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High Risk

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NEWS
June 9, 1989 | By Douglas Jehl, Los Angeles Times Inquirer staff writer Marian Uhlman contributed to this article
Residents who live near 205 pollution-spewing industrial plants in 37 states may face more than a 1-in-1,000 chance of getting cancer from the emissions - far above the risk level regarded as acceptable by the Environmental Protection Agency, according to preliminary government data released by Rep. Henry Waxman (D., Calif.). However, EPA Administrator William K. Reilly warned that estimates for any particular plant or location might be severely flawed because the data were not intended to assess public-health risks at individual sites.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An eight-month federal study of the danger posed by pollution in Chester has concluded that the health risks caused by environmental hazards are unacceptably high for virtually all residents. The Environmental Protection Agency study, which agency officials called the first of its kind in the United States, set about in early April to assess as many environmental risk factors to the population as possible. It was commissioned because of a clustering of environmentally hazardous industries in Chester and because of concerns that Chester's residents were the victims of "environmental racism.
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | By Larry Atkins
My grandmother celebrated her 97th birthday this March. That's a pretty good accomplishment, but there are plenty of people who live until their 90s or even older. How many, though, have undergone and survived double-bypass heart surgery at age 95? Needless to say, she's a very strong woman. And she was fortunate to have doctors who believed in her strength and who weren't forced to assume that this high-risk operation wasn't worth doing or wasn't economically feasible merely because of her age. It's easy to talk about Medicare cuts or rationed health care when it's in the abstract.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Insurance Department announced Wednesday that it had submitted a plan to achieve one of the provisions of the new national health-overhaul legislation: creation of a special insurance program for people who can't buy insurance because they're already sick. People with preexisting conditions such as heart disease, cancer, or major mental illness would be able to buy into the proposed high-risk insurance pool for about what healthy people would pay, up to $5,616 a year. The problem is that those payments, plus $160 million in federal funding through 2013, can provide insurance for only about 5,100 people in a state where 800,000 are uninsured.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | By Art Caplan
The United Nations World Health Organization has begun testing possible HIV vaccines, but partly because the first trials are in Thailand, the program is controversial. The need for a vaccine is especially pressing since the AIDS epidemic is exploding in many of the world's poorest nations. Yet many people say that testing vaccines in poor nations is unethical. They are wrong. Many of us still think of acquired immune deficiency syndrome as somehow peculiarly an American disease.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | By ROBERT J. WEIL
The AIDS scare is back. This time it threatens to undo a decade of scientific investigation, public education, and social understanding. Recent reports of physicians with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), of potential transfer of virus to patients, and legislative fiat by the U.S. Senate to prevent and make criminal such transmission, have brought AIDS back into the public forum. These reports, however, serve less to educate than to obfuscate and tend more to promote fear than to inform.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
He's just 2 1/2 inches long, with little fingers and a heartbeat that flickers on the ultrasound screen. He flip-flops around in his mother's womb, such a tiny being that she can't feel his movement. Yet, Virginia Connolly, 35, eagerly tracks her son's every turn. With the black and white pictures of the ultrasound screen, she quips, he'll have a photo album started even before birth. Through a procedure available in Chester County only at the Chester County Hospital, and performed by a team from the Pennsylvania Hospital, Connolly was reassured early in her pregnancy that her son would be born without genetic abnormalities.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
In a recommendation that could affect millions, the Public Health Service recommended yesterday that all people in high-risk groups undergo periodic blood tests to check for infection by the AIDS virus. While there remains no cure for AIDS, agency officials said, research over the past year shows that virtually all people in high-risk groups who repeatedly test positive to the blood test can infect others. Thus, they said, people with verified positive results can be counseled on how to avoid spreading the deadly disease to others, particularly sexual partners.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Health-care professionals in New Jersey could be fined $500 for giving the flu vaccine to someone not in a high-risk group, under an order expected to be issued as early as today. Gov. McGreevey yesterday signed a law directing the commissioner of the Department of Health and Senior Services to issue the order spelling out who can get the vaccine during this season's shortage. The order, which was being finalized yesterday, also would give the commissioner the power to redirect shipments of the vaccine to ensure it reaches those who need it most.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
U.S. ATTORNEY General Eric Holder, who was in town to observe Philadelphia's Supervision to Aid Re-entry (STAR) program for ex-offenders, learned two new phrases in federal court yesterday: "boo lovin' " and "hugged up. " When U.S. District Judge L. Felipe Restrepo asked STAR participant Rashaan Bates why he had missed a recent probation meeting, Bates' response was: "I was boo lovin.' " When asked to clarify, Bates said: "I was hugged up," making...
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NEWS
November 7, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
U.S. ATTORNEY General Eric Holder, who was in town to observe Philadelphia's Supervision to Aid Re-entry (STAR) program for ex-offenders, learned two new phrases in federal court yesterday: "boo lovin' " and "hugged up. " When U.S. District Judge L. Felipe Restrepo asked STAR participant Rashaan Bates why he had missed a recent probation meeting, Bates' response was: "I was boo lovin.' " When asked to clarify, Bates said: "I was hugged up," making...
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The Philadelphia region is home to some well-respected municipal-bond-investing experts, among them David Kotok, chief investment officer of Cumberland Advisors in Vineland, N.J., and Tom Kozlik, of Janney Montgomery Scott in Center City. We checked in with them to find out the skinny on investing in munis right now, after Detroit's bankruptcy filing sounded a wake-up call across the market. In recent days, Kotok has been advancing a war of words with the Cassandra of muni bonds, Meredith Whitney, who famously appeared on 60 Minutes in 2010 predicting an avalanche of bankruptcies across American cities.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials granted an 18-month extension Thursday to a Doylestown program that has earned national attention for its efforts to keep chronically ill seniors out of the hospital. Health Quality Partners, a nonprofit that arranges for nurses to make periodic visits to the homes of 560 seniors in the suburbs and beyond, had been told in December that its federal funding would run out at the end of this month. But officials at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have changed course, saying the program deserved more time to show whether it had nailed the central challenge of 21st-century U.S. health care: improving quality while cutting costs.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Updated preliminary flood maps issued Monday by the Federal Emergency Management Agency drastically reduce the area included in high-risk flood zones in three New Jersey Shore counties and one northern county - a move that has some homeowners sighing in relief. "This is wonderful news. . . . I can breathe a little easier now," said Brigantine resident Laurel Haeser, whose property overlooking a golf course had previously been included in the so-called V zone, or High Risk Velocity.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Eating fish is good for your heart, but taking fish-oil capsules does not help people at high risk of heart problems who are already taking medicines to prevent them, a large study in Italy found. The work makes clearer who does and does not benefit from taking supplements of the good oils found in fish such as salmon, tuna, and sardines. Previous studies have suggested that fish-oil capsules could lower heart risks in people with heart failure or who have already suffered a heart attack.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 500 people from the region joined thousands of protesters in Washington Sunday, calling for strong action on climate change and a stop to the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would transport oil from Canada to the Gulf Coast. Opponents say it would worsen climate change by encouraging further development of the Tar Sands oil resource. They spent several hours in the bitter cold and a strong wind cheering, waving signs, listening to speakers and marching around the White House, although President Obama was in Florida for a golf game.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Discovery Laboratories Inc., of Warrington, Bucks County, said Friday that W. Thomas Amick, 70, had resigned as chief executive officer and chairman of the board. John Cooper, 54, who was executive vice president and chief financial officer, will now serve as president, CFO and join the board of directors. After years of work, Discovery Labs got FDA approval in 2012 for Surfaxin, a medication to help prevent respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants who are at high risk of developing RDS. The company will begin selling that in the second quarter of 2013.
SPORTS
December 14, 2012
BACK IN AUGUST, when we sitting around in shorts and sipping cold beers, the two biggest sporting concerns were whether the Phillies were going to make a playoff push and, for fantasy owners, who should be the first running back drafted after Arian Foster, LeSean McCoy or Darren McFadden? Turns out neither the Phils, McCoy nor McFadden deserved our optimism. Oh well. It's fantasy awards time again and we'd like to hear from you. Fill out the ballot on this page or online and either mail, email or fax in your picks.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Julhas Alam, Associated Press
DHAKA, Bangladesh - Fire raced through a garment factory that supplies major retailers in the West, killing at least 112 people, many of whom were trapped by the flames because the eight-story building lacked emergency exits, an official said Sunday. The blaze broke out late Saturday at a factory operated just outside Bangladesh's capital of Dhaka by Tazreen Fashions Ltd., a subsidiary of the Tuba Group, which makes products for Wal-Mart and other companies in the United States and Europe.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - Mammograms aimed at finding breast cancer might actually raise the chances of developing it in young women whose genes put them at higher risk for the disease, a study by leading European cancer agencies suggests. The added radiation from mammograms and other types of tests with chest radiation might be especially harmful to them, and an MRI is probably a safer method of screening women under 30 who are at high risk because of gene mutations, the authors conclude. The study cannot prove a link between the radiation and breast cancer, but it is one of the biggest ever to look at the issue.
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