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High Art

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NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON JUNCTION - The brass band couldn't make it. The banners outside the studio were for an athletic event at Mercer County Community College. Thus, in its own unglamorous way, did WWFM-FM debut its significant new show on Aug. 4 that takes the Curtis Institute of Music out of its Field Concert Hall headquarters and onto the airwaves every Saturday at noon. You'd think this radio milestone would have been promoted with the best-known piece ever written at Curtis, Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings . "Nah!
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'Good girl, bad girl," explained mezzo-soprano Susan Graham when she arrived on the Perelman Theater stage for the second half of her recital. At first, her hair was up and the gown was an off-white dress. Second half, hair was down, the gown off-black and slinky. In effect, Graham's rescheduled recital on Thursday, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, had many of the add-ons that many recitals lack - glamour, humor, repertoire that was high art (and not so high), plus playful audience dialogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
If any proof were needed, Richard DeVore's exhibition at Locks Gallery confirms his reputation as a contemporary master of ceramic art. DeVore's achievement is more than technical, although even a casual examination of his pots confirms that technique contributes considerably to their success. Even more impressive, though, is the way he transforms basic functional vessels into abstractions without destroying their formal essence. DeVore makes pots that look utilitarian, but that are so refined and so expressive of pottery traditions that you would never think of using them as containers.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
He's back. And once again Jon Winokur, entertains us with a fresh collection of more than 1,000 wry and irreverent quotations, anecdotes and interviews from a most cantankerous, and impressive, crew. Winokur's latest effort - The Portable Curmudgeon Redux - is enormously successful because irony and humor suffuse every page. In the words of author Paul Fussell, whom he quotes, Winokur finds that there's "nothing more depressing than optimism. " Winokur's incorrigible misanthropes run the gamut from Marlon Brando to George Bernard Shaw to Frank Zappa.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You know you're not there to hear Tosca when, a few minutes before curtain time, the general director of the opera company drops by with a stack of Dixie cups, "just in case alcohol arrives at your table. " Andy: A Popera is a party. The new piece, premiered Thursday night in a warehouse on North American Street in Kensington, riffs on episodes and philosophical innovations in the life of Andy Warhol. It raises an urgent set of telescoping questions. What qualifies as art?
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The title for "High Art" is a macabre sort of pun. The movie is about people in the Manhattan art world who are high on dope most of the time. Or low on dope, as is the case here. The movie stars Ally Sheedy as a reclusive photographer, a lesbian who lives with a German actress (Patricia Clarkson) in a New York apartment that is a gathering place for people who like to snort heroin, then slouch into a stupor. Sheedy is jolted from her hermitlike existence by a reclusive young admiring magazine editor (Radha Mitchell)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A dark, deftly told psychodrama about the house-sitter from hell (and the homeowner from limbo), Cleopatra's Second Husband is one of those out-of-nowhere indie pics - no expectations, no buzz - that turns out to be a wicked treat. Laced with a venomous wit, and turning progressively creepier as it unfolds, writer-director Jon Reiss' movie offers a black-humored study of suppressed rage, sexual gamesmanship, domination and subordination. Paul Hipp stars as Robert, a mopey art photographer who retreats to the kitchen to do dishes rather than continue chatting with his dinner guests - he leaves that to the overbearing, jittery Hallie (Bitty Schram)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1996 | By Robert DiGiacomo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Stars have been discovered in dime stores and Dairy Queens, so why not at the Franklin Mills mall? Last month Kellianne Cole of Hatfield and Jason Winston George of Center City traipsed to the mall with 2,000 other "attractive, dynamic and physically fit" hopefuls for what is known in the acting business as a cattle call. Sometime this month, they'll be flown to Hollywood to be screen-tested for parts in Aaron Spelling's new daytime drama, Sunset Beach, which debuts Jan. 6 on NBC. Of 14,000 who tried out in eight cities, Cole and George are among 16 to make the cut. "My first reaction was quite Rocky-like.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
In French a beast is called "la bĂȘte" But here he's a troubadour, not a pet. The Prince says, "I'm smitten with this clown, "Obey me now: Force not a frown! "I am the boss of your thee-ayter "And to my taste you all must cater. " "Fie, fie, great Sire," the director declares, "Our art does not traffic in vulgar wares. "We cannot - will not! - perform mere shows "Since we're married to the High and Beaux. " Endlessly talking and blowing, the Beast Ignores their quarrel, critiques their feast.
FOOD
February 14, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Food can be high art in some of Philadelphia's best restaurants. But why is it so hard to find a masterpiece meal in one of the city's great art museums? We know it can be done, since Danny Meyer set the bar high for arty destination dining in New York with the Modern at the Museum of Modern Art. But don't hold your breath for such haute-culinary inspirations at a museum near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The Barnes Foundation's Garden Restaurant was our best hope for something extraordinary.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You know you're not there to hear Tosca when, a few minutes before curtain time, the general director of the opera company drops by with a stack of Dixie cups, "just in case alcohol arrives at your table. " Andy: A Popera is a party. The new piece, premiered Thursday night in a warehouse on North American Street in Kensington, riffs on episodes and philosophical innovations in the life of Andy Warhol. It raises an urgent set of telescoping questions. What qualifies as art?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
In French a beast is called "la bĂȘte" But here he's a troubadour, not a pet. The Prince says, "I'm smitten with this clown, "Obey me now: Force not a frown! "I am the boss of your thee-ayter "And to my taste you all must cater. " "Fie, fie, great Sire," the director declares, "Our art does not traffic in vulgar wares. "We cannot - will not! - perform mere shows "Since we're married to the High and Beaux. " Endlessly talking and blowing, the Beast Ignores their quarrel, critiques their feast.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
'Good girl, bad girl," explained mezzo-soprano Susan Graham when she arrived on the Perelman Theater stage for the second half of her recital. At first, her hair was up and the gown was an off-white dress. Second half, hair was down, the gown off-black and slinky. In effect, Graham's rescheduled recital on Thursday, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, had many of the add-ons that many recitals lack - glamour, humor, repertoire that was high art (and not so high), plus playful audience dialogue.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Ninth Annual International Fiber Biennial opens Friday, and for Rick Snyderman, the city's preeminent rag man, it's back to the future. Snyderman and his wife, Ruth, preside over the place where it all began in the 1990s, the Snyderman-Works Galleries in Old City. They nurtured what started as a one-shot gallery exhibition into a biennial that spread its fibrous tentacles to other art spaces and became a citywide event in 2006. Under the wing of the University of the Arts, the fiber biennial expanded all over town in 2008, 2010, and 2012.
FOOD
February 14, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Food can be high art in some of Philadelphia's best restaurants. But why is it so hard to find a masterpiece meal in one of the city's great art museums? We know it can be done, since Danny Meyer set the bar high for arty destination dining in New York with the Modern at the Museum of Modern Art. But don't hold your breath for such haute-culinary inspirations at a museum near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The Barnes Foundation's Garden Restaurant was our best hope for something extraordinary.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON JUNCTION - The brass band couldn't make it. The banners outside the studio were for an athletic event at Mercer County Community College. Thus, in its own unglamorous way, did WWFM-FM debut its significant new show on Aug. 4 that takes the Curtis Institute of Music out of its Field Concert Hall headquarters and onto the airwaves every Saturday at noon. You'd think this radio milestone would have been promoted with the best-known piece ever written at Curtis, Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings . "Nah!
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Any art museum that desires to attract adolescent males (that is, males up to the age of about 25) might follow the lead of the Allentown Art Museum and stage an exhibition like "At the Edge: Art of the Fantastic. " In a catalog statement, the museum's president and chief executive officer, J. Brooks Joyner, calls this extensive display of fantasy art "the first of its kind and scale to be undertaken by a museum of fine arts in America. " I can believe it, because art museums traditionally consider art of this kind to be beyond the pale - overtly commercial, lurid, and devoid of serious aesthetic character.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
THE Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations' report on South Philly High's tensions recommended several actions to create communities of respect in schools. This suggestion is based on their finding that building bridges between educators and community groups helps form supportive school environments. Fortunately, examples of community-school arts collaborations are in place and improving the school climate, chipping away at barriers that hinder tolerance and nurturing an appreciation of diversity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2009 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
The group show "Urban Convergence" at Asian Arts spins with a mix of imagery. It has more variety than one commonly sees in a group show. And its images are unlike anything we usually associate with human figures, landscape, or abstraction. Yet there seems to be a worldview at its center, just not obviously so. For certain, this display ventures far into uncharted territory, touching a genuine vein of experience along the way. The overview it provides shows art in constant restless transformation in work by 16 artists, their styles ranging from easel painting to street art, with side trips into urban subcultures.
NEWS
March 4, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Under dim lights and to the beat of electronic music, South Philadelphia-born designer Ralph Rucci floated an exquisite black duchess satin gown down the circular runway in Le Couvent des Cordeliers. The sleeveless, slightly high-necked bodice glittered. The full skirt was covered with ostrich feathers placed with such exactness, the bottom of the garment looked like one continuous piece of textured velvet. The dress captured the regality that a finale piece should. "My collection is about how to look and live in a moment when luxury is an excess or trend," Rucci said moments after the last model delicately walked the runway.
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