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NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has barred a Montgomery County judge from hearing the custody dispute involving a mother who fled the country with her two children and the millionaire father who searched the world to bring them home. The high court issued the order last week in response to a petition filed on behalf of the mother, Ellen Dever, by her attorneys, Richard A. Sprague and William H. Lamb. The justices, who did not state a reason for removing Judge Rhonda Lee Daniele, also barred any other Montgomery County judges from the case.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has ordered a new trial for a man serving life for a notorious robbery and murder 24 years ago, ruling that the city prosecutor purposely excluded African Americans from the jury that convicted him. In a one-paragraph order Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Marvin Katz wrote that the District Attorney's Office must retry Edward Sistrunk within 90 days or set him free. Donna Zucker, chief of the district attorney's federal appeals unit, said Katz's ruling would be appealed to the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - States cannot ban the sale or rental of ultraviolent video games to children, the Supreme Court ruled, 7-2, Monday, rejecting such limits as a violation of young people's First Amendment rights and leaving it to parents and the multibillion-dollar gaming industry to decide what children can buy. The high court threw out California's 2005 law covering games sold or rented to those under 18, calling it an unconstitutional violation of...
NEWS
November 10, 2001 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court handed convicted murderer and onetime counterculture guru Ira Einhorn a legal defeat yesterday when justices denied, without comment, his request that the high court seize control of his legal odyssey. The decision clears the way for Einhorn, who was convicted in absentia in 1993, to seek a new trial in Common Pleas Court. On Wednesday, Common Pleas Court Judge D. Webster Keogh is scheduled to rule on Einhorn's request for a new trial in the 1977 death of his onetime girlfriend Holly Maddux.
NEWS
November 18, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The Supreme Court yesterday agreed to examine the rights of hundreds of thousands of Japanese-Americans forced into mass detention camps during World War II. The case is the first of a series now pending in which Japanese-Americans seek monetary damages for the internment, which was ordered by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and defended as a military necessity. Specifically, the high court agreed to review a request by the Reagan administration to block a 1983 lawsuit from coming to trial in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Jim Newton
Is empathy a desirable quality in a U.S. Supreme Court justice? President Obama said he was searching for it. But as a qualification for a jurist, it gives conservatives the willies and can produce mixed results. We expect judges to resist empathy and impose the law evenhandedly. We are appropriately outraged when a judge goes easy on a defendant with whom he identifies - the suburban white kid, say, who gets community service, whereas his urban black counterpart goes off to jail.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Anyone seeking evidence of the potential impact of the presidential race on the Supreme Court and its handling of controversial social and religious issues need look no further than its decision Monday banning student-led prayers at public school sporting events. The court split along what have become predictable lines, with Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Anthony Kennedy, two conservative swing votes, joining the court's liberal-to-moderate bloc in voting to ban the prayers. But court experts say that with as many as four justices approaching the age at which they may step down, the next president has the potential to reshape the court for years to come.
NEWS
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court has removed a Philadelphia judge from a death-penalty case for altering a transcript to remove a disparaging remark she made about the defendant. In a concurring statement with the high court's April 28 order, Justice Max Baer declared the admitted actions of Common Please Court Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes "reprehensible. " Hughes, 55, already is scheduled to retire and is set to become the chief executive officer of the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the American Red Cross on May 16. In a statement issued Friday evening, chapter chairman Michael Coslov said that the high court's decision "in no way will affect Judge Hughes' ability to be a strong, effective leader for the Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Red Cross, nor her ability to help those in need.
NEWS
December 2, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday refused to block the deportation of a Long Island man who has been sentenced to death in the Soviet Union for collaborating with the Nazis during World War II. In another case, a proposed settlement involving Lukens Steel in Chester County, Pa., may nullify the court's agreement to search for racial segregation. Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark had urged the court to review the case of Estonian-born Karl Linnas, one of the first targets of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations.
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NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane has said her legal problems stem from an attempt by enemies to block her from exposing their exchange of pornographic emails on state computers. But newly unsealed documents show that Kane was told nearly nine months ago by the state's highest court that she was not restricted from publicly releasing information about the messages. On Tuesday, the state Supreme Court unsealed two orders, both from last December, in which the justices ruled that Kane was not barred from "appropriate" disclosure of the pornographic images.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE SUPREME COURT of Pennsylvania will hear an appeal from the school district and the School Reform Commission related to the cancellation of the teachers' contract, according to an order issued by the court earlier this week. The judges will address the issue of whether certain sections of state law "authorized the School Reform Commission and the School District of Philadelphia to cancel their collective bargaining agreement with the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers and impose new economic terms," according to the order.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's highest court will decide whether the Philadelphia School Reform Commission can cancel its teachers' contract. Had the Supreme Court declined to take the case, the SRC's move in October 2014 to cancel its contract with the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers (PFT) would have been voided. The Supreme Court, however, through an order issued Monday, essentially gave the district another shot at achieving by fiat what it has been unable to get at the bargaining table. In January, Commonwealth Court sided with the union, putting aside the SRC's unilateral cancellation of the contract and changes it had imposed on the members' health-care plan.
NEWS
August 2, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul Panepinto, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge for the last 24 years, on Friday became an independent candidate for the state Supreme Court. Panepinto, who ran as a Republican for the Supreme Court in 2007 and 2009 and for Commonwealth Court in 2011, filed 28,000 signatures on nomination papers Friday in Harrisburg. Independent candidates need signatures from at least 16,639 registered voters to appear on the Nov. 3 general election ballot. Rob Gleason, chairman of the state Republican Party, promised to keep a close eye on Panepinto's petitions.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey Supreme Court has agreed to hear a challenge to a 2011 law that suspended retirees' cost-of-living adjustments as part of an overhaul of the pension system for public workers. That same law was recently scrutinized in a high-profile case, in which the court struck down a provision granting public workers a contractual right to pension funding. Public-sector unions had argued that Gov. Christie violated workers' constitutional rights by underfunding the pension system last fiscal year.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
The Nov. 3 general election for three open seats on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court was already shaping up as a doozy. A Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge appears ready to turn that race even more on its ear. Paul Panepinto, a judge for 24 years, left the Republican Party on March 26, registering to vote as an independent. That makes him eligible to run for the state's highest court without a party label. The race already includes three Democrats and three Republicans.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many lawyers does it take to fund a Supreme Court race? Almost a thousand, according to recently filed documents that provide a detailed picture of who gave to whom in this year's race for three seats on the state's high court. Why they gave - and what the benefits may be - are not always clear. Among the lawyers who collectively gave about $1.5 million to judicial candidates are some who likely will eventually represent clients before the state's high court. The host of litigators is joined by political action committees, unions, business owners, and regular folks who, from Jan. 1 to June 8, made 4,130 contributions totaling $5.6 million in a state that has no limits on individual spending.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
John Speer rested a rainbow flag - the same one Mayor Nutter ordered Friday to fly at City Hall - on one shoulder. Speer, 72, came out in 1976. Before that, he sneaked into gay bars. "I really didn't think I'd live to see this day," said Speer, one of hundreds who convened on Independence Mall to celebrate a Supreme Court decision declaring same-sex marriage a constitutional right. Nutter, less than an hour after his flight from Italy landed in Philadelphia, read from the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
June 26, 2015
POPE FRANCIS hasn't even arrived, but already yesterday brought two miracles. Both are court rulings, and both will ensure millions of Pennsylvanians will be able to lead healthier lives. First, the state Commonwealth Court struck down Act 192 that would have allowed the National Rifle Association to sue Pennsylvania cities that enact local gun laws, and demand taxpayers pay their legal fees. The law was an affront to big cities like ours that are fighting against gun violence. The court's decision dealt a rare defeat for the NRA, a miracle for which we have two words: Praise Jesus.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
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