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BUSINESS
March 22, 2011 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court decided Monday not to stop the release of Federal Reserve Board documents identifying financial companies that received Fed loans to survive the 2008-09 financial crisis. The high court, without comment, refused to hear an appeal from an association of bankers trying to keep the information from becoming public. News Corp.'s Fox News Network L.L.C. and Bloomberg L.P. had sued separately for details about loans that commercial banks and Wall Street firms received and the collateral they put up. Other news agencies, including The Associated Press, filed briefs with the appellate court in their support.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
An 83-year-old Bucks County man will begin serving a lengthy sentence for sexually abusing two children, and an inmate's right to carry rosary beads into a Graterford Prison visiting area will be restudied, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled. Richard Wildermuth, a retired florist who was sentenced in Bucks County Court to a mandatory five years in prison for the rape of two girls, lost an appeal before the high court yesterday. The court, citing the lack of a "substantial federal question," let stand a 1985 Pennsylvania appeals court ruling that Wildermuth's sentence was not cruel and unusual punishment barred by the Constitution.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A divided New Jersey Supreme Court yesterday ordered the state to continue to provide emergency shelter to nearly 800 homeless families for 30 more days while a lower court considers a lawsuit challenging the state's homeless policy. The court ruled 4-3 to grant the extension sought by the state's public advocate after a three-judge panel of the Appellate Division of Superior Court rejected the request last week. The public advocate, Alfred Slocum, sued the Department of Human Services, arguing that the state should be barred from evicting homeless families from temporary shelters as long as the families make a determined search for a home but find that they are too poor to afford one. As part of its ruling, the high court ordered the appellate division to rule within the 30-day extension period.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Casey yesterday nominated Juanita Kidd Stout to the state Supreme Court, making his surprise announcement at a luncheon honoring the memory of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. If confirmed by the Senate, Stout, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, would be the first black woman ever to serve on the state's highest court, and only the second woman in its history, according to the governor's office. Stout was seated on the dais when Casey made his announcement while addressing a crowd of 1,500 at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2011 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Tuesday made it easier to haul businesses into court, ruling in separate cases that investors can sue them for purposefully withholding damaging information about a product and that employees can sue them for retaliation without having to make a written complaint. The court ruled unanimously to let a lawsuit by a group of investors against Matrixx Initiatives Inc., the maker of the now-discontinued Zicam nasal cold remedies, proceed, while ruling in the other case, on a 6-2 vote, to let Kevin Kasten's retaliation lawsuit against Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corp.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Maryclaire Dale, Associated Press
The U.S. Supreme Court has passed up a pair of cases for the online age - whether schools may censor students who are at home when they create online attacks against school officials and other students. The justices on Tuesday rejected appeals from Pennsylvania and West Virginia involving questions about the limits on criticism from students and where the authority of school officials ends. The high-court decision left standing lower-court rulings that two Pennsylvania students could not be disciplined at school for parodies of their principals that they created on home computers and posted online.
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 13 years in the federal court system, the discrimination case against USX Corp.'s Fairless Works in Bucks County has been sent back to the federal appeals court by the U.S. Supreme Court for further review. The high court yesterday agreed to consider the steel manufacturer's appeal of an April 1988 ruling by the 3d U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that the company had discriminated against about 8,000 black job applicants. The circuit court ruling also expanded the $12 million in damages levied against USX, formerly U.S. Steel Corp.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Monday opens one of its most anticipated terms, in which the justices could strike down President Obama's health-care law, empower local police to arrest illegal immigrants, and declare an end to affirmative action in colleges and universities. The cases coming before the court "address some of the central issues facing the country," former Solicitor General Walter Dellinger said. The clashes over health care and immigration, he said, "are not mere lawyers' issues, but fundamental questions about how the country is governed.
NEWS
December 22, 2007 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court yesterday refused a request by Foxwoods Casino to speed up its long-stalled request for city approval of its planned slots parlor in the Pennsport section. Without elaborating, the court refused to do for Foxwoods what it did earlier this month for SugarHouse, Philadelphia's other intended casino: bypass City Council and give the go-ahead to break ground. "I'm happy, but I'm not ready to set off fireworks yet," said City Councilman Frank DiCicco, who has opposed both riverfront casino sites as unacceptable.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | By Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
The city's hotel room tax, part of which is earmarked to help pay for the $523 million convention center, has survived a legal challenge before the U.S. Supreme Court. If the high court had found the tax was illegal, it effectively would have killed the center, which is scheduled to open in 1993. The court yesterday dismissed without comment a petition asking it to review a decision by Pennsylvania's Commonwealth Court that upheld the legality of the tax. The petition, filed by attorney Sharon K. Wallis on behalf of a libertarian group, alleged that the tax unconstitutionally discriminates against non- residents and illegally interferes with interstate commerce.
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