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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has barred a Montgomery County judge from hearing the custody dispute involving a mother who fled the country with her two children and the millionaire father who searched the world to bring them home. The high court issued the order last week in response to a petition filed on behalf of the mother, Ellen Dever, by her attorneys, Richard A. Sprague and William H. Lamb. The justices, who did not state a reason for removing Judge Rhonda Lee Daniele, also barred any other Montgomery County judges from the case.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ordered a new trial for a man serving life for a notorious robbery and murder 24 years ago, ruling that the city prosecutor purposely excluded African Americans from the jury that convicted him. In a one-paragraph order Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz wrote that the District Attorney's Office must retry Edward Sistrunk within 90 days or set him free. Donna Zucker, chief of the district attorney's federal appeals unit, said Katz's ruling would be appealed to the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - States cannot ban the sale or rental of ultraviolent video games to children, the Supreme Court ruled, 7-2, Monday, rejecting such limits as a violation of young people's First Amendment rights and leaving it to parents and the multibillion-dollar gaming industry to decide what children can buy. The high court threw out California's 2005 law covering games sold or rented to those under 18, calling it an unconstitutional violation of...
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court handed convicted murderer and onetime counterculture guru Ira Einhorn a legal defeat yesterday when justices denied, without comment, his request that the high court seize control of his legal odyssey. The decision clears the way for Einhorn, who was convicted in absentia in 1993, to seek a new trial in Common Pleas Court. On Wednesday, Common Pleas Court Judge D. Webster Keogh is scheduled to rule on Einhorn's request for a new trial in the 1977 death of his onetime girlfriend Holly Maddux.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court yesterday agreed to examine the rights of hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans forced into mass detention camps during World War II. The case is the first of a series now pending in which Japanese-Americans seek monetary damages for the internment, which was ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and defended as a military necessity. Specifically, the high court agreed to review a request by the Reagan administration to block a 1983 lawsuit from coming to trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Jim Newton
Is empathy a desirable quality in a U.S. Supreme Court justice? President Obama said he was searching for it. But as a qualification for a jurist, it gives conservatives the willies and can produce mixed results. We expect judges to resist empathy and impose the law evenhandedly. We are appropriately outraged when a judge goes easy on a defendant with whom he identifies - the suburban white kid, say, who gets community service, whereas his urban black counterpart goes off to jail.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Anyone seeking evidence of the potential impact of the presidential race on the Supreme Court and its handling of controversial social and religious issues need look no further than its decision Monday banning student-led prayers at public school sporting events. The court split along what have become predictable lines, with Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Anthony Kennedy, two conservative swing votes, joining the court's liberal-to-moderate bloc in voting to ban the prayers. But court experts say that with as many as four justices approaching the age at which they may step down, the next president has the potential to reshape the court for years to come.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has removed a Philadelphia judge from a death-penalty case for altering a transcript to remove a disparaging remark she made about the defendant. In a concurring statement with the high court's April 28 order, Justice Max Baer declared the admitted actions of Common Please Court Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes "reprehensible. " Hughes, 55, already is scheduled to retire and is set to become the chief executive officer of the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the American Red Cross on May 16. In a statement issued Friday evening, chapter chairman Michael Coslov said that the high court's decision "in no way will affect Judge Hughes' ability to be a strong, effective leader for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Red Cross, nor her ability to help those in need.
NEWS
December 2, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday refused to block the deportation of a Long Island man who has been sentenced to death in the Soviet Union for collaborating with the Nazis during World War II. In another case, a proposed settlement involving Lukens Steel in Chester County, Pa., may nullify the court's agreement to search for racial segregation. Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark had urged the court to review the case of Estonian-born Karl Linnas, one of the first targets of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
For the first time, two African American women will serve as the top judges in the Philadelphia court system, the state Supreme Court decided Wednesday. The high court appointed Judge Jacqueline F. Allen as administrative judge of the trial division of Common Pleas Court, which includes the system's busiest and most prestigious criminal and civil courtrooms. The court named Judge Sheila A. Woods-Skipper, already the president judge of Common Pleas Court, to chair the system's administrative governing board.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
A charter-schools suit with major financial implications for the Philadelphia School District is one of 27 cases caught up in the turnover of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Back in September 2014, the court heard arguments in the case that centers on the School Reform Commission's authority to manage charter-school growth in the financially distressed district. The court never ruled. And now that only three of the justices who heard the arguments are still on the bench, the court last week said it would resubmit the case and decide it based on the legal briefs that have already been filed.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
A report that two more Pennsylvania Supreme Court justices were no strangers to the state's sprawling electronic profanity exchange shows why the high court has been widely urged to order an independent investigation of the scandal - and why it hasn't done so. Given Attorney General Kathleen Kane's propensity to disclose the emails selectively to maximize distraction from her own travails, only an independent investigation can determine the true...
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Staff Writer
The state office that enforces ethical behavior by lawyers urged the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Wednesday to reaffirm its suspension of Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's law license. Two weeks ago, Kane asked the high court to undo its unanimous order suspending her license. She did so as the state Senate moved forward on a proposal to remove her as the state's highest-ranking law enforcement official because she no longer has a license to practice law. Kane's lawyers said in her appeal that the Supreme Court's 5-0 vote in September was "incurably tainted" by the participation of Justice J. Michael Eakin, who is now facing misconduct charges because of his involvement in the so-called Porngate scandal.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As Pennsylvania's courts have relentlessly demonstrated, a judiciary populated by a partisan political process will behave accordingly. State Supreme Court Justice-without-portfolio J. Michael Eakin's attempt to engineer last-minute lame-duck appointments provides only the latest troubling evidence thereof. In December, on the brink of the high court's most dramatic shift in centuries and a proceeding that could remove him from office, Eakin urged his fellow justices to hastily install the next leaders of Philadelphia's patronage-rich court system, The Inquirer reported this week.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
The New Jersey Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider Virtua Health's motion to block implementation of a law that would force the hospital to cede partial control of emergency medical services in Camden to Cooper University Hospital, pending the state's appeal. The high court said in an order that it would hear Virtua's full motion next Tuesday. The court's action comes after the Appellate Division reversed a lower court judge's stay of the law, signed by Republican Gov. Christie in July.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin tearfully apologized Monday for exchanging emails that included pictures of naked women and crude jokes that mocked minorities, gays, lesbians, and others. But the justice also said he had been the victim of a "media circus" - "dragged through the mud without the opportunity to address the misstatements and, in my mind, the total dishonesty in many of the news reports. " Appearing before the judicial ethics court that is weighing misconduct charges against him, Eakin said he regretted the messages, sent and received on a private account but made public because they were exchanged on government computer servers.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Angela Couloumbis, and Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Wolf on Sunday renewed his call for Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin to resign, but the justice's lawyer said Eakin has no intention of stepping down. Wolf said Sunday that Eakin showed "a remarkable lack of judgment" by voting to fill a vacancy on the judicial disciplinary tribunal that is to weigh misconduct allegations against him in the pornographic email scandal. Elaborating on his criticism of Eakin's conduct, the governor issued a statement Sunday that reiterated his call for the justice to resign.
NEWS
December 7, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
In 2009, State Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin exchanged emails with some old friends, including a state prosecutor and a prospective lower-court judge. Among the topics: visits to strip clubs and sexual gibes about female staffers in Eakin's office. At one point, the justice wrote that he had "a stake" of 50 one-dollar bills to give strippers - to resolve his "titty-deficit. " In that email from June 18, 2009, Eakin wrote that an incoming Dauphin County judge would soon learn that a discreet judge "has to go out of state to see boobs.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Cause and effect collided last week as the scandal-decimated ranks of Pennsylvania's highest court were replenished in a flurry of money and mudslinging. The three Democratic judges who were elected to the supremely troubled court range from adequately to highly qualified, but so do the Republican judges who weren't. What made the difference was likely the deluge of money from unions, lawyers, and other interests, about three-quarters of which went to the Democrats. In fact, the top three finishers were the top three fund-raisers in identical order: Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Kevin Dougherty followed by Superior Court Judges David Wecht and Christine Donohue.
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