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LIVING
April 12, 1987 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
While some women may wring their hands, men the world over will cheer fashion's latest rage: short skirts. Rarely have European and American designers been so united in their commitment to the current trend to above-the-knee lengths. With a few longer exceptions, the skirts that appeared in the New York fall collections that ended Friday climbed from midknee to midthigh. The '60s mini has been given a new lease on life in the '80s. For those of you who shudder at the thought of rummaging through the closets of Fashion Past and dredging up Mary Quant minis and fishnet stockings, pay no mind.
NEWS
March 15, 1988
America's fashion moguls have finally acknowledged that their attempts to resurrect the miniskirt have fallen as flat as yesterday's souffle. "People aren't dictated to anymore," sniffed one major designer. "Some women got very belligerent. " Small wonder when they were told to clean out the closets just because Seventh Avenue decreed the year of the knee. Short-short may be fine for a skinny 22-year-old on a Saturday night. But most women have neither the shape nor the inclination to follow such fashion commands.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Is America heading for a serious recession? Short skirts are hot on the fashion scene, but then, there was no snow on the ground in Boston last Christmas. What do snow and skirts have to do with it? Well, in the minds of some, those are "economic indicators" just as much as such traditional measures as housing starts, employment figures and the gross national product. If you have been following recent government pronouncements, you know that the official signals on the economy are mixed.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Karl Lagerfeld, the world's high-fashion heavyweight champion, entered the fall ready-to-wear arena yesterday, aiming to prove that his dominance of the industry is indisputable. Ignoring the reservations of retail buyers and some fashion writers, the ever headstrong Lagerfeld came out swinging for the Chanel collection with a line that did not feature any hemlines above the knee. From hip-hugging leather skirts to fluid knit dresses and light-as-a-cloud chiffon skirts, Lagerfeld's hemlines grazed the ankles.
LIVING
November 2, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The election season brings out the tracking polls and the pundits, the gadflies and the gurus. How does one predict who will be the new president in the most hotly contested race in decades? "Most models look at GDP [gross domestic product] growth and favor the party in power," says Robert Boatright, a political science professor at Swarthmore College. For the moment, let's forget about GDP and models and polls that have margins of error of plus or minus X percentage points if the moon is in the 7th house and Jupiter aligns with Mars.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Fashion Writer
A model came down the runway of the Valentino show last week wearing a long skirt, unbuttoned to the thigh. At the end of the runway, as she faced a throng of fashion photographers, she whipped off the skirt to reveal a minidress with a lace hemline. At Karl Lagerfeld's show a day later, former Guess? model Claudia Schiffer sauntered down the catwalk in a tight black skirt that nearly reached her ankles. Upon her exit turn, it was revealed that the skirt featured a gold zipper that unzipped from the hemline to reveal plenty of leg. And so it went throughout the spring ready-to-wear collections here, which concluded Wednesday.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
OK, women: You've stocked your closet with short skirts, dresses and suits with abbreviated hemlines. Some of you even took your old long skirts to the seamstress and let her update your wardrobe. And now the American designers are declaring long form-fitting skirts, many with slits up to there, as the new look for next fall. On top of that, they are presenting this so-called new look in a retro 1940s way, with jackets - fitted and belted - and hemlines that are nearly ankle-length.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1992 | JUANA ANDERSON/DAILY NEWS
Designer Donna Karan opened a 150,000-square-foot boutique in the Tribout Department of the John Wanamaker Center City store yesterday. Some of her fall collection was modeled in a "Trunk Show" at the store. One of the people who stopped by was Denise Higginbotham (above), who checked out next season's hemlines.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
ILL WIND BLOWS GOOD? Could the answer to AIDS and cancer be blowing in the wind? Well, Hurricane Andrew's devastation of the world's largest collection of rare palms and related plants at the Fairchild Tropical Garden in Miami has provided a unique opportunity to search for new cancer and AIDS drugs. The National Cancer Institute has dispatched a research team in a race to collect samples from downed palms before they decompose. PET THEORY Pet owners, you are less likely to suffer from heart disease than people who don't own any animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Above-the-knee hemlines are so, well - over. This spring, fashion is teeming with skirts and dresses mid-calf and longer. Floor-grazing bohemian styles are elegant, either belted or flowing. Prissy A-lines are best with sheer, contrasting tanks and fitted punch-colored cardigans. Wear a silken, pleated skirt - even one with an asymmetrical hemline - and you will own the lengthy look. "It's refreshing to see hemlines come down," said Meredith Melling Burke, senior market editor at Vogue magazine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - If spring 2015's runway looks - shown last September - were all about pared down, futuristic silhouettes, expect this fall's fashions to take you on a journey to outer space. At this year's Fall Fashion Week, ending Thursday in New York, three-quarter length skirts and cocoon coats have been both cozy and commanding. Expect to see midriff top and matching skirt (or pant) ensembles - also among the week's top looks - trending from spring into fall. It seems the higher-waisted - and the skinnier - the pants, the better, but mini bell bottoms will likely replace those tapered at the ankles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
I'm checking the mail every day, waiting for a gorgeous ivory envelope of considerable heft to fall out of the mailbox. And there, in perfect script, will be my invitation to the Academy Awards. I deserve it. As someone who papered her childhood room with pictures of movie stars, and who more recently has plunked down unconscionable admission prices to see movies of questionable merit, I think it's payback time. So I stand ready to take my seat at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times
She hosted the opening festivities for L.A.'s Fashion's Night Out in September and sat in the front row at the Louis Vuitton runway show in Paris last month. Come February, she'll be in our living rooms every week, as a mentor on NBC's new Fashion Star designer competition series. Is tabloid sensation-turned-designer Nicole Richie poised to become the next big celebrity fashion brand? Following in the footsteps of Jessica Simpson and Rachel Zoe, Richie, 30 - whose adoptive father is Lionel Richie - launched her House of Harlow 1960 jewelry line in late 2007, adding shoes in 2009 and bags in June 2011.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
NAILSEA, England - Thanks to the movies, Americans who have never set foot in this country have a fair idea of what British schoolchildren look like. From Harry Potter and his pals at Hogwarts to the glowing-eyed demon spawn of the '60s horror classic Village of the Damned , the image is one of boys and girls neatly turned out in their matching school sweaters, trousers, skirts, and ties. But for some of today's nonmagical, non-mutant students, a key piece of that picture is missing.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Above-the-knee hemlines are so, well - over. This spring, fashion is teeming with skirts and dresses mid-calf and longer. Floor-grazing bohemian styles are elegant, either belted or flowing. Prissy A-lines are best with sheer, contrasting tanks and fitted punch-colored cardigans. Wear a silken, pleated skirt - even one with an asymmetrical hemline - and you will own the lengthy look. "It's refreshing to see hemlines come down," said Meredith Melling Burke, senior market editor at Vogue magazine.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Minimalism is about to replace yesteryear's exaggerated shapes in what may be the most trendsetting season since the recession began. It's as if the 100-plus designers showcasing their collections this week at Lincoln Center are reestablishing themselves as leaders. The result? A spring 2011 with major direction. The runways at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week have been chock-full of soft silhouettes: capped-sleeve dresses cinched at the waist and trousers with higher waists and a standard leg (not too skinny, not too wide)
NEWS
April 16, 2002 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber FOR THE INQUIRER
If there's anything in fashion she hates, designer Carolina Herrera says, it's excess. In clothing, in jewelry, in makeup. In anything, really. In her latest collection, for fall 2002, she uses a touch of luxe here, a dash of glam there, but never goes over the line. She was inspired by the provocative photographs of Helmut Newton, hence the seamed stockings and very fitted leather coatdresses. Herrera has reinvented the tuxedo, and declares the suit is back. "I love suits," she said in presenting the collection here Thursday, in a benefit for Children's Hospital of Philadelphia at the Park Hyatt that was sponsored by Saks Fifth Avenue.
LIVING
November 2, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The election season brings out the tracking polls and the pundits, the gadflies and the gurus. How does one predict who will be the new president in the most hotly contested race in decades? "Most models look at GDP [gross domestic product] growth and favor the party in power," says Robert Boatright, a political science professor at Swarthmore College. For the moment, let's forget about GDP and models and polls that have margins of error of plus or minus X percentage points if the moon is in the 7th house and Jupiter aligns with Mars.
NEWS
September 3, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
It didn't seem all that ominous at the time. But now it appears somebody should have said something last spring when such high-powered fashion designers as Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, Linda Allard and Carolina Herrera were all saying that the "in" skirt for fall would end either at mid-calf or the ankles. Somebody should have said something like: "OH NOOOOOOOO. " Or: "Quick! Get the scissors!" Don't these designers know about the Hemline Theory of the Stock Market? It holds that stock prices go up and down with the rise and fall of the hemline in women's skirts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1996 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Oh, that Calvin Klein. He knows how to play to his strengths. On Friday, the last day of the weeklong American spring designer collections, Klein continued his minimalist ways. His stunning, original collection, mostly in black, tomato red, ultra-violet and white, was far more imaginative than the classics he once did to the point of boredom. His sheer black dresses featured hemlines longer in the back or at the side. He showed them over slip dresses in metallic shades of wine and purple.
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