FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 4, 1989 | By Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writer
The tiny guys in the car rental business with offices located two and three miles off airport property tried as hard as they could yesterday to talk city officials out of charging them the same fee it charges their big competitors who operate on airport property. The little guys - businesses with names like Thrifty Rent A Car - predicted higher rates for consumers and the collapse of some small agencies if the city persists in its effort to charge small agencies the same fee it charges the giants - Hertz and Avis, among others.
NEWS
May 14, 2012
  C.J. Hertz always is in the middle of the action for Sterling. Hertz is either on the mound as the Silver Knights' ace, or he's behind the plate as a top defensive catcher. In the lineup, he's in the heart of the order as the clean-up hitter. "C.J. has done everything from hitting to defense to pitching for our team this year," Sterling coach Chris Hoffman said. "I don't know where we would be without him. " Hertz said he takes pride in his versatility. He's signed to attend the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia next year, and probably will play multiple positions for the Blue Devils.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1988 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Cheltenham Township man has accused Hertz Corp. in a federal suit of using falsified damage claims, inflated repair bills and forged documents to overcharge customers who damaged their cars in accidents. Hertz, a nationwide car-rental company, charged its customers and their insurance companies two and three times more than it actually paid to repair damaged autos, and it sometimes assessed repair charges for autos that were not damaged at all, the suit charged. The suit, filed last Thursday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia by Kenneth E. Gross of Wyncote, accuses Hertz of racketeering, fraud, misrepresentation and other violations and seeks an undisclosed amount of damages.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1989 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hertz Corp., the world's largest car-rental company, surprised many in the travel industry last week by saying that it would quit participating in airline frequent-flier programs because they had grown too costly. That means that after Jan. 1, if you fly on Delta or America West Airlines and rent a car from Hertz, you don't get additional mileage credit, nor can you earn free car rentals by trading in mileage from the airline programs. Hertz said that similar agreements it has with the frequent-flier programs of American, Continental, Eastern and United Airlines and USAir would expire at later dates.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2016
Question : I recently reserved a midsize rental car in Shannon, Ireland, for myself, my wife, and another couple through Hertz. At the airport, a Hertz representative upgraded us to an SUV, which sounded bigger, but was not. We were given the keys to an Opel Mokka, which was so small we could not fit our bags into it without putting two of them on our laps. I have driven stick-shift cars for 53 years, but when I started driving this car, I had trouble getting it into gear. I must say I was a bit frazzled, as the car was so small and there were four of us in it. I did get it going, but noticed a smell coming from the car right away, so I drove it around the airport block back to Hertz.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hertz has stopped assessing drop charges for one-way rentals on midsize and full-size cars in an effort to bolster leisure rentals. Instead, it has established one-way rates, which are higher than regular rates but far less than the drop charges, which often ran into the hundreds of dollars. Under the new system, renting a midsize car to drive from Philadelphia to Chicago would cost $89.99 per day with a three-day minimum, about $270 altogether. Under the old system, the car would have cost about $35 per day plus a drop charge of $500 to $800, depending on mileage, for a total of at least $605.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTING OUT. Hertz is ending all of its frequent-flier airline partnerships. It announced last month that it would not renew contracts because executives believed the bonus programs cost the company too much - about $35 million a year. The first contracts to expire are with Delta and America West, Dec. 31. Hertz said it would continue to participate fully in frequent-flier programs until its contracts ran out and would honor existing frequent-flier awards. PRICE CUTS. Hotels in Israel have cut rates from 10 to 25 percent in an effort to bolster sagging tourism.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1998 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You say the directions you got to that holiday gathering at grandmother's house were vague, something about crossing a river and passing through some woods? Next time you have to drive somewhere unfamiliar, you may want to consider that Hertz Corp. is expanding its number of vehicles available with satellite-guided navigation systems. Hertz has gotten so serious about the technology that it has formed a joint venture with Magellan Corp., an equipment maker, to install navigational devices based on global-positioning satellites (GPS)
TRAVEL
February 24, 2013 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Question: My husband and I recently rented a car via Auto Europe for a trip to Germany and the Czech Republic. We received a prepaid voucher for a rental from Hertz. When we landed in Munich, Germany, a Hertz representative told us our reservation had been canceled. After some delay, checking on his computer and his garage, he assured us that we could obtain another, smaller car. He said it would cost slightly less than our original rental amount, but that we would have to take up the refund of the original reservation with Auto Europe.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1998 | Daily News staff, Bloomberg News and wire reports
discrimination Kiss jobs goodbye, judge tells retarded pair Rental car leader Hertz Corp. has won a dismissal of a federal discrimination lawsuit brought on behalf of two mentally retarded workers who lost their jobs when their job coaches were fired for kissing on company property. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued in 1996, saying Hertz could have found new job coaches for the workers. The EEOC contended the firings violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. But U.S. District Judge John Feikens found nothing discriminatory.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, Staff Writer
Hello there Lee and Sara had their lives all figured out. Then they met each other. In 2006, Sara, who grew up in University City, was the Nature Conservancy's Pennsylvania director of philanthropy. Married for more than 20 years, she lived with her husband and their two sons in Whitpain Township. Lee, who grew up in Portland, Ore., and came east for college, was a strategic planning consultant based in D.C., where she lived with her partner of 16 years. Sara's office hired her for a project.
TRAVEL
May 30, 2016
Q: I am writing to you today regarding a damage claim I have received from Hertz. I rented a car from the Maui Airport Hertz location this year. I did not do an initial walk­through with an agent to check for damage. Upon my return, I circled the car with a Hertz attendant and returned it in perfect form, and off I went. Three weeks later, I received a call from Hertz claiming that there was front bumper damage and I would be charged $428. This is completely absurd. I absolutely did not damage the car, and returned it in perfect condition.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2016
Question : I recently reserved a midsize rental car in Shannon, Ireland, for myself, my wife, and another couple through Hertz. At the airport, a Hertz representative upgraded us to an SUV, which sounded bigger, but was not. We were given the keys to an Opel Mokka, which was so small we could not fit our bags into it without putting two of them on our laps. I have driven stick-shift cars for 53 years, but when I started driving this car, I had trouble getting it into gear. I must say I was a bit frazzled, as the car was so small and there were four of us in it. I did get it going, but noticed a smell coming from the car right away, so I drove it around the airport block back to Hertz.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
I owe a tip of the hat to Joel and Tamar Port, a Blue Bell couple who'd probably rather get the $150 they lost because of a Priceline car-rental gone awry. Their story highlights one fine-print trap that can snare anyone seeking cheap wheels away from home. But it's also a window onto some other pitfalls - and onto surprising differences among rental companies' policies. If you rent cars often for work, you likely have a standing deal with one or more of the major rental brands - most now consolidated into three multi- brand companies such as Avis Budget Group.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2013 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Question: My husband and I rented a car from Hertz in Munich last summer. The rental process was incredibly time-consuming, and after 45 minutes at the rental desk, a five-minute walk to the garage, and then a 30-minute wait in the garage, we finally received our vehicle. It was parked in the travel lane, so we hurried to load our luggage and ourselves into it and get out of the way. We were not offered the opportunity to examine the car. It was also dark in the garage, and the car was black.
TRAVEL
February 24, 2013 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Question: My husband and I recently rented a car via Auto Europe for a trip to Germany and the Czech Republic. We received a prepaid voucher for a rental from Hertz. When we landed in Munich, Germany, a Hertz representative told us our reservation had been canceled. After some delay, checking on his computer and his garage, he assured us that we could obtain another, smaller car. He said it would cost slightly less than our original rental amount, but that we would have to take up the refund of the original reservation with Auto Europe.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Christina Rexrode, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The biggest story in the stock market Monday was Apple Inc., but that wasn't saying much. Stocks barely moved. Trading was light, even by the slumberous standards of August. Investors - those who weren't on vacation - killed time waiting for a speech by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke later this week. In the meantime, there wasn't much else to guide them. Apple was one of the only shreds of action in an otherwise dull market. The stock shot to an all-time high of $680.87 and finished at $675.68, up $12.46, or 1.9 percent.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
A two-week archaeological probe of what was the city's 17th- and 18th-century riverfront uncovered great rounded timbers laid side by side, most likely evidence of the James West shipyard, built before the arrival of William Penn. The exploratory dig, conducted at the behest of the Delaware River Waterfront Corp., hit wooden structures this week, just days before the scheduled conclusion of the two-week project Friday. "We definitely have something here," said Tim Mancl, project field director for John Milner Associates, an archaeological and preservation planning firm.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A two-week archaeological probe of what was the city's 17th- and 18th-century riverfront uncovered great rounded timbers laid side by side, most likely evidence of the James West shipyard, built before the arrival of William Penn. The exploratory dig, conducted at the behest of the Delaware River Waterfront Corp., hit wooden structures this week, just days before the scheduled conclusion of the two-week project Friday. "We definitely have something here," said Tim Mancl, project field director for John Milner Associates, an archaeological and preservation planning firm.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2012 | Jeff Gelles
In hindsight, many of the vehicle crashes that kill more than 30,000 people a year in the United States seem utterly senseless — avoidable if a drunk had just stayed off the road, a distracted driver had let a text go unanswered, or a commercial driver had been better rested or less worried about the costs of delay. Even in that sad litany, the deaths of Jacqueline and Raechel Houck stand out: preventable by a simple fix in car-rental practices. Yet, after two years of crusading to get rental-car companies to change their ways, their bereaved mother, Carol "Cally" Houck, still hasn't quite succeeded.
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