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High Risk

ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1986 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"Ten Percent Revue" at the Walnut Street Theater, Studio 5, through Oct. 26. Featuring Tom Wilson Weinberg, Jon Arterton, Jenifer Firestone, Elliot Pilshaw, Helena Snow. 'Ten Percent Revue," the gay-lesbian musical that opened last night at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 5 for a two-week run, is an exhilarating evening with the warm heart of an old-time hoofer and the big city brains of a Talking Head. Philadelphia-spawned composer and lyricist Tom Wilson Weinberg writes songs like the legendary Broadway guys used to write songs in the '30s and '40s.
NEWS
July 28, 2010
Four years after industry officials persuaded Congress and the Department of Homeland Security to accept watered-down regulations on securing chemical plants from terrorists, they're urging federal officials to once again kick the can down the road. One proposal in the Senate would even renew these flawed rules for five more years. That's an imprudent strategy, though, for safeguarding millions of Americans from the risks posed by hundreds of plants where dangerous chemicals are processed or in use. Plant safety rules that will expire in October simply aren't doing the job - which is why Congress must strengthen them now. For instance, even the mandated government inspection of high-risk facilities lags far behind schedule.
NEWS
March 18, 2005
Son was responsible for checking on father In a March 16 article on the discovery of a man 10 days dead ("Questions linger over man's death"), the deceased's son railed against the manager of the West Chester residential complex where his elderly father had lived. "We're furious about what happened," he said. "Somebody ought to be responsible. " I agree. And who better than one of the old man's seven children. How difficult is it to call your old dad once a day? Did he live too far from his children for casual drop-in visits?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In case you were wondering - and any sane person would - a climber making his way up the sheer and treacherous ice face of the Delphine Glacier in British Columbia without a rope explains, "I want to get places where no human has been before. " Extreme, the latest and one of the giddiest Imax releases at the Franklin Institute, is full of breathtaking shots of high-risk behavior and helpful comments from those who dare on why they do it. The film covers the most extreme of the extreme sports and activities, far beyond the fodder ESPN uses to fill its daytime schedule.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Despite repeated assertions that Gov. Casey wants to crack down on child abuse, his key plan for prevention is followed in his new welfare-budget proposal with this symbol: $0. Nevertheless, Public Welfare Secretary John F. White Jr. said yesterday that the administration was continuing to negotiate with lawmakers and county officials on legislation that would allow social workers to intervene more quickly during crises. White told members of the House Appropriations Committee that the two sides were "close to agreement" on a bill that would expand the definition of abuse to include children who had not been harmed, but who were "at risk.
NEWS
November 2, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the season of falling leaves, pumpkins and apple cider . . . and flu shots. While the flu generally makes its appearance this month or next, it peaks in January and February before declining as spring arrives. Now is the time for vaccinations for those at risk of flu complications, because it takes the body several weeks after vaccination to build up enough antibodies to fight off flu. Shots are especially important for people over age 65 because while flu for most people means just a few days of muscle-aching feverish misery, it can also be dangerous.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Discovery Laboratories Inc., of Warrington, Bucks County, said Friday that W. Thomas Amick, 70, had resigned as chief executive officer and chairman of the board. John Cooper, 54, who was executive vice president and chief financial officer, will now serve as president, CFO and join the board of directors. After years of work, Discovery Labs got FDA approval in 2012 for Surfaxin, a medication to help prevent respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants who are at high risk of developing RDS. The company will begin selling that in the second quarter of 2013.
NEWS
July 20, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health departments handled a deluge of calls from residents who lost power. Agencies checked on high-risk clients. Hospitals turned to generators. The fierce storms that tore through the region Tuesday night left thousands without electricity through yesterday and sternly tested the emergency response plans of medical institutions and health and aging departments. All in all, the region appeared to pass without problems. "The good news is that the generators worked" at Paoli Hospital, said Frieda Schmidt, a spokeswoman for Main Line Health, which includes Paoli.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"On July 29, 1994, my 7-year-old daughter crossed the street," began Maureen Kanka as she described the rape and murder of Megan in a voice that did not waver during a 90-minute talk. It is a story that has become well-known across the country, and one that has led state after state to enact so-called Megan's Laws, requiring convicted sex offenders to notify authorities of their whereabouts. Kanka's daughter was murdered by Jesse Timmendequas, a neighbor who, unbeknownst to the neighborhood, was a convicted sex offender.
NEWS
August 26, 2010
An outbreak of salmonella poisoning that has sickened hundreds of people who ate bad eggs should prompt the Senate to stop sitting on legislation to give the Food and Drug Administration more clout. But instead of its watered-down version that has been collecting dust, the Senate should adopt a House bill passed a year ago. More than 1,300 recent salmonella cases have been linked to contaminated eggs. FDA officials say those illnesses, and the subsequent voluntary recall of a half-billion eggs, might have been avoided if it had the power to inspect agribusinesses before an outbreak and to order product recalls when necessary.
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