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NEWS
April 25, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Radio preacher Ralph Gordon Stair prefers to be known as Brother R.G. Stair. "I don't like Ralph. It just doesn't sound like a preacher to me," he said last week. Stair, who usually wears casual trousers and an open shirt, is the 54-year- old founder of the fundamentalist Faith Cathedral Fellowship in Walterboro, S.C., and is a preacher who buys radio time on about 50 stations nationwide to deliver his message that nuclear destruction is imminent. He claims there will be nuclear devastation by year's end, that President Reagan will not finish his term of office, and that the world will end by the year 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Steinbeck is April's author in the limelight. His Pulitzer Prize- winning The Grapes of Wrath, considered by some to be the greatest American novel ever written, was published 50 years ago this month. If you don't have time to read the whole book or see the 1940 movie starring Henry Fonda - or even if you do - try listening to Fonda reading excerpts from the book on a one-hour tape just re-released by Caedmon ($9.95). Fonda, born and raised in Nebraska, has a voice so undeniably American that it seems like the story was written for him. He moves through the lines of both the narrator and the characters with consummate ease.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Tracy and Hepburn growling and snapping at each other. Henry Fonda keeping a firm grip on his reasonable doubt. John Houseman sticking it to his students. James Stewart tinkling the ivories with Duke Ellington. Welcome, believe it or not, to "Hollywood Looks at Law," the Philadelphia Museum of Art's month-long series of American films devoted to ways of seeking or administrating justice. The series begins tommorow with "Adam's Rib," the 1949 George Cukor comedy boasting a juicy screenplay by Garson Kanin and Ruth Gordon and starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn as a husband-wife lawyer couple on opposite sides in an attempted murder.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Last night's Stage 10 Live was a reasonably effective wallow in nostalgia. Philadelphia native Jack Klugman was foremost among the actors who re-created scenes from the 1955 TV adaptation of Robert E. Sherwood's play The Petrified Forest. The hour was supplemented by the reminiscences of various actors about the "golden age" of television drama in the '50s. The excuse for this blast from the past was Channel 10's ongoing celebration of its 40 years of broadcasting. This was an ambitious effort on the part of WCAU-TV, which might have been content to show us simply a lot of self-congratulatory film clips of its past.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In 1984, Sergio Leone made a 226-minute gangster epic called Once Upon a Time in America that became a cause celebre when it was released here in a drastically cut version. The Italian director was immediately labelled a martyr to crass Hollywood bottom-liners, but the truth was that the cuts simply rendered an interminable movie incomprehensible. In making several wounded speeches about what Ladd Co. executives had done to more than an hour of his movie, Leone could cite a precedent from his own career.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
JANE FONDA just won't shut up. And her crocodile tears will not stop flowing. She has contracted an acute case of Aging Celebrity Hippie Syndrome - and it's going to land her tell-all memoir on the New York Times best-seller list in no time. There she is on "60 Minutes," simpering about her failed relationship with her stoic father. There she is in the Washington Post, detailing her bouts with bulimia and lingering body image problems. (Which haven't damaged her enough to prevent her from posing for publicity photos: "Oh, God!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1998 | By Michael E. Hill, WASHINGTON POST The New York Daily News contributed to this report
On Sunday, two actors well-known for television series work - Rob Morrow in Northern Exposure and Lance Henriksen in Millennium - team up to play assassin and victim. The telemovie is The Day Lincoln Was Shot (8 p.m. on TNT), and Morrow's portrayal of John Wilkes Booth may do a bit to tidy up the image of that actor/zealot. It's not that Morrow puts a pretty face on the man who shot Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in the waning days of the Civil War. But he does give Booth an actor's flair and swagger.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1988 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ever since Ernest Thompson abandoned his acting career to try his hand at plays and screenplays, he's been writing about relationships. He hasn't done too badly. His first screenplay was On Golden Pond, the wrenching, heartwarming story of an elderly man (Henry Fonda) facing his own mortality with the help of his loving wife (Katharine Hepburn) while trying to patch up his relationship with his estranged daughter (Jane Fonda). For his efforts, Thompson won an Oscar. The film grossed more than $100 million.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Uytendale Caner, 93, a socialite acclaimed in the 1920s for her acting ability and her elegance, died Sunday at the Quadrangle in Haverford. In a professional acting career that began in 1924 and continued until the late 1930s, Mrs. Caner performed on stage with Nelson Eddy, Henry Fonda, Frederic March, Burgess Meredith, Robert Montgomery - who taught her two daughters to swim - and Peggy Wood. Newspapers regularly referred to her as one of Philadelphia's most beautiful women.
NEWS
December 29, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
By his own abstemious estimate, Sidney Lumet has been drunk perhaps three times, yet his two best films of the '80s have been awash in booze. In The Verdict (1982), Paul Newman's Frank Galvin was a soused lawyer called too often to the bar before he finally took a stand in a malpractice suit. And in the just released The Morning After, none other than the high priestess of health, Jane Fonda, drowns her many sorrows in vodka in the role of an alcoholic actress mixed up in a murder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Carrie Rickey and For the Inquirer
That svelte elder-babe hugging Catherine Keener in Peace, Love, & Misunderstanding? Why, it's Jane Fonda, for much of her career the Silent Generation's most outspoken member. During the 1970s and '80s, Fonda's topical films crystallized her public efforts on behalf of soldiers returning from Vietnam (Coming Home) and working women (Nine to Five). Though the workplace comedy made more than $100 million at a time when that was rare, Fonda's most popular film in the era when she scored Oscars for Klute and Coming Home was On Golden Pond (1981)
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
JANE FONDA just won't shut up. And her crocodile tears will not stop flowing. She has contracted an acute case of Aging Celebrity Hippie Syndrome - and it's going to land her tell-all memoir on the New York Times best-seller list in no time. There she is on "60 Minutes," simpering about her failed relationship with her stoic father. There she is in the Washington Post, detailing her bouts with bulimia and lingering body image problems. (Which haven't damaged her enough to prevent her from posing for publicity photos: "Oh, God!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1998 | By Michael E. Hill, WASHINGTON POST The New York Daily News contributed to this report
On Sunday, two actors well-known for television series work - Rob Morrow in Northern Exposure and Lance Henriksen in Millennium - team up to play assassin and victim. The telemovie is The Day Lincoln Was Shot (8 p.m. on TNT), and Morrow's portrayal of John Wilkes Booth may do a bit to tidy up the image of that actor/zealot. It's not that Morrow puts a pretty face on the man who shot Lincoln at Ford's Theatre in the waning days of the Civil War. But he does give Booth an actor's flair and swagger.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Uytendale Caner, 93, a socialite acclaimed in the 1920s for her acting ability and her elegance, died Sunday at the Quadrangle in Haverford. In a professional acting career that began in 1924 and continued until the late 1930s, Mrs. Caner performed on stage with Nelson Eddy, Henry Fonda, Frederic March, Burgess Meredith, Robert Montgomery - who taught her two daughters to swim - and Peggy Wood. Newspapers regularly referred to her as one of Philadelphia's most beautiful women.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Steinbeck is April's author in the limelight. His Pulitzer Prize- winning The Grapes of Wrath, considered by some to be the greatest American novel ever written, was published 50 years ago this month. If you don't have time to read the whole book or see the 1940 movie starring Henry Fonda - or even if you do - try listening to Fonda reading excerpts from the book on a one-hour tape just re-released by Caedmon ($9.95). Fonda, born and raised in Nebraska, has a voice so undeniably American that it seems like the story was written for him. He moves through the lines of both the narrator and the characters with consummate ease.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1988 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ever since Ernest Thompson abandoned his acting career to try his hand at plays and screenplays, he's been writing about relationships. He hasn't done too badly. His first screenplay was On Golden Pond, the wrenching, heartwarming story of an elderly man (Henry Fonda) facing his own mortality with the help of his loving wife (Katharine Hepburn) while trying to patch up his relationship with his estranged daughter (Jane Fonda). For his efforts, Thompson won an Oscar. The film grossed more than $100 million.
NEWS
September 8, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Last night's Stage 10 Live was a reasonably effective wallow in nostalgia. Philadelphia native Jack Klugman was foremost among the actors who re-created scenes from the 1955 TV adaptation of Robert E. Sherwood's play The Petrified Forest. The hour was supplemented by the reminiscences of various actors about the "golden age" of television drama in the '50s. The excuse for this blast from the past was Channel 10's ongoing celebration of its 40 years of broadcasting. This was an ambitious effort on the part of WCAU-TV, which might have been content to show us simply a lot of self-congratulatory film clips of its past.
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Radio preacher Ralph Gordon Stair prefers to be known as Brother R.G. Stair. "I don't like Ralph. It just doesn't sound like a preacher to me," he said last week. Stair, who usually wears casual trousers and an open shirt, is the 54-year- old founder of the fundamentalist Faith Cathedral Fellowship in Walterboro, S.C., and is a preacher who buys radio time on about 50 stations nationwide to deliver his message that nuclear destruction is imminent. He claims there will be nuclear devastation by year's end, that President Reagan will not finish his term of office, and that the world will end by the year 2000.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Tracy and Hepburn growling and snapping at each other. Henry Fonda keeping a firm grip on his reasonable doubt. John Houseman sticking it to his students. James Stewart tinkling the ivories with Duke Ellington. Welcome, believe it or not, to "Hollywood Looks at Law," the Philadelphia Museum of Art's month-long series of American films devoted to ways of seeking or administrating justice. The series begins tommorow with "Adam's Rib," the 1949 George Cukor comedy boasting a juicy screenplay by Garson Kanin and Ruth Gordon and starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn as a husband-wife lawyer couple on opposite sides in an attempted murder.
NEWS
December 29, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
By his own abstemious estimate, Sidney Lumet has been drunk perhaps three times, yet his two best films of the '80s have been awash in booze. In The Verdict (1982), Paul Newman's Frank Galvin was a soused lawyer called too often to the bar before he finally took a stand in a malpractice suit. And in the just released The Morning After, none other than the high priestess of health, Jane Fonda, drowns her many sorrows in vodka in the role of an alcoholic actress mixed up in a murder.
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