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High Line

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NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - It's easy to find the new entrance to the High Line park. Just follow the stream of people in skinny jeans and espadrilles heading west from the subways around Penn Station. The parade becomes a throng as you near 10th Avenue, once a lonely outpost where the blocks were lined with trucks and streetwalkers and not much else. The Pied Piper of Parks opened its second section only last week, extending its reach to 30th Street, but the surrounding streets have already assumed the vibe of a real neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The golden summer morning was perfect for a stroll on the Reading Viaduct, Philadelphia's answer to New York's High Line . The difference is that Philadelphia's version has no architect-designed staircases or glass elevators to bring visitors up to the postindustrial wonderland. To get inside, you have to venture up an overgrown ramp, bushwhack your way through chest-high weeds, then shimmy through a large opening in a chain-link security fence. Technically, it's trespassing. "I've been here several times," Brian Ewing, a 37-year-old Philadelphia schoolteacher, told me the other day as he showed a friend the drill.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Backers of a plan to transform unused rail lines north of Center City into an elevated park say it will draw private investment to blighted areas. That may already be happening at 990 Spring Garden, which sits near a stretch of the planned Viaduct Rail Park that runs through a rundown industrial district along Callowhill Street east of Broad. Owners of the 88-year-old building, now mostly home to city offices, are turning it into loft-style suites to attract creatively minded companies and technology firms.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Let New York gloat about completing the High Line. Philadelphia is about to debut a linear park that might be even more impressive: the Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk. As wonderful as the High Line is, it merely allows people to wend their way through Manhattan a few stories above its bustling streets. When the latest segment of the Schuylkill Banks trail opens to the public Thursday, you'll be able to walk on water, under the glittering gaze of the Center City skyline. The new 15-foot-wide walkway dives into the river at Locust Street, and doesn't crawl back onto dry land until it reaches the South Street Bridge, a joyous journey more than 2,000 feet long.
NEWS
October 28, 2009 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
The High Line is a Depression-era elevated rail freight line that runs for almost a mile and a half above street-level and along and through buildings in a part of lower Manhattan that once bustled with factories and warehouses. Active for about 50 years, the steel viaduct was abandoned by the 1980s and became an overgrown secret garden for graffiti artists and urban explorers. In the last decade, that heady New York mix of citizens and celebrities came together to raise awareness and cash to save the High Line, which was threatened with demolition.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
A decade or so of persistent community activism is paying off in the Callowhill warehouse district, which is on its way to carving a vibrant residential identity from the city's industrial past. The city and state set aside $5.3 million to convert a quarter-mile Reading Railroad spur into a park. Residents and the Center City District have raised $70,000 on their own, a strong signal of the commitment they would provide once a park is built. Foundation grants are expected as well to help cover the $8.6 million cost of the first phase.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When computer engineer Jim Nasto started working at the Philadelphia Navy Yard about a decade ago, the 1,200-acre property was a virtual desert of vacant industrial buildings and abandoned parade grounds. Many of those buildings now make up Urban Outfitters' headquarters, while the vast open spaces are being shaped into office parks inhabited by such corporations as GlaxoSmithKline. "I love it," said Nasto, 29, a research contractor for the U.S. Navy, as he tossed a bocce ball in a landscaped park that opened last month.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Neighborhood volunteers first began cultivating the idea of converting the ruins of the Reading Viaduct into Philadelphia's own elevated park more than a decade ago. After years of organizing, raising money, and drafting proposals, their efforts - and those of the politicians and professional planners who joined the cause - finally appear ready to bear fruit. Without fanfare, the city and the state have included millions of dollars in their latest budgets toward the first phase of the project: transforming the quarter-mile railroad "spur" that curves through the city's burgeoning Loft District and dead-ends onto North Broad Street.
TRAVEL
March 27, 2011 | By Jim Buchta, MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE
NEW YORK - Gulls traced invisible curlicues on a blue summer sky. The hammock I lay in swayed in a cool summer breeze. Then the Staten Island Ferry hummed past, rousing me from my catnap and reminding me that I was in New York City, on the south end of Governors Island. Hammocks, shady bike paths, and a sandy beach weren't what I expected during a summer visit to the city, but this 172-acre oasis just off the tip of Manhattan was a perfect escape from the crowds of the city. I found similar respite at the High Line, another relatively new park that's built on old railroad tracks 30 feet above the busy street.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the subterranean shadows, the models scurry at the sound of people tromping their way. They won't say why they chose this abandoned SEPTA tunnel for a fashion shoot, though the cavernous space does offer a darkly glamorous backdrop. Above them, traffic zooms by on Pennsylvania Avenue, just steps from the Art Museum. The noise of cars and trucks barely penetrates the thick walls of the passage. On this particular Saturday, a group of about 40 people were drawn here - armed with flashlights to avoid rocks and empty soda bottles in the blackness - by Paul vanMeter, a hyperkinetic professional gardener.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The golden summer morning was perfect for a stroll on the Reading Viaduct, Philadelphia's answer to New York's High Line . The difference is that Philadelphia's version has no architect-designed staircases or glass elevators to bring visitors up to the postindustrial wonderland. To get inside, you have to venture up an overgrown ramp, bushwhack your way through chest-high weeds, then shimmy through a large opening in a chain-link security fence. Technically, it's trespassing. "I've been here several times," Brian Ewing, a 37-year-old Philadelphia schoolteacher, told me the other day as he showed a friend the drill.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Backers of a plan to transform unused rail lines north of Center City into an elevated park say it will draw private investment to blighted areas. That may already be happening at 990 Spring Garden, which sits near a stretch of the planned Viaduct Rail Park that runs through a rundown industrial district along Callowhill Street east of Broad. Owners of the 88-year-old building, now mostly home to city offices, are turning it into loft-style suites to attract creatively minded companies and technology firms.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
SEPTA WILL hold an online lottery Wednesday for special passes for the Norristown High Speed Line and trolley routes 101 and 102 during the papal visit, the transit agency announced yesterday. The special passes cost $10 apiece and will be valid from Sept. 26-28. Riders will be required to have a special pass that weekend because of the expected volume of passengers. SEPTA said it has 20,000 passes available for the high-speed line and 5,600 apiece for the two trolley routes. Like the Regional Rail pass lottery held earlier this week, customers will be able to register through SEPTA's website on Wednesday from 12:01 a.m. until 11:59 p.m. All valid submissions will have the same chances of winning, regardless of what time they are submitted, the agency said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It has been 15 years since the Philadelphia Navy Yard was turned into a suburban-style office park. Lured by the promise of free parking and easy highway access, dozens of companies now make their home there, employing some 12,000 people. The development is widely considered an economic success. If your only experience of the Navy Yard has been a fleeting glimpse from I-95, it may come as a surprise to learn that it is also a design success. Not only has the Navy Yard moved beyond the bland office-park model by creating a formal street plan with real sidewalks, but it also is producing some of the best architecture in Philadelphia - better than most of what we're seeing in Center City or University City.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When computer engineer Jim Nasto started working at the Philadelphia Navy Yard about a decade ago, the 1,200-acre property was a virtual desert of vacant industrial buildings and abandoned parade grounds. Many of those buildings now make up Urban Outfitters' headquarters, while the vast open spaces are being shaped into office parks inhabited by such corporations as GlaxoSmithKline. "I love it," said Nasto, 29, a research contractor for the U.S. Navy, as he tossed a bocce ball in a landscaped park that opened last month.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
NEW YORK - The public may go gaga for the museum designs of Frank Gehry, but museum directors prefer Renzo Piano, the Italian minimalist who just completed an expansive new home for the Whitney Museum of American Art overlooking the High Line. Since partnering with Richard Rogers in the '70s on the crayon-colored Pompidou Center in Paris, Piano's firm has gone on to create well over two dozen art museums. In America, the notches on his belt include major designs in Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, and Fort Worth, Texas.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Let New York gloat about completing the High Line. Philadelphia is about to debut a linear park that might be even more impressive: the Schuylkill Banks Boardwalk. As wonderful as the High Line is, it merely allows people to wend their way through Manhattan a few stories above its bustling streets. When the latest segment of the Schuylkill Banks trail opens to the public Thursday, you'll be able to walk on water, under the glittering gaze of the Center City skyline. The new 15-foot-wide walkway dives into the river at Locust Street, and doesn't crawl back onto dry land until it reaches the South Street Bridge, a joyous journey more than 2,000 feet long.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
A decade or so of persistent community activism is paying off in the Callowhill warehouse district, which is on its way to carving a vibrant residential identity from the city's industrial past. The city and state set aside $5.3 million to convert a quarter-mile Reading Railroad spur into a park. Residents and the Center City District have raised $70,000 on their own, a strong signal of the commitment they would provide once a park is built. Foundation grants are expected as well to help cover the $8.6 million cost of the first phase.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Neighborhood volunteers first began cultivating the idea of converting the ruins of the Reading Viaduct into Philadelphia's own elevated park more than a decade ago. After years of organizing, raising money, and drafting proposals, their efforts - and those of the politicians and professional planners who joined the cause - finally appear ready to bear fruit. Without fanfare, the city and the state have included millions of dollars in their latest budgets toward the first phase of the project: transforming the quarter-mile railroad "spur" that curves through the city's burgeoning Loft District and dead-ends onto North Broad Street.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A passion for art, vintage railroads, and little-seen places has inspired a local photographer to create a dramatic exhibit of one of the most hidden of hidden gems in the heart of the city. Lensman Bob Bruhin's "Secrets of the City Branch," on display at Brewerytown's High Point Cafe, offers documentary and artistic views of an old rail line through the Art Museum area and the Spring Garden section that some have seen as untapped potential. "One of the things I love to do is find pieces of the city that people aren't looking at, or that people walk by all the time and don't even realize actually exist," said Bruhin, 54, who lives in Mount Airy and works as a Web developer.
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