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Hepatitis B Virus

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NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Hee-Soon Juon asked her physician a few years ago whether she needed to be screened for exposure to the Hepatitis B virus, he told her, "You don't need to be. You're in the U.S.A. " But Hepatitis B is widespread in Asian and sub-Saharan African countries, including Juon's native South Korea, and many immigrants have brought it with them to the United States. Getting out the word is critical for two reasons: First, there is a vaccine to prevent transmission of the virus. Second, those who have already contracted it should seek early treatment to prevent potentially deadly consequences.
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Baruch S. Blumberg were not a Nobel Prize winner, his research methods might seem a bit eccentric. Whenever he travels, the 62-year-old scientist scours dilapidated parking lots, muddy riverbanks and overgrown jungles in search of obscure plants used in folk medicines. He has trekked in the Himalayas of Nepal, hiked in tiger- infested forests in India and foraged for weeds in remote areas of Canada, France and Korea. "Some might see this as a bit quirky," Blumberg said during an interview at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Baruch S. Blumberg, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, will become head of an Oxford University college where he once studied and taught, Fox Chase officials said yesterday. Blumberg, 62, will take over as master at Balliol College in Oxford, England, in October 1989 after the current master, Anthony Kenny, steps down. He will continue his affiliation with Fox Chase as a senior scientist and collaborator on continuing research projects, officials said.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
BLITZEN AND NIXON Looking for that elusive holiday gift for the friend who has everything? How about a T-shirt with a picture of former President Richard Nixon shaking hands with rock-and-roll king Elvis Presley? Or, for the sportsman, how about golf balls imprinted with Nixon's signature? These and other "exclusive originals" are available at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Birthplace in Yorba Linda, Calif. NO SWEAT Don't sweat it: The virus that causes AIDS is not passed on through perspiration, a new study has found.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward D. Lustbader, 49, a scientist who was a member of the research team at Fox Chase Cancer Center that helped identify the hepatitis B virus, died Thursday of cancer at Abington Hospital. The research helped win a Nobel Prize for Dr. Baruch S. Blumberg. Dr. Lustbader, a researcher specializing in biostatistics and general epidemiology who joined the Cancer Center in 1972, developed and used statistical methods to look for causes of cancer. "Ed had a very unusual and original mind, and was never satisfiedwith routine solutions," said Dr. Blumberg.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Edward D. Lustbader, a member of the Fox Chase Cancer Center research team that won the Nobel Prize for identifying the role that hepatitis B virus plays in cancer, died Thursday after a year-long battle against cancer. He was 49 and a resident of Maple Glen, Montgomery County. "Ed had a very unusual and original mind and was never satisfied with the routine solutions. He was constantly searching and finding individualized approaches to problems," recalled Nobel laureate Dr. Baruch S. Blumberg.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
For the last five years, the Fox Chase Cancer Center of Northeast Philadelphia has been trying to bring South Jersey's Asian populations a message of life or death importance: They are at high risk for the incurable hepatitis B virus, which causes more than 80 percent of all liver cancer cases in the world. Through Asian churches, schools and local doctors, the cancer center has been encouraging Asian-Americans to go for free screening and check-ups at the Fox Chase center in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cure for some people suffering from hepatitis B, a deadly liver disease that affects more than 250 million people worldwide, has been discovered by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and 11 other medical centers. Daily injections of interferon alpha, a human protein manufactured through genetic-engineering techniques, eliminated all symptoms of hepatitis B in about one-third of the patients who were given interferon over a four-month period, the researchers found. In addition, all traces of the hepatitis B virus disappeared in about 10 percent of the people who were given the protein, according to the study, which is in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By Helen Ouyang At age 33, I outlived my father this year. He died when he was only 32. I was 3 years old and my brother was 5. My father was diagnosed with liver cancer on Halloween. On Thanksgiving Day, my mother was a widow. He first complained of fatigue in September of that year. Then he noticed his urine was the color of tea. At first, no doctor at our local hospital in New Jersey could pinpoint the diagnosis. But as soon as my grandmother heard his symptoms, she knew he had liver cancer - she had already lost another son to the same disease.
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NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Hee-Soon Juon asked her physician a few years ago whether she needed to be screened for exposure to the Hepatitis B virus, he told her, "You don't need to be. You're in the U.S.A. " But Hepatitis B is widespread in Asian and sub-Saharan African countries, including Juon's native South Korea, and many immigrants have brought it with them to the United States. Getting out the word is critical for two reasons: First, there is a vaccine to prevent transmission of the virus. Second, those who have already contracted it should seek early treatment to prevent potentially deadly consequences.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
By Helen Ouyang At age 33, I outlived my father this year. He died when he was only 32. I was 3 years old and my brother was 5. My father was diagnosed with liver cancer on Halloween. On Thanksgiving Day, my mother was a widow. He first complained of fatigue in September of that year. Then he noticed his urine was the color of tea. At first, no doctor at our local hospital in New Jersey could pinpoint the diagnosis. But as soon as my grandmother heard his symptoms, she knew he had liver cancer - she had already lost another son to the same disease.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Irving Millman, 88, a microbiologist who helped develop the first hepatitis B vaccine while working at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, died of natural causes April 17 at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He had lived in the nation's capital for the last decade. In the 1960s, Dr. Millman collaborated with researcher Dr. Baruch Blumberg in the latter's laboratory at the cancer center to create the vaccine, which is credited with saving millions of lives worldwide.
SPORTS
December 2, 2009 | By Chris Melchiorre and Pat Maguire INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Villanova freshman basketball player Mouphtaou Yarou has tested positive for the hepatitis B virus and could miss four to six months. Yarou, a 6-foot-10 freshman from Benin, West Africa, is being treated under the supervision of team doctor Frank Furman. "Nobody really wanted to come out and say what it was," Villanova coach Jay Wright said yesterday. "It's kind of weird to everyone. " Villanova doctors first noticed irregularities in Yarou's blood tests when he enrolled at the school.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward D. Lustbader, 49, a scientist who was a member of the research team at Fox Chase Cancer Center that helped identify the hepatitis B virus, died Thursday of cancer at Abington Hospital. The research helped win a Nobel Prize for Dr. Baruch S. Blumberg. Dr. Lustbader, a researcher specializing in biostatistics and general epidemiology who joined the Cancer Center in 1972, developed and used statistical methods to look for causes of cancer. "Ed had a very unusual and original mind, and was never satisfiedwith routine solutions," said Dr. Blumberg.
NEWS
January 13, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Edward D. Lustbader, a member of the Fox Chase Cancer Center research team that won the Nobel Prize for identifying the role that hepatitis B virus plays in cancer, died Thursday after a year-long battle against cancer. He was 49 and a resident of Maple Glen, Montgomery County. "Ed had a very unusual and original mind and was never satisfied with the routine solutions. He was constantly searching and finding individualized approaches to problems," recalled Nobel laureate Dr. Baruch S. Blumberg.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
BLITZEN AND NIXON Looking for that elusive holiday gift for the friend who has everything? How about a T-shirt with a picture of former President Richard Nixon shaking hands with rock-and-roll king Elvis Presley? Or, for the sportsman, how about golf balls imprinted with Nixon's signature? These and other "exclusive originals" are available at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Birthplace in Yorba Linda, Calif. NO SWEAT Don't sweat it: The virus that causes AIDS is not passed on through perspiration, a new study has found.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
For the last five years, the Fox Chase Cancer Center of Northeast Philadelphia has been trying to bring South Jersey's Asian populations a message of life or death importance: They are at high risk for the incurable hepatitis B virus, which causes more than 80 percent of all liver cancer cases in the world. Through Asian churches, schools and local doctors, the cancer center has been encouraging Asian-Americans to go for free screening and check-ups at the Fox Chase center in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A cure for some people suffering from hepatitis B, a deadly liver disease that affects more than 250 million people worldwide, has been discovered by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and 11 other medical centers. Daily injections of interferon alpha, a human protein manufactured through genetic-engineering techniques, eliminated all symptoms of hepatitis B in about one-third of the patients who were given interferon over a four-month period, the researchers found. In addition, all traces of the hepatitis B virus disappeared in about 10 percent of the people who were given the protein, according to the study, which is in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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