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High Risk

NEWS
March 2, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Despite repeated assertions that Gov. Casey wants to crack down on child abuse, his key plan for prevention is followed in his new welfare-budget proposal with this symbol: $0. Nevertheless, Public Welfare Secretary John F. White Jr. said yesterday that the administration was continuing to negotiate with lawmakers and county officials on legislation that would allow social workers to intervene more quickly during crises. White told members of the House Appropriations Committee that the two sides were "close to agreement" on a bill that would expand the definition of abuse to include children who had not been harmed, but who were "at risk.
NEWS
November 2, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
It's the season of falling leaves, pumpkins and apple cider . . . and flu shots. While the flu generally makes its appearance this month or next, it peaks in January and February before declining as spring arrives. Now is the time for vaccinations for those at risk of flu complications, because it takes the body several weeks after vaccination to build up enough antibodies to fight off flu. Shots are especially important for people over age 65 because while flu for most people means just a few days of muscle-aching feverish misery, it can also be dangerous.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Discovery Laboratories Inc., of Warrington, Bucks County, said Friday that W. Thomas Amick, 70, had resigned as chief executive officer and chairman of the board. John Cooper, 54, who was executive vice president and chief financial officer, will now serve as president, CFO and join the board of directors. After years of work, Discovery Labs got FDA approval in 2012 for Surfaxin, a medication to help prevent respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants who are at high risk of developing RDS. The company will begin selling that in the second quarter of 2013.
NEWS
July 20, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health departments handled a deluge of calls from residents who lost power. Agencies checked on high-risk clients. Hospitals turned to generators. The fierce storms that tore through the region Tuesday night left thousands without electricity through yesterday and sternly tested the emergency response plans of medical institutions and health and aging departments. All in all, the region appeared to pass without problems. "The good news is that the generators worked" at Paoli Hospital, said Frieda Schmidt, a spokeswoman for Main Line Health, which includes Paoli.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | By David Hafetz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"On July 29, 1994, my 7-year-old daughter crossed the street," began Maureen Kanka as she described the rape and murder of Megan in a voice that did not waver during a 90-minute talk. It is a story that has become well-known across the country, and one that has led state after state to enact so-called Megan's Laws, requiring convicted sex offenders to notify authorities of their whereabouts. Kanka's daughter was murdered by Jesse Timmendequas, a neighbor who, unbeknownst to the neighborhood, was a convicted sex offender.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - Mammograms aimed at finding breast cancer might actually raise the chances of developing it in young women whose genes put them at higher risk for the disease, a study by leading European cancer agencies suggests. The added radiation from mammograms and other types of tests with chest radiation might be especially harmful to them, and an MRI is probably a safer method of screening women under 30 who are at high risk because of gene mutations, the authors conclude. The study cannot prove a link between the radiation and breast cancer, but it is one of the biggest ever to look at the issue.
NEWS
August 26, 2010
An outbreak of salmonella poisoning that has sickened hundreds of people who ate bad eggs should prompt the Senate to stop sitting on legislation to give the Food and Drug Administration more clout. But instead of its watered-down version that has been collecting dust, the Senate should adopt a House bill passed a year ago. More than 1,300 recent salmonella cases have been linked to contaminated eggs. FDA officials say those illnesses, and the subsequent voluntary recall of a half-billion eggs, might have been avoided if it had the power to inspect agribusinesses before an outbreak and to order product recalls when necessary.
NEWS
October 7, 2004 | By Marian Uhlman, Stacey Burling and Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Ray Bauer scurried over to Camden County's senior health fair yesterday to wait in line for 1 1/2 hours for a much coveted flu shot. "I really do feel lucky," said Bauer, 65, a Haddonfield resident who waited along with 1,800 others for the shot. One day after federal health officials announced that the nation had lost half its flu vaccine supply, the shortage's hard reality started settling in, with doctors' offices and health clinics struggling to offer guidance to anxious patients.
NEWS
March 5, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
William H. Pflaumer, the owner of Schmidt's brewery, has heart problems that may lead to "sudden death," and he should not be sent to prison for evading taxes until more tests are conducted, his attorney contends. U.S. District Judge Charles R. Weiner, who sentenced Pflaumer to a three- year term in 1983, was to hear arguments in the case today. Pflaumer, 51, who reputedly has ties to organized-crime figures, has been free pending appeals, which ended Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court refused to review his conviction.
NEWS
September 30, 2004 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The eighth rape linked through DNA to a serial predator who has attacked women since 2002 in sections of North and South Philadelphia occurred Feb. 15 in the 900 block of South 16th Street, police said yesterday. A 34-year-old woman was asleep in a house on the South Philadelphia block when she was awakened about 2:30 a.m. by a man who claimed he had a knife, although the victim reported never seeing it. The house had no door locks and no working utilities. The intruder repeatedly raped the woman over the next two days, fleeing about noon Feb. 17 when someone knocked on the door, police said.
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