-to-helmet hit by the 49ers safety was legal. Whitner was not penalized because the tackle was not against a defenseless player. Helmet-to-helmet hits are banned against defenseless players in eight categories, and a runner is not one of those categories.
SPORTS
March 17, 2011 | By PAUL DOMOWITCH, pdomo@aol.com
The NFL's crackdown on illegal hits, which resulted in dozens of hefty fines last season, is about to enter Stage 2 of its quest for a safer game. Ray Anderson, executive vice president of football operations for the NFL and the man in charge of punishment for on-field misbehavior, said he won't hesitate to suspend players for illegal hits next fall. While Anderson levied a lot of fines last season for helmet-to-helmet hits and/or hits on defenseless receivers, he didn't issue any suspensions.
SPORTS
December 8, 2010 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
DeMaurice Smith, the head of the NFL players' union, said Tuesday he plans to meet soon with commissioner Roger Goodell to discuss the NFL's increased fines for helmet-to-helmet hits and the way those sanctions are appealed. The high-level meeting, which Smith said would take place "in the near future," would address a sensitive issue that has grabbed attention league-wide and especially in Philadelphia, where the Eagles have seen players heavily fined, hit, and knocked unconscious on plays that sometimes drew penalties and sometimes did not. "I think it's important that we discuss both the policy, the fines, the amount of the fines, and the manner in which the amounts were determined and the punishment was determined," Smith said at an NFL Players Association event at the Water Works Restaurant and Lounge.
SPORTS
November 22, 2010
'I'LL BE BACK," Ellis Hobbs said. He was walking out of the Eagles' locker room, flanked by a couple of club employees, wearing a leather jacket and a neck brace. Injured players generally don't do interviews after games, but Hobbs shared those three words with ESPN's Sal Paolantonio early this morning as he moved toward the door. I'll be back. Brave. Hopeful. Football player. Two hours earlier, Hobbs lay face down, not moving, on the turf at Lincoln Financial Field.
SPORTS
November 12, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
Resolute, and with a bit of bravado, Eagles safety Quintin Mikell swore his game would not change after teammate Ernie Sims was fined $50,000 for a hit in Game 7. Then, Mikell lost his legs. Mikell initially was called for unnecessary roughness against Colts receiver Austin Collie, a hit that knocked Collie out of the game. Mikell hit Collie from the front as fellow safety Kurt Coleman closed from the back side. Coleman's helmet collided with Collie's helmet and the ball flew free.
SPORTS
October 25, 2010 | By MARCUS HAYES, hayesm@phillynews.com
NASHVILLE - It used to be that Ernie Sims would be all smiles about the wood he laid on Chris Johnson. He'd consider his job well-done, his hard-hitting reputation burnished. That was last week. Yesterday, Sims flew in from his linebacker spot and crushed Johnson near the Titans' sideline. It was late in the first quarter. It was the signature hit in the Eagles' effort to limit Johnson, the league's No. 2 rusher. The effort worked. Johnson managed 66 yards on 22 carries. The hit might cost Sims dearly.
SPORTS
October 24, 2010 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The violence is understood. Few, if any, players enter the National Football League without knowing the risks. Broken bones. Head trauma. Torn ligaments. Collateral damage accompanies the big paychecks. So when the NFL announced last week that it will now punish players who make illegal hits with harsher fines and suspensions, many defensive players claimed the league was trying to rid the game of one of its greatest attributes: aggression. It is, after all, a $9 billion business built on violence.
SPORTS
October 22, 2010 | by Paul Domowitch
EVERY FEW YEARS or so, after a particularly vicious hit or two gets national attention, the suits that run the NFL love to grab a bullhorn and announce that they're going to crack down on unnecessary violence in their very violent, $9 billion-a-year game. That almost always is followed by a chorus of boos from defensive players who accuse the suits of trying to turn the game into - to borrow a term from the drill sergeant-turned-therapist in the Geico commercial - mambypambyland. So it was again this week after the league handed out $175,000 in fines to Steelers linebacker James Harrison , Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather and Falcons cornerback Dunta Robinson . The league said it will be "enforcing discipline at a higher level" for illegal hits on defenseless players.
SPORTS
October 19, 2010 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Suspensions may be the only way With the NFL considering suspensions as the only way to effectively deal with helmet-to-helmet hits, the league got an endorsement from an unexpected quarter. Former Chargers and Patriots all-pro Rodney Harrison, now an analyst for NBC, said he thinks suspensions might be the only way. The only pro ever to have 30 sacks and 30 interceptions was fined more than $200,000 during his career and was suspended for a game in 2002 for a helmet-to-helmet hit. "You didn't get my attention when you fined me 5 grand, 10 grand, 15 grand," he said on the Sunday Night Football pregame show.
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