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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has barred a Montgomery County judge from hearing the custody dispute involving a mother who fled the country with her two children and the millionaire father who searched the world to bring them home. The high court issued the order last week in response to a petition filed on behalf of the mother, Ellen Dever, by her attorneys, Richard A. Sprague and William H. Lamb. The justices, who did not state a reason for removing Judge Rhonda Lee Daniele, also barred any other Montgomery County judges from the case.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ordered a new trial for a man serving life for a notorious robbery and murder 24 years ago, ruling that the city prosecutor purposely excluded African Americans from the jury that convicted him. In a one-paragraph order Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz wrote that the District Attorney's Office must retry Edward Sistrunk within 90 days or set him free. Donna Zucker, chief of the district attorney's federal appeals unit, said Katz's ruling would be appealed to the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - States cannot ban the sale or rental of ultraviolent video games to children, the Supreme Court ruled, 7-2, Monday, rejecting such limits as a violation of young people's First Amendment rights and leaving it to parents and the multibillion-dollar gaming industry to decide what children can buy. The high court threw out California's 2005 law covering games sold or rented to those under 18, calling it an unconstitutional violation of...
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court handed convicted murderer and onetime counterculture guru Ira Einhorn a legal defeat yesterday when justices denied, without comment, his request that the high court seize control of his legal odyssey. The decision clears the way for Einhorn, who was convicted in absentia in 1993, to seek a new trial in Common Pleas Court. On Wednesday, Common Pleas Court Judge D. Webster Keogh is scheduled to rule on Einhorn's request for a new trial in the 1977 death of his onetime girlfriend Holly Maddux.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court yesterday agreed to examine the rights of hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans forced into mass detention camps during World War II. The case is the first of a series now pending in which Japanese-Americans seek monetary damages for the internment, which was ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and defended as a military necessity. Specifically, the high court agreed to review a request by the Reagan administration to block a 1983 lawsuit from coming to trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Jim Newton
Is empathy a desirable quality in a U.S. Supreme Court justice? President Obama said he was searching for it. But as a qualification for a jurist, it gives conservatives the willies and can produce mixed results. We expect judges to resist empathy and impose the law evenhandedly. We are appropriately outraged when a judge goes easy on a defendant with whom he identifies - the suburban white kid, say, who gets community service, whereas his urban black counterpart goes off to jail.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Anyone seeking evidence of the potential impact of the presidential race on the Supreme Court and its handling of controversial social and religious issues need look no further than its decision Monday banning student-led prayers at public school sporting events. The court split along what have become predictable lines, with Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Anthony Kennedy, two conservative swing votes, joining the court's liberal-to-moderate bloc in voting to ban the prayers. But court experts say that with as many as four justices approaching the age at which they may step down, the next president has the potential to reshape the court for years to come.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has removed a Philadelphia judge from a death-penalty case for altering a transcript to remove a disparaging remark she made about the defendant. In a concurring statement with the high court's April 28 order, Justice Max Baer declared the admitted actions of Common Please Court Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes "reprehensible. " Hughes, 55, already is scheduled to retire and is set to become the chief executive officer of the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the American Red Cross on May 16. In a statement issued Friday evening, chapter chairman Michael Coslov said that the high court's decision "in no way will affect Judge Hughes' ability to be a strong, effective leader for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Red Cross, nor her ability to help those in need.
NEWS
December 2, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday refused to block the deportation of a Long Island man who has been sentenced to death in the Soviet Union for collaborating with the Nazis during World War II. In another case, a proposed settlement involving Lukens Steel in Chester County, Pa., may nullify the court's agreement to search for racial segregation. Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark had urged the court to review the case of Estonian-born Karl Linnas, one of the first targets of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations.
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NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
When the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in the nation's most closely watched immigration lawsuit, Libia Rodriguez will be among the expected thousands of demonstrators at the court's white marble steps. The case, United States v. Texas , could be a life-changer for Rodriguez, 31, an undocumented Mexican immigrant who lives in Coatesville with her husband, also here illegally, and their three U.S.-born children. Depending on the justices' ruling, the couple could put aside their worries of being sent back to Mexico.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
Pennsylvania's Court of Judicial Discipline noted last week that the profane and bigoted emails that finally forced state Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin to resign were marked by "arrogance and the belief that an individual is better than his or her peers. " Ironically, the court pointed this out in the course of a ruling that allowed Eakin to escape a public accounting of his misdeeds and perhaps additional penalties at trial. The unmistakable impression is that Pennsylvania's entire judiciary suffers from an arrogance that prevents it from subjecting its own to the sort of unflinching judgment it imposes on others.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITERS
A Pennsylvania judicial tribunal on Thursday found disgraced former Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin guilty of ethical misconduct for his exchange of offensive emails and fined him $50,000, but allowed him to keep his $153,000 annual pension. The six members of the Court of Judicial Discipline unanimously found that Eakin, by exchanging in "insensitive" sexually oriented and otherwise troubling emails on government computers, had undermined public confidence in the judiciary.
NEWS
March 23, 2016
ISSUE | SUPREME COURT Defer to voter dissatisfaction Since virtually the entire country is dissatisfied with the way our federal government is being run and wants change, confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's replacement should be postponed until immediately after the November elections to give voters a chance to express their will and have it acted upon. That said, President Obama acted correctly in making his nomination - it was his duty. Until the elections, Judge Merrick Garland's nomination can be discussed.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, Craig R. McCoy, and Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin has resigned his seat on the state's highest court, months after being charged with judicial ethics lapses for his involvement in a pornographic email scandal. He is the second top jurist to step down amid revelations that prosecutors, judges, and law enforcement officials for years exchanged pornographic and otherwise offensive emails, often using state computers. "We have lost one of the finest jurists on the court," Eakin's lawyer, William Costopoulos, said at a news conference Tuesday.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court has reprimanded Thomas J. Scattergood, a former municipal judge who served in various Burlington County towns, for downgrading traffic tickets for acquaintances instead of recusing himself, and for making sexist and undignified remarks at several court hearings. The court also barred Scattergood from holding future judicial office, saying in a 30-page presentment last week that his conduct had "undermined the public's confidence . . . in the integrity and impartiality of the judiciary.
NEWS
March 7, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
Not even Vice President Biden, a 36-year Senate veteran and former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, would be afforded the courtesy of a Senate interview, much less a Judiciary Committee hearing, should President Obama nominate him to fill the seat left vacant by the passing of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Or so I was recently told by Utah's Sen. Orrin Hatch, one of the 11 Republicans on the committee who signed a letter saying they will "withhold consent on any nominee to the Supreme Court submitted by this president to fill Justice Scalia's vacancy.
NEWS
February 19, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITERS
Teacher reassignments. Caps on charters. School closings. All those weighty matters could be up in the air in Philadelphia schools, after this week's Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision that stripped the School Reform Commission of extraordinary powers it had believed it had - and had used - under state law. Lawyers and close watchers of the School District were still combing through the 18-page decision Wednesday, determining exactly what...
NEWS
February 17, 2016
There is no precedent or principle that should prevent a duly elected president from making a nomination to the Supreme Court, or the Senate from considering it, with nearly a year left in their terms. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) and others have understandable motives for attempting to invent one. Rejecting or ignoring a qualified nominee would be much more difficult and potentially embarrassing to the Senate than claiming that some time-honored maxim won't allow it to fulfill its constitutional obligation until next year.
NEWS
February 14, 2016 | Josh Blackman
Josh BlackmanĀ is the author of "Unraveled: Obamacare, Executive Power, and Religious Liberty," and a constitutional law professor at the South Texas College of Law who joined amicus briefs in "United States v. Texas" supporting the states on behalf of the Cato Institute This spring, in United States v. Texas , the Supreme Court will decide the legality of President Obama's executive action on immigration, known as Deferred Action for...
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