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Henry Nicholas

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BUSINESS
August 6, 2006 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hometown: Philadelphia. Union: American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, Council 1199C. Affiliation: AFL-CIO. Background: Nicholas began his labor career in 1956. He represents 17,000 hospital workers locally who are members of Council 1199C. He is also an international vice president of AFSCME and president of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees. Nicholas was recently elected executive vice president of the national Coalition of Black Trade Unionists.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry Nicholas smiled as he sat in the pulpit at Canaan Baptist Church yesterday and heard dozens of speakers, many of them elected officials, praise him for his work as a labor leader and a community activist. Three hours into a tribute organized by a group of ministers, the man of the hour rose. Nicholas graciously thanked his admirers and then challenged them to prove how much they respected him. Nicholas, president of District 1199C of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Workers, said that he was launching a mentoring program, and he put officials on notice that he would be calling on them to make contributions.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Henry Nicholas, a well-known labor leader and poltiical activist, has learned the meaning of the old saying, If you want a job done right, do it yourself. Or maybe he just can't get anybody else to do the job. Nicholas said he's pretty sure he's going to run as an independent in the mayor's race. "I believe the people need something to vote for in November," he said. On Tuesday, he changed his voter registration from Democrat to independent. He has until August to file for the election.
NEWS
June 12, 1997 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A panel of Philadelphia judges is trying to determine why Henry Nicholas, a prominent union leader and political activist, was arraigned and freed in about half the normal time after his arrest for an act of civil disobedience tied to the recent Presidents' Summit on volunteerism. Nicholas, president of the Hospital and Health Workers union, was released from a holding cell 10 hours after his arrest April 30, after a Democratic ward leader and other supporters called a bail commissioner on his behalf and a top city prosecutor said he had no objection to a speedy release.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The campaign that never got started is over. Labor leader Henry Nicholas said yesterday that he would not run for mayor as an independent candidate in the general election. Nicholas, who last week summoned the media and supporters to a news conference where he was expected to announce his candidacy, revealed his final decision by fax in a one-page statement. Nicholas, in a brief interview yesterday, said he would support neither Democratic Mayor Rendell nor Republican M. Joseph Rocks in the November election.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Four twenty-seven! . . . 115!! . . . 427!!! . . . 115!!!! . . . 427!!!!!!" The flimsy gray partitions in the Wyndham Franklin Plaza, designed to mute the soft cocktail-party sounds of developers and accountants, are flexing in and out like a bass drum. The municipal trash workers of Local 427 and the Teamsters of Local 115 are gathered for a parliamentary discussion - what, are they kidding? - of issues relating to the campaign for mayor of Philadelphia, particularly privatization, which to a lot of union guys means They're Gonna Take My Job. Then someone throws a chair.
REAL_ESTATE
August 16, 1992 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Henry Nicholas could lift his house on his shoulders and carry it down to Society Hill, he thinks it would be worth at least $300,000. But Nicholas' late-19th-century mansion, designed by architect Wilson Eyre, is in North Philadelphia. It cost him $10,000. Because of where it is, he said, no bank was willing to give him a mortgage even for that small sum when he bought the place in 1983. And these are the same banks, he said, that handle millions of dollars in business from the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees Local 1199C, the city's second-largest union, which he founded and has run since 1974.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's name will not appear on the May 19 primary election ballot, Commonwealth Court ruled Thursday. The court rejected Singer's appeal of a Common Pleas Court ruling March 30 striking her name from the ballot. Singer needed at least 1,000 signatures from registered Democrats on nomination petitions to be listed on the ballot. She filed 1,485 but a review during a legal challenge found that just 996 were valid. That left her four names short in her bid for a second four-year term.
NEWS
May 1, 1997 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Henry Nicholas (above center) of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, is arrested yesterday at 2nd Street and Germantown Avenue. He and other protesters, members of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union, cleaned up a park and planned to set up shacks to live in. Cheri Honkala (left), director of the Kensington group, is led to police van.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the dirt-floor doorway of a Mississippi sharecropper's home built of logs chinked with Spanish moss, a little boy, no more than 4, clung to his father's leg, terrified. "At least several times, I observed my father standing in the door when the Ku Klux Klan with hoods on came to get him," said Henry Nicholas, the labor leader. "With me hanging on his leg, he would cock the gun and tell them to make their moves, and he'd stare them down until they rode away. "That never, ever left me. My father wasn't afraid, but I was. He wasn't scared, but I was scared to death.
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NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas and Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writers
City Commissioner Stephanie Singer says she's giving up her reelection campaign, even as her lawyer continues the court fight to get her name back on the ballot. During a Monday morning rally at National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees Local 1199 headquarters, Singer said a victory in the May 19 primary was out of reach. "This is an election I can no longer win," said Singer, one of the three elected commissioners who oversee the city's elections. "I'm going to keep fighting for what's right.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's name will not appear on the May 19 primary election ballot, Commonwealth Court ruled Thursday. The court rejected Singer's appeal of a Common Pleas Court ruling March 30 striking her name from the ballot. Singer needed at least 1,000 signatures from registered Democrats on nomination petitions to be listed on the ballot. She filed 1,485 but a review during a legal challenge found that just 996 were valid. That left her four names short in her bid for a second four-year term.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Airplane cabin cleaners at Philadelphia International Airport employed by subcontractors rallied outside Terminal B on Wednesday, seeking safer procedures to protect "front line" workers against infectious diseases, including Ebola. Tommy Rodney, a cabin cleaner and supervisor in the international terminal, said his employer, Prospect Aviation Services Inc., gives workers latex gloves that rip easily, and no training on exposure to waste and bodily fluids in cleaning aircraft bathrooms, removing trash, wiping down tray tables, and digging through seat pockets and cushions.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AFTER threatening a strike, the leader of Philly's prison-healthcare-workers union has reached a tentative agreement with the company that manages treatment for the city's roughly 9,000 inmates, sources with knowledge of the negotiations said. Henry Nicholas, president of the National Union of Hospital & Health Care Employees District 1199C, is expected to present to his 270 prison workers a compromise that will include wage increases and less-generous health-care plans. If approved, the agreement would avert a strike threatened in an op-ed by Nicholas in yesterday's Inquirer . Nicholas and representatives of Corizon, a Tennessee company that the city pays $42 million per year to manage the city's prison health care, spent hours yesterday in the offices of Everett Gillison, Mayor Nutter's chief of staff.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifty years ago, when he was a 26-year-old union organizer in New York, Henry Nicholas led 5,000 hospital workers to Washington, where they would hear the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. grip the nation's attention with one of history's greatest speeches. "We were one of the biggest infrastructures at the last march," he recalled this week. "I was closing in on my 27th birthday. " Now president of AFSCME District 1199C, Nicholas and more than 40 buses filled with union members and their families will return to Washington on Saturday for what organizers described as a "continuation" of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THEY ARE old now, those still living who were among the hundreds of thousands on the National Mall that August afternoon in 1963 when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. energized a movement. But they do not forget. Here are memories from three Philadelphians who attended the March on Washington. Henry Nicholas The president of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees was a 27-year-old attendant at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City in 1963. He led the charge to bring 5,000 members of his hospital workers union, AFSCME's District 1199C, by train to Washington, the largest turnout of any single group.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of the union that represents health-care employees at Temple University Hospital on Sunday threatened a strike over an arbitration dispute involving a terminated employee accused of sexual harassment. "We're prepared to shut it down," said Henry Nicholas, president of AFSCME District 1199C, which represents hospital employees across the city. There's almost no chance, union representatives said, of an actual strike - the union contract contains a no-strike clause. But for its president to even mention a strike - at a hospital that has historically enjoyed a strong, amicable relationship with its union - shows how upset the union has become over the arbitration dispute.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longtime labor leader Henry Nicholas, 76, has no plans to retire and said he's never had a tired day in his life. "I'm a lucky guy," he said. Even so, Nicholas has been consciously grooming a successor to lead District 1199C, the 11,358-member hospital workers' union for employees in dozens of the region's nursing homes and most of Philadelphia's major hospitals. "The character of a leader is to make sure that when he can't lead, someone else can," Nicholas said. "I have an obligation.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the dirt-floor doorway of a Mississippi sharecropper's home built of logs chinked with Spanish moss, a little boy, no more than 4, clung to his father's leg, terrified. "At least several times, I observed my father standing in the door when the Ku Klux Klan with hoods on came to get him," said Henry Nicholas, the labor leader. "With me hanging on his leg, he would cock the gun and tell them to make their moves, and he'd stare them down until they rode away. "That never, ever left me. My father wasn't afraid, but I was. He wasn't scared, but I was scared to death.
NEWS
July 1, 2012
Union leaders representing some 1,400 workers at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital braced for a possible strike Saturday night as an 11:30 p.m. deadline neared with no contract from a marathon bargaining session. "We are not close," said Henry Nicholas, who, as president of District 1199C of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, represents licensed practical nurses, hospital escorts, nurses' assistants, kitchen staff, and other unionized support workers at Jefferson, in Center City.
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