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NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sarah Majoras, the New Hope bartender who was found dead in the Delaware and Raritan Canal in January, had a "high level" of alcohol in her blood when she accidentally fell into the waterway, according to the Hunterdon County (N.J.) Prosecutor's Office. "Based upon the totality of the circumstances, including her physical condition, the icy-cold weather conditions, and the lack of suspicious circumstances, Ms. Majoras' death is considered to have been a tragic accident," Prosecutor Anthony Kearns said in a statement released Monday.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia police have committed "an intolerably high level" of civil rights abuses through their stop-and-frisk program, the American Civil Liberties Union said Tuesday, threatening new court action against the city. The state chapter of the ACLU, which has monitored the program for nearly three years, said in its first public report to U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell that nearly half the police stops in 2012 were unconstitutional and that few guns were found in the searches.
SPORTS
August 14, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Entering training camp, Temple appeared to have some questions about its secondary. But during the early portion of practice, coach Matt Rhule seems pleased with the play of his defensive backs, especially his safeties. "The safeties are playing at a high level," Rhule said on Friday after the first of two steamy practices. One of the big changes was moving junior Sean Chandler from cornerback to safety in an attempt to allow him to make even more big plays. Known as "Champ," Chandler made plenty of big plays at corner, with four interceptions, two returned for touchdowns, last year.
SPORTS
April 22, 2010 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember Callahan Bright, the 2005 version? Back then, he was a Harriton High senior, destroyer of blockers and ballcarriers and a prize recruit of Florida State. The defensive tackle was so dominant he was listed as the nation's 14th-best recruit in the Class of 2005, according to Rivals.com. To put Bright's standing in perspective, current Nebraska all-American defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh was ranked 37 spots behind him. Now meet Bright - the updated version. In the last few years, he has worked as a garbage man, served time in jail, and played a season at Division II Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C. While Suh is expected to be among the first three selections in the NFL draft that begins tonight and continues through Saturday, Bright - after academic problems and a scrape with the law - hopes a team gambles on him as a late-round pick.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
Robert H. Winters, superintendent of the Central Bucks School District, has picked up a 9.5 percent salary increase - but not everyone on the school board agreed he should get it. Board members Jacqueline Wolchko and John Toth opposed the raise in a 5-2 vote Thursday night. Winters' salary was increased from $76,000 to $83,200 as he started the third year of his four-year contract. Winters get his raise each year on the anniversary of his first day in the job. "By no means is this a personal reflection on Mr. Winters," said Toth.
NEWS
February 13, 2009
THE VERY interesting group of citizen-professionals selected by city leaders for the Delaware River Waterfront Corp. have many of the same very desirable strengths of the present Fairmount Park commissioners that the city leaders led the charge to abolish on the other side of town. Those strengths are independence and protection from politics applied to that group of highly experienced citizen-professionals, a high level of planning, and earnest and intelligent commitment to the mission.
SPORTS
December 12, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Mario Lemieux, whose comeback has excited his sport as much as Michael Jordan's did for basketball, wants to be hockey's dominant player again. "I'm not coming back to embarrass myself," Lemieux said at a news conference yesterday. "I wouldn't come back unless I thought I could play at a high level and regain the title of the best player in the world. I have the desire and passion to do it. " Lemieux denied his unexpected comeback after a 31/2-year layoff has anything to do with enhancing the finances of the Pittsburgh Penguins franchise he now owns.
SPORTS
February 10, 2010 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
La Salle coach John Giannini announced yesterday that senior guard Ruben Guillandeaux would be out for the remainder of the season because of a stress fracture in his right foot. The 6-foot-5 Guillandeaux will apply to the NCAA for a medical hardship with the hope that he can play his fourth season of eligibility next year. To be granted a medical redshirt, an athlete must have played in fewer than 30 percent of his team's games and none during the second half of the season. Guillandeaux was sidelined after the first four games, in which he averaged 9.5 points and shot 62 percent from three-point distance.
NEWS
January 4, 2002 | By Seth Borenstein and Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal government is extending its nationwide terrorism alert through March 11, but this time is aiming the warning more to police than to the general public, officials said yesterday. The FBI extended the alert "based on the continuing high level of generalized threat information," said Gordon Johndroe, Homeland Security Office spokesman. About 18,000 police agencies nationwide got the word Wednesday via the FBI's Law Enforcement Telecommunications System. High alerts against terrorism have been virtually continuous since Sept.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Nancy Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Lan Van says that she doesn't remember much of her native Vietnam, a country that was in the midst of war when she was born. What she does remember is her grandparents, who were Chinese, teaching her to speak their language, and how she used to walk long distances to school, from the countryside where she lived into Saigon. "My mother and father wanted me to have a good education and they felt that the schools in the city were better," she said. The desire of her father, Mao Khai Van, and her mother, Truong Thuy Van, to provide a good education has paid off for Lan Van, who will be graduating at the top of her class from Penn Wood High School on June 16. She will be giving the school's valedictorian address - no small accomplishment for someone who did not speak the language fluently until four years ago. Lan Van came to the William Penn School District in 1980, two years after leaving Vietnam for Hong Kong en route to the United States.
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NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
As the new school year begins, teens and parents gear up for new classes, new experiences and new responsibilities. What they might not be prepared for, however, is identifying and coping with stress. "Kids can be hurting and parents don't always recognize it," says David Palmiter, professor of psychology at Marywood University in Scranton. "Teens don't want to stress out already stressed parents. Or they worry if they tell parents that they are stressed the parents might say, OK, no cell phone or going out on Friday night - they could lose their autonomy.
SPORTS
August 14, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Entering training camp, Temple appeared to have some questions about its secondary. But during the early portion of practice, coach Matt Rhule seems pleased with the play of his defensive backs, especially his safeties. "The safeties are playing at a high level," Rhule said on Friday after the first of two steamy practices. One of the big changes was moving junior Sean Chandler from cornerback to safety in an attempt to allow him to make even more big plays. Known as "Champ," Chandler made plenty of big plays at corner, with four interceptions, two returned for touchdowns, last year.
SPORTS
February 14, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Darryl Reynolds stood out for Villanova in the three games he started while senior center Daniel Ochefu was sidelined with a concussion, highlighted by a career game of 19 points and 10 rebounds in a road victory at Providence last Saturday. But coach Jay Wright might have liked Reynolds' performance in the Wildcats' next game at DePaul - the program's first ever as the nation's No. 1 team - even more. Reynolds, a 6-foot-8 junior from Lower Merion High, kept up his level of play with Ochefu back in the lineup, contributing 14 points and six rebounds Tuesday in an 86-59 victory.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
The table below shows the proportion of children under 7 (under 6 in New Jersey) whose tests showed elevated blood lead levels in selected Pennsylvania and New Jersey cities in 2014. Cities were selected for analysis because of their risk factors for lead poisoning: high proportions of children under 7, families with low income, and older housing. In Flint, Mich., 3,340 children under the age of 6 were tested in 2015. Of those children, 112, or 3.3 percent, had elevated levels of lead.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The abrupt ouster last week of the new president and chairman of the Devon Horse Show had volunteers and supporters spinning. Was it a hostile takeover, or was it democracy in action? "I really would like to get some sort of better explanation," said Mary Talbutt, a show volunteer and lifelong horse rider. The emergency vote in a hastily called and confidential meeting Monday marked another twist in a year of unusual upheaval for the century-old Main Line institution.
SPORTS
October 26, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
When John Robertson needed shoulder surgery in the offseason, it allowed him to spend some time on the sidelines last spring and watch his Villanova teammates closer than ever before. "I got a different perspective," Robertson said. "I was pretty much able to watch the offense from the outside. I saw so many different things that I hadn't seen playing. I was like, 'alright, this is what I have to do.' " Whatever it was that Robinson saw, it's paying dividends. Set to lead the fifth-ranked Wildcats (6-1)
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The water contamination that has triggered the shutdown of five public water wells in Gloucester County has been found at even higher levels in several private wells. Tests commissioned by the company believed responsible for the spread of perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) show that some private wells in West Deptford used for drinking water have concentrations of the chemical higher than what was found in Paulsboro's public supply. A state Department of Environmental Protection report has described Paulsboro's levels as "higher than reported elsewhere in the world" in drinking water studies.
SPORTS
February 12, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
OAKLAND, Calif. - If the 76ers were a group of boxers, the blood still would have been oozing out last night from all the damage they received on Sunday night at the hands of the Los Angeles Clippers. The NBA schedule shows no mercy and Sixers coach Brett Brown wasn't looking for any. In fact, he was happy that his team was back on the floor to face the Golden State Warriors fewer than 24 hours after Sunday's 123-78 shellacking. "We definitely talk about it, I think it's a great learning example," Brown said.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By Margie Mason, Associated Press
PYONGYANG, North Korea - After months of ignoring Chinese warnings to give up nuclear weapons, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent a high-level confidant to Beijing on Wednesday in a possible effort to mend strained ties with his country's most important ally and a sign that he may be giving diplomacy a chance. The trip by Vice Marshal Choe Ryong Hae, a senior Workers' Party official and the military's top political officer, is taking place as tensions ease somewhat on the Korean Peninsula after near-daily vows from Pyongyang to attack Washington and Seoul in March and April.
NEWS
April 7, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett on Friday moved to fill two vacancies in the upper echelons of his administration. Corbett said he would nominate acting Health Secretary Michael Wolf to permanently fill the post vacated last fall, and he tapped lawyer Michael Sprow to serve as acting state inspector general. Wolf, 46, of Enola, a Harrisburg suburb, was director of worldwide public affairs and policy for pharmaceutical giant Pfizer before joining the Corbett administration in May 2011 as a top deputy to then-Health Secretary Eli N. Avila.
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