CollectionsHigh Holidays
IN THE NEWS

High Holidays

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Yisroel Serebrowski returned to a study table holding a polished black shofar, or ram's horn. He raised it to his lips and blew, sending out a series of high, squeaky notes. He scowled. "I could do better," he said. He blew again, this time puffing his cheeks. This time, the shofar emitted a series of long, plaintive notes that filled the small sanctuary of Torah Links of South Jersey, his center for traditional Torah study in Cherry Hill. "This is the sound of Rosh Hashanah," he said.
FOOD
September 29, 2011 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Every cuisine exists as part of a story. One part of the story told by Jewish foods is of migration, assimilation, and now-vanished worlds. Eastern Europe, Spain, Russia, Yemen, Greece, Iran, Egypt, Syria, Tunisia, and Bukhara in what is now Uzbekistan were all once home to large and vibrant Jewish communities. As these old communities were forced to disband and regroup in the diaspora, the foods of their past became an important link in their new lines. So the story of modern Jewish food is one of a dynamic, multicultural cuisine.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Today, while their parents attend Yom Kippur services, children in kindergarten through second grade at Shir Ami Reform Jewish Congregation will be constructing a new human being. The children will use aluminum-foil mirrors mounted on wooden sticks for some self-reflection and later build a better person by pasting pictures and writing words representing good qualities inside body tracings. The children's High Holidays program is one of the first projects undertaken by the new assistant rabbi, Shira Joseph.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Jewish tradition, the stroke of midnight is a divine moment: the time when the heavens are most open, when the pathway to God is clearest, and pleas for mercy and forgiveness are most easily heard. Late tomorrow evening, with that nightly celestial window about to open, Jews around the region will gather in synagogues, homes and other meeting places to mark Selichot, a service of preparation for the High Holidays that begin next week. A ninth-century rite now experiencing a revival, Selichot is designed to ease congregants into the reflective, penitential mood of the holiest 10 days of the Jewish year.
LIVING
September 17, 2000 | By Shelly Phillips, FOR THE INQUIRER
One by one, men and women at the Jewish senior center wrote their regrets or something they would like to change on a little piece of paper and dropped their small, folded missives into a pot of water. If they could manage, they walked up to the pot, which represented a running stream. If they couldn't, the pot was brought to them. The ceremony took place last year at the David G. Neuman Center in the Northeast. It replicated the tashlikh ritual of casting off sins, a ritual many Jews perform outdoors as part of Rosh Hashanah.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lance Roberts is a Hebrew school dropout. As a youngster, he tried to learn the language in after-school classes at the synagogue. But, hating it, he quit. When his bar mitzvah loomed, his parents had to hire a tutor. "I did my bar mitzvah phonetically and by memorization," said Roberts, a Bala Cynwyd physician. Now that he's 38 and attending services regularly, he said, "I want to learn to read. " So he is back in Hebrew class, this time enthusiastically. Particularly around the High Holidays, which begin Sunday at sundown, adult Jews throughout America embark on a quest to learn or relearn the language of their sacred literature and liturgy.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Denise L. Eger was ordained in 1988, one could not be openly gay and a Reform rabbi. "I was very quiet about it," said Eger, a native of Memphis, Tenn. "My fellow classmates [at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York] knew, and some of my professors, but I didn't wave the rainbow flag. " On Monday, Eger, 55, will become the third woman and first openly gay president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR), the rabbinical arm of the Reform Judaism movement, which is holding is 126th convention at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The trees may have only a hint of color and the temperature is breaking records, but Yom Kippur, which begins tonight, invites reflection on the turning of the seasons. "There is a rhythm to the Jewish calendar year, and that's what so fascinating. It's almost like following the themes of creation. There is a real energy, a flow and pace to it," said Rabbi Richard Address, regional director of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, a Reform organization. Yom Kippur is the Day of Atonement, 24 hours of fasting and prayer that closes the 10-day high holidays period that begins with Rosh Hashanah, the new year.
NEWS
September 14, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having gazed once again at images of the collapsing towers of the World Trade Center, or having watched Wednesday's memorial services, many Americans may find it appropriate that the first anniversary of last year's Sept. 11 attacks fell in the midst of the Jewish "Days of Awe. " This year's Days of Awe - a period of introspection spanning the High Holidays - began at sundown Sept. 6 with Rosh Hashanah and will conclude Monday with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. It is the holiest day of the year in the Jewish liturgical calendar: the day God is said to seal the Book of Life, with the names of who will live and who will die in the year to come.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
Rabbi Elliot Strom wanted to give his congregation a tangible way to put its prayers into action during the Jewish high holidays. So during Rosh Hashana he slipped paper grocery bags under every seat at the Shir Ami synagogue in Newtown Township. By Yom Kippur, on Wednesday, about 300 bags were piled up in the synagogue's entrance. Inside were boxes of cereal and spaghetti and cans of green beans and applesauce. During the holidays, when Jews traditionally take stock of the previous year and resolve to do good in the coming year, giving food to hungry people seemed appropriate, said Debbie Goetz.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Denise L. Eger was ordained in 1988, one could not be openly gay and a Reform rabbi. "I was very quiet about it," said Eger, a native of Memphis, Tenn. "My fellow classmates [at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in New York] knew, and some of my professors, but I didn't wave the rainbow flag. " On Monday, Eger, 55, will become the third woman and first openly gay president of the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR), the rabbinical arm of the Reform Judaism movement, which is holding is 126th convention at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Yisroel Serebrowski returned to a study table holding a polished black shofar, or ram's horn. He raised it to his lips and blew, sending out a series of high, squeaky notes. He scowled. "I could do better," he said. He blew again, this time puffing his cheeks. This time, the shofar emitted a series of long, plaintive notes that filled the small sanctuary of Torah Links of South Jersey, his center for traditional Torah study in Cherry Hill. "This is the sound of Rosh Hashanah," he said.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
To prepare students for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, Rabbi Danielle Stillman thought about the bees. The four hives of pollinators on the Ursinus College organic farm had lessons to teach, about tradition and responsibility. "Honey is one of the symbols of the holiday, to wish for a sweet new year," said Stillman, adviser to the Montgomery County school's Hillel, a Jewish campus organization. But the plight of honeybees, a threatened population that pollinates fruits and vegetables, also offers lessons about the environment for the faithful in a religion that has a lot to say about stewardship of the earth, the rabbi said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice.   On the destructive power of the anonymous note: Thirty years ago, I'd taken a part-time job at a shopping center to supplement my income. I really enjoyed it and the people I met through this job. I was married with three children and I'm not inclined to engage in affairs. An anonymous letter turned up in the mail one day accusing me of "fooling around" with the people at work. Even though my husband was unemployed at the time, I immediately quit the job because he felt someone there had sent it. He immediately became distrustful and accusatory.
FOOD
September 29, 2011 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Every cuisine exists as part of a story. One part of the story told by Jewish foods is of migration, assimilation, and now-vanished worlds. Eastern Europe, Spain, Russia, Yemen, Greece, Iran, Egypt, Syria, Tunisia, and Bukhara in what is now Uzbekistan were all once home to large and vibrant Jewish communities. As these old communities were forced to disband and regroup in the diaspora, the foods of their past became an important link in their new lines. So the story of modern Jewish food is one of a dynamic, multicultural cuisine.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly a year after its celebrity-packed opening, the National Museum of American Jewish History has sharply reduced its attendance expectations and stepped up the call for donations to support its day-to-day operations. The slumping economy and a cold, snowy launch season combined to depress ticket sales at the $142 million gallery overlooking Independence Mall. In addition, officials say, the initial projection of 250,000 visitors annually was unrealistic. They have set a new benchmark of 125,000, which they anticipate reaching by the first anniversary on Nov. 26. The good news on the eve of the High Holidays - starting at sundown Wednesday with Rosh Hashanah - is that attendance has been trending up, according to museum chief executive officer and president Michael Rosenzweig.
NEWS
September 25, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 22 years in the pulpit, Rabbi Jon Cutler has led scores of High Holiday services. He knows the look. Glassy-eyed. Distracted. It says, "When will this be over?" The holiest time on the Jewish calendar draws crowds like no other. Yet a prime opportunity to forge commitment, Cutler says, often yields anything but. So the rabbi had an idea. How about some jazz? He enlisted a quintet of musicians who play in hipster black, including their yarmulkes. Maybe the blue notes and improvisation of jazz would infuse something new into a traditional liturgy for the High Holidays, which end Monday.
NEWS
September 18, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The time has arrived again when Jews around the world greet one another with l'Shana Tovah, the traditional wish for a good new year, or Rosh Hashanah, which begins tonight. But with job losses and the troubled economy taking their toll on synagogue membership, many congregational and denominational leaders worry that 5770, like 5769, will not be a banner year. The High Holidays, which continue tomorrow and Sunday with the two days of Rosh Hashanah and close with Yom Kippur on Sept.
NEWS
January 24, 2007 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A yearlong journey for a reverend and a rabbi ended yesterday. Not only do they pray to the same God, but now they share something else - the rabbi received the reverend's kidney. Last January, at a meeting of the Greater Mount Laurel Interfaith Association, the Rev. Karen Onesti noticed everybody asking Rabbi Andrew Bossov how he was feeling. "Have you been sick?" she asked him. The rabbi explained that he'd had colitis a decade ago, and doctors had put him on an experimental drug.
FOOD
October 6, 2005 | By Beverly Levitt FOR THE INQUIRER
Eti Cohen, the owner of Maxim's restaurant in Cherry Hill, speaks five languages: English, Hebrew, Arabic, Turkish, and Ladino, the Judeo-Spanish language of the Sephardic Jews. Not only is each language embodied in her epicurean melting pot of kosher delicacies, each is a part of the journey her ancestors took during the 15th-century Spanish Inquisition. During that time, Jews in Spain were arrested for koshering their food, celebrating the High Holidays - practicing their religion at all - and so they dispersed to lands as diverse as North Africa, the Middle East, the Mediterranean and South America.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|