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High Risk

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NEWS
June 9, 1989 | By Douglas Jehl, Los Angeles Times Inquirer staff writer Marian Uhlman contributed to this article
Residents who live near 205 pollution-spewing industrial plants in 37 states may face more than a 1-in-1,000 chance of getting cancer from the emissions - far above the risk level regarded as acceptable by the Environmental Protection Agency, according to preliminary government data released by Rep. Henry Waxman (D., Calif.). However, EPA Administrator William K. Reilly warned that estimates for any particular plant or location might be severely flawed because the data were not intended to assess public-health risks at individual sites.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An eight-month federal study of the danger posed by pollution in Chester has concluded that the health risks caused by environmental hazards are unacceptably high for virtually all residents. The Environmental Protection Agency study, which agency officials called the first of its kind in the United States, set about in early April to assess as many environmental risk factors to the population as possible. It was commissioned because of a clustering of environmentally hazardous industries in Chester and because of concerns that Chester's residents were the victims of "environmental racism.
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | By Larry Atkins
My grandmother celebrated her 97th birthday this March. That's a pretty good accomplishment, but there are plenty of people who live until their 90s or even older. How many, though, have undergone and survived double-bypass heart surgery at age 95? Needless to say, she's a very strong woman. And she was fortunate to have doctors who believed in her strength and who weren't forced to assume that this high-risk operation wasn't worth doing or wasn't economically feasible merely because of her age. It's easy to talk about Medicare cuts or rationed health care when it's in the abstract.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Insurance Department announced Wednesday that it had submitted a plan to achieve one of the provisions of the new national health-overhaul legislation: creation of a special insurance program for people who can't buy insurance because they're already sick. People with preexisting conditions such as heart disease, cancer, or major mental illness would be able to buy into the proposed high-risk insurance pool for about what healthy people would pay, up to $5,616 a year. The problem is that those payments, plus $160 million in federal funding through 2013, can provide insurance for only about 5,100 people in a state where 800,000 are uninsured.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | By Art Caplan
The United Nations World Health Organization has begun testing possible HIV vaccines, but partly because the first trials are in Thailand, the program is controversial. The need for a vaccine is especially pressing since the AIDS epidemic is exploding in many of the world's poorest nations. Yet many people say that testing vaccines in poor nations is unethical. They are wrong. Many of us still think of acquired immune deficiency syndrome as somehow peculiarly an American disease.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | By ROBERT J. WEIL
The AIDS scare is back. This time it threatens to undo a decade of scientific investigation, public education, and social understanding. Recent reports of physicians with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), of potential transfer of virus to patients, and legislative fiat by the U.S. Senate to prevent and make criminal such transmission, have brought AIDS back into the public forum. These reports, however, serve less to educate than to obfuscate and tend more to promote fear than to inform.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
He's just 2 1/2 inches long, with little fingers and a heartbeat that flickers on the ultrasound screen. He flip-flops around in his mother's womb, such a tiny being that she can't feel his movement. Yet, Virginia Connolly, 35, eagerly tracks her son's every turn. With the black and white pictures of the ultrasound screen, she quips, he'll have a photo album started even before birth. Through a procedure available in Chester County only at the Chester County Hospital, and performed by a team from the Pennsylvania Hospital, Connolly was reassured early in her pregnancy that her son would be born without genetic abnormalities.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you were at high risk for a deadly, untreatable disease, would you want to know it? Would you want to join a clinical trial? Alzheimer's researchers are hoping that a lot of people are so eager to find a cure that they will answer yes to both those questions. GeneMatch, an ambitious, national effort to recruit people at high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease, was launched Tuesday by the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and will include a key role for University of Pennsylvania researchers.
REAL_ESTATE
June 27, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
When we lived in Mount Airy, I once joked that in the event all the glaciers melted, we'd have beachfront property. Since my efforts to be the Henny Youngman of climate change, we've had some serious weather: Hurricane Sandy in 2012, which followed Irene in 2011. The greatest damage in New Jersey and New York was caused by storm surge - especially in New York City, even with precautions taken after the extensive flooding caused by Hurricane Irene. A report by financial-services company CoreLogic outlines the potential risk of damage from hurricane storm-surge inundation on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
In a recommendation that could affect millions, the Public Health Service recommended yesterday that all people in high-risk groups undergo periodic blood tests to check for infection by the AIDS virus. While there remains no cure for AIDS, agency officials said, research over the past year shows that virtually all people in high-risk groups who repeatedly test positive to the blood test can infect others. Thus, they said, people with verified positive results can be counseled on how to avoid spreading the deadly disease to others, particularly sexual partners.
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REAL_ESTATE
June 27, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
When we lived in Mount Airy, I once joked that in the event all the glaciers melted, we'd have beachfront property. Since my efforts to be the Henny Youngman of climate change, we've had some serious weather: Hurricane Sandy in 2012, which followed Irene in 2011. The greatest damage in New Jersey and New York was caused by storm surge - especially in New York City, even with precautions taken after the extensive flooding caused by Hurricane Irene. A report by financial-services company CoreLogic outlines the potential risk of damage from hurricane storm-surge inundation on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.
SPORTS
June 18, 2016 | By Rick O'Brien, STAFF WRITER
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Brian Verratti pretty much summed up Neumann-Goretti's baseball season. "We started out the year as the area's top-ranked team. We got off to a slow start and dropped out of the rankings, and then we came on strong at the end to accomplish our goals," the senior centerfielder and leadoff man said. Verratti and the Saints, written off by some after a 2-5 start, captured the program's first state title with a 3-0 blanking of District 6's Bishop McCort in a rain-delayed PIAA Class 2A final Thursday at Penn State's Medlar Field at Lubrano Park.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
On paper it seemed pretty simple. The state gave a newly created venture capital fund $1.5 million to invest in small minority businesses in Philadelphia. Those businesses would share their profits with the fund and the money could be used to invest in more businesses. But 20 years and several lawsuits later, taxpayers lost on their bet. Of $1.25 million invested in 14 businesses between 2004 and 2006, the city recovered only $225,000. Nine of the businesses paid nothing back.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Citing the likelihood of another impasse over the next state budget, Moody's Investor Services has affirmed its negative credit rating for the Philadelphia School District. Moody's highlighted the district's recent efforts to stabilize the finances of the city's schools. But the credit opinion released Friday said that the continued "Ba3" rating for the district's debt "reflects the continued uncertainty surrounding" the state budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 and the potential impact it could have on the district's finances and ability to borrow money.
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
A new international study suggests that the cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins may be warranted not only for people at high risk of heart disease, but also for those at intermediate risk. Yet whether doctors will recommend the daily pills for these millions of additional patients remains to be seen. The drugs appeared to reduce the number of cardiovascular "events" - a composite measure of heart attack, strokes, and deaths - but the researchers had to follow an awful lot of people to see the reduction, they reported Saturday in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you were at high risk for a deadly, untreatable disease, would you want to know it? Would you want to join a clinical trial? Alzheimer's researchers are hoping that a lot of people are so eager to find a cure that they will answer yes to both those questions. GeneMatch, an ambitious, national effort to recruit people at high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease, was launched Tuesday by the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and will include a key role for University of Pennsylvania researchers.
SPORTS
January 22, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
SPECULATION around the Flyers is growing that defenseman Kimmo Timonen may return to the ice, after all, this season. Timonen, 39, who has been on injured reserve this season due to blood clots, has maintained he would rather retire with his skates on than shoes. So far, after days of deliberation, doctors have not yet told him, or the Flyers, that he cannot resume his career. The Flyers have consulted with multiple doctors and experts since CT scans revealed last Friday that one of the multiple blood clots discovered in his body in August has not yet been fully reabsorbed into his system.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
U.S. ATTORNEY General Eric Holder, who was in town to observe Philadelphia's Supervision to Aid Re-entry (STAR) program for ex-offenders, learned two new phrases in federal court yesterday: "boo lovin' " and "hugged up. " When U.S. District Judge L. Felipe Restrepo asked STAR participant Rashaan Bates why he had missed a recent probation meeting, Bates' response was: "I was boo lovin.' " When asked to clarify, Bates said: "I was hugged up," making...
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The Philadelphia region is home to some well-respected municipal-bond-investing experts, among them David Kotok, chief investment officer of Cumberland Advisors in Vineland, N.J., and Tom Kozlik, of Janney Montgomery Scott in Center City. We checked in with them to find out the skinny on investing in munis right now, after Detroit's bankruptcy filing sounded a wake-up call across the market. In recent days, Kotok has been advancing a war of words with the Cassandra of muni bonds, Meredith Whitney, who famously appeared on 60 Minutes in 2010 predicting an avalanche of bankruptcies across American cities.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials granted an 18-month extension Thursday to a Doylestown program that has earned national attention for its efforts to keep chronically ill seniors out of the hospital. Health Quality Partners, a nonprofit that arranges for nurses to make periodic visits to the homes of 560 seniors in the suburbs and beyond, had been told in December that its federal funding would run out at the end of this month. But officials at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have changed course, saying the program deserved more time to show whether it had nailed the central challenge of 21st-century U.S. health care: improving quality while cutting costs.
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