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Herpes Virus

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NEWS
December 3, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Scientists believe that they have found a genetic "off" switch that keeps the herpes virus dormant in the body, a discovery that could lead to new strategies for controlling a variety of viruses, including the one that causes AIDS. The researchers found the genetic trigger in herpes simplex virus type 1, the virus that causes cold sores. They believe the same mechanism controls its cousin, herpes simplex 2, which causes genital herpes. The newly described gene is one of about 80 that play various roles in the herpes virus' life cycle.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: I used to get cold sores about two to three times a year. They start with tingling, itching, and burning, and then they scab over. With the last one I had, I took action: I squeezed out the fluid and applied Vicks VapoRub. I haven't had another one since. What do you think of that? Answer: I think that it's a bad idea to pop those tiny clusters of cold sore blisters. They're packed full of viral particles of the herpes variety. And that makes the fluid very, very infectious.
SPORTS
February 5, 1994 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four Eastern tracks have quarantined their stable areas after a possible outbreak of an equine herpes virus was discovered in a riding academy adjacent to Aqueduct Park in Jamaica, N.Y. Philadelphia Park, Garden State Park, Aqueduct and Laurel Race Course in Maryland have closed their stable areas. Revel Schmidt, a Pennsylvania state veterinarian based at Philadelphia Park, said yesterday that no single case has been definitely determined to be the herpes virus, but that precautionary measures were being taken after six horses died at the Jamaica Bay Riding Academy.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The herpes virus that has taken the lives of at least 10 young elephants in North American zoos over the past 15 years doesn't threaten the Philadelphia Zoo's two resident pachyderms. "The animals that died were all young elephants, calves ranging from a year to two years old," said Philadelphia Zoo veterinarian Dr. Keith Hinshaw. "Our resident African elephant is 43, and our resident Indian elephant is 35 years old. " Both are female, and with no active elephant breeding program and no resident bulls in Philadelphia, neither of these older ladies could find herself in a family way. "The cause of the deaths was very mysterious," Hinshaw said.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT So you thought you did your bit on Earth Day by picking up litter. Now the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine says that to be a real environmentalist (76 percent of Americans say they are), you've got to be a vegetarian (3 percent are). The National Cattlemen's Association calls this "a bunch of bull. " OAT FLOAT Just what you've been waiting for - oat-bran ice cream. Not only does this stuff, which uses a fat substitute derived from oat bran called Oatrim, have almost no fat, it might actually lower cholesterol, says the U.S. Agriculture Department researcher who is its principal inventor.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
PREGNANCY-TEST QUESTIONS. Women who use two popular home pregnancy tests apparently get incorrect results about 10 percent of the time because they use them incorrectly. So say researchers reporting in the New England Journal of Medicine, who add that Warner-Lambert's e.p.t. Plus and Ortho Pharmaceutical's ADVANCE tests are highly accurate when used properly. They recommend the tests and instructions be simplified, but the companies say no changes are needed. HERPES DRUG. The first widely used anti-virus drug is losing some of its punch against the herpes virus.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore W. Sery, 86, of Haddonfield, a longtime research scientist at the Wills Eye Institute who also helped create programs for mentally challenged adults in South Jersey, died Sunday, Jan. 2, at Cooper University Hospital after a heart attack. Throughout his more than 30 years as basic research director at Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia, Dr. Sery focused primarily on corneal disease with an emphasis on the herpes virus. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Dr. Sery was one of the pioneers in developing an antiviral eye drop to use on eye ulcers caused by a herpes virus, said William Tasman, former ophthalmologist in chief at Wills Eye. A lot of Dr. Sery's published work, which included more than 30 journal entries, dealt with the effectiveness of the penetration of certain antibiotics into the eye, Tasman said.
NEWS
October 9, 2008
Congratulations to the three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their work in discovering viruses behind two deadly illnesses: cervical cancer and AIDS. One of them has a Pennsylvania connection. Harald zur Hausen, 72, a German virologist who studied for several years in the late 1960s at the University of Pennsylvania, was awarded the Nobel for his discovery of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Zur Hausen spent the 1970s doing research that showed that the virus caused cervical cancer.
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NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: I used to get cold sores about two to three times a year. They start with tingling, itching, and burning, and then they scab over. With the last one I had, I took action: I squeezed out the fluid and applied Vicks VapoRub. I haven't had another one since. What do you think of that? Answer: I think that it's a bad idea to pop those tiny clusters of cold sore blisters. They're packed full of viral particles of the herpes variety. And that makes the fluid very, very infectious.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore W. Sery, 86, of Haddonfield, a longtime research scientist at the Wills Eye Institute who also helped create programs for mentally challenged adults in South Jersey, died Sunday, Jan. 2, at Cooper University Hospital after a heart attack. Throughout his more than 30 years as basic research director at Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia, Dr. Sery focused primarily on corneal disease with an emphasis on the herpes virus. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Dr. Sery was one of the pioneers in developing an antiviral eye drop to use on eye ulcers caused by a herpes virus, said William Tasman, former ophthalmologist in chief at Wills Eye. A lot of Dr. Sery's published work, which included more than 30 journal entries, dealt with the effectiveness of the penetration of certain antibiotics into the eye, Tasman said.
NEWS
April 2, 2010 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The horses at one farm in Gloucester County and five in Monmouth County have been quarantined by the New Jersey Department of Agriculture's Division of Animal Health in an investigation into a possible equine herpes virus (EHV) outbreak, state officials said Thursday. Three horses at Sweet Dreams Farm in Farmingdale, Monmouth County, were euthanized last week after showing signs of the neurological form of EHV, authorities said. Quarantines at the other farms were ordered after it was learned that horses there were from Sweet Dreams or that staff had been in contact with an infected animal from that farm.
NEWS
October 9, 2008
Congratulations to the three scientists awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for their work in discovering viruses behind two deadly illnesses: cervical cancer and AIDS. One of them has a Pennsylvania connection. Harald zur Hausen, 72, a German virologist who studied for several years in the late 1960s at the University of Pennsylvania, was awarded the Nobel for his discovery of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Zur Hausen spent the 1970s doing research that showed that the virus caused cervical cancer.
NEWS
October 7, 2008 | By Faye Flam and Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Back in the 1970s, cancer-research dogma held that a herpes virus probably caused cervical cancer. One young researcher disagreed. Harald zur Hausen, who studied viruses and cancer at the University of Pennsylvania, staked his career on another possibility: the human papilloma virus (HPV). After persisting for more than a decade, he proved his case. "That link was the finding that allowed development of the vaccine" Gardasil, which prevents most cervical cancers, said Peter Kim, president of Merck Research Laboratories.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An additional 5,000 hogs on four farms have tested positive for a highly contagious strain of the herpes virus, a hog disease once thought to have been nearly eradicated in the state. State officials said the outbreak, only the second in the state in four years, should not lower the grade of New Jersey's 24,000 hogs and should not wreak havoc on the $1.2 million market. But the officials cautioned that the U.S. Department of Agriculture could lower the grade of Gloucester County hogs, making the herds difficult or impossible to sell.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | By Erika Hobbs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A highly infectious hog virus was found on a Deptford farm last month, nearly four years after it was thought to have been eradicated in the state. According to state Department of Agriculture authorities, more than 320 hogs on the Messner-Widing hog farm on Delsea Drive were found to be infected with the pseudorabies virus. The hogs were incinerated Aug. 24 at an Indiana facility, said Ernest Zirkle, director of the division of animal health at the New Jersey Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The herpes virus that has taken the lives of at least 10 young elephants in North American zoos over the past 15 years doesn't threaten the Philadelphia Zoo's two resident pachyderms. "The animals that died were all young elephants, calves ranging from a year to two years old," said Philadelphia Zoo veterinarian Dr. Keith Hinshaw. "Our resident African elephant is 43, and our resident Indian elephant is 35 years old. " Both are female, and with no active elephant breeding program and no resident bulls in Philadelphia, neither of these older ladies could find herself in a family way. "The cause of the deaths was very mysterious," Hinshaw said.
SPORTS
June 24, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The NBA labor situation remains cloudy. Perhaps even more so, as the National Basketball Players Association yesterday delayed action on a new labor deal approved earlier in the day by team owners. The players took the unusual step of asking to reopen negotiations on a collective bargaining agreement, rather than rejecting it outright. Players have been divided on the proposal, ratified unanimously by owners in New York and touted by union leadership as containing significant gains in salaries and a quicker route to free agency.
SPORTS
March 23, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Magic Johnson is returning to the NBA to coach the Los Angeles Lakers, the club confirmed last night. Johnson replaces Randy Pfund and will be reunited with his former team at a news conference at the Forum today. "I will confirm for you we have relieved Randy of his head-coaching duties and hired Earvin as coach," John Black, the Lakers' public relations director, said from his home last night. Assistant coach Bill Bertka will coach the Lakers the next two games. "You know I'm disappointed," Pfund said last night from the team's hotel in Dallas, where the Lakers play tonight.
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